The Mabuhay 1/SuperFerry 10

When Sulpicio Lines fielded the great liner Filipina Princess in the premier route to Cebu in 1988, their main competitor William Lines had to suffer silently for several years. That was because sticking to their old Japanese agent that send them ferries from A” Line, they cannot roll out an equivalent and their liner and new flagship Sugbu that was fielded to the Cebu route in 1990 does not begin to match the Sulpicio Lines flagship (although in actual passengers carried, she can according to a research). And to think in their last match-up in this primary route of the country at the start of the 1980’s, their flagship Dona Virginia, which was the biggest and fastest liner in the country then was at least the equal of the Sulpicio Lines flagship Philippine Princess.

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Sun Flower 5 (from Funikichemurase)

In 1992, William Lines was able to field the Maynilad but although she was impressive and modern-looking she was still not the match of the Filipina Princess especially with her great deficit in speed as she was really a slow ship. In 1993, however, William Lines was able to acquire one of the legendary Sun Flower ships from Blue Highway Line, the Sun Flower 5. It had everything a great liner should possess — the size, the beautiful looks, the luxurious interiors and the speed. It was more than a match for the Filipina Princess which suddenly looked dated by comparison. But Sulpicio Lines will not be denied and they also fielded one of the Sun Flower liners from Blue Highway Line, too, the Sun Flower 11. This liner was bigger, just as well-appointed but a little slower. This ship became the Princess of the Orient and so a great battle of flagships began again in the premier route to Cebu.

The Sun Flower 5 was built in 1973 by the Kurushima Dockyard Company in their Onishi shipyard. She was the third in the Sun Flower series of luxury ships which were all sister ships. However, Sun Flower 11, the future Princess of the Orient, was a little different from the rest. She was a stretched version and she had two center funnels in a line. Two later ships, meanwhile, were shortened versions of the series.

Sun Flower 5 was exactly 185.0 meters in length over-all and her beam was 24.0 meters. Her length between perpendiculars was only 170.0 meters. That difference can be gleaned in her long bow that nearly resembles a clipper bow. She was 12,710 in gross tons, her cubic measure, and her deadweight tonnage (DWT), her cargo carrying capacity, was 3,231 tons. The ship had three passenger decks, two car decks and a mezzanine deck for sedans. Her navigation deck also served as the sun deck and accessible to passengers. She had the permanent ship ID IMO 7302108.

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Mabuhay 1 by Britz Salih

The ship’s RORO ramps were already of the modern design. It was no longer located at the bow which was already deemed as more dangerous then as continuous pounding of the waves over the years along with corrosion were already shown to weaken bow ramps. A frontal collision could also prove calamitous for the ship as shown by experiences. What she had were a pair of front quarter ramps on the port and on the starboard sides. She also had a pair of quarter ramps at the stern. That was a very advantageous set-up because docked sideways she can load and unload simultaneously. Docked stern-wise or Mediterranean style, she can also load and unload at the same time. She had three-piece hydraulic ramps which can always be straightened full-out and long, whether it is high tide or low tide, whether she is docked in a high pier or low pier.

Since her front ramps were no longer located at the bow, it no longer needed to be oval. Instead, it was sleek which gave her a more modern look. She had a single center funnel which also served as the stern mast. To complete the modernity, she was a pioneer among liners in using the new and more efficient bulbous stem. This breaks and guides the waters around the ship better so giving the ships’ speed a little boost. Or put it in another way, for the same speed, a little less fuel will be needed. She was equipped with four Hitachi diesel engines with a total output of 26,080 horsepower. This was coupled to two synchronizers in order to turn the two propellers. She had a top speed of 25.5 knots when new which was really fast for that time. To make the voyage more comfortable in rough waters, she was equipped with fin stabilizers.

The original operator of Sun Flower 5 was the Nihon Kosoku Ferry which was under the Terukuni group. She plied the Tokyo-Nachikatsuura-Kochi route. However, the Oil Crisis of 1973 hit the group hard and Terukuni Kaiun went bankrupt but Nihon Shikoku Ferry continued operating. In 1984, the Nihon Kosoku Ferry sold the Sun Flower 5 to her builder, the Kurushima Dock Company and chartered them back in order to continue operating. But Kurushima Dock Company also collapsed and in 1990, the Nihon Enkai Ferry acquired Sun Flower 5 and fielded her in the Osaka-Kagoshima route. In 1991, Sun Flower 5 became the Sun Flower Osaka. Then Nihon Enkai Ferry changed the company’s name into Blue Highway Line.

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SuperFery 10 by Chief Ray Smith

When she came to the Philippines for William Lines in 1993, Sun Flower Osaka was renamed officially as the Wililines Mabuhay 1. But almost nobody called her by her full name and she was simply Mabuhay 1 to most. She started the William Lines series of luxury liners that were beautiful, well-appointed, fast and with good service to match. And with her characteristics, she was really a good and proper progenitor plus a worthy flagship.

In refitting here, her superstructure was largely left untouched and with such, her beautiful lines remained intact. Moreover, William Lines did not try to cram her with passenger accommodations. So for her size and for the standards of the day, her passenger capacity of 2,034 was relatively low. It was just a little over half of the passenger capacity of her main rival Princess of the Orient. Maybe with her intended routes of Manila-Cebu and Manila-Iloilo only with no Mindanao connections, her passenger capacity might have just enough.

The ship had plenty of passenger space as a result and so she had features like conference and function rooms that take up space but which will be unused most of the time. She was intended to be sold as a “floating hotel” where meetings or small conventions can be held and so she has utilities like fax and telephone services and xerox machines. That was not a far-off sell then because liner rates in those days were comparable to hotel rates when the free food was factored in. It was just like staying in a hotel with free conveyance to one’s destination in province. Actually, with this idea, I was able to convince a friend to just take the Princess of the Pacific as their honeymoon suite instead of a hotel in Baguio.

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SuperFerry 10 by Britz Salih

In her sun deck, Mabuhay 1 had a small swimming pool and a wading pool too for children. The sun deck also hosted a playground for children. If that was not one’s taste, there were also video games in the arcade and movies in the theater. For those who liked it “hotter”, one can belt a tune in the videokes or gyrate in the disco. If that was not enough to work a sweat there was also a physical fitness center. However, as a ship feature I noticed that this one was barely patronized. The fitness craze was not yet “on” then for Pinoys. Cruising should be laid back and fun, wasn’t it?

For those who were in a hurry and forgot their grooming for an important meeting or interview, the beauty and grooming salons took care of that. Those in need of relaxation or easing of body pains can go the shipboard massage parlor. The ship had many lounges where passengers can while their time and this included the ship’s many restaurants. This ship with its high net tonnage to passenger ratio had many spaces where one can walk around in the softness of the carpeted floors. The poop decks also served as promenade areas and observation decks. One of the places to visit then for the artistically inclined was the art gallery, a supportive gesture of William Lines to the budding artists of Cebu.

In refitting here, the ship’s gross tonnage (GT) increased to 13,288. She had a local net tonnage (NT) of 5,480 but her deadweight tonnage (DWT) increased a lot to 7,827 tons. She carried the Philippine Call Sign DUHN3.

For William Lines, she sailed to Cebu twice a week and once a week for Iloilo. She took 20 hours for the 393-nautical mile cruise to Cebu and 18 hours for the 343-nautical mile cruise to Iloilo. Locally, her speed was down to 20 knots but that was still fast by local standards. She had an overnight lay-over in Manila every Saturday. Lay-overs like that were very welcome rest to the crew and an opportunity to them to make visits.

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SuperFerry 10 by Chief Ray Smith

Mabuhay 1 did not have that many accommodation classes unlike one will expect for a ship this size. The reason, I surmise, is they respected and used many of the cabin lay-out in Japan. There were four classes in cabin setting, the Special Suite, the Suite, the First Class Cabin for 4 and the De Luxe Cabin for 2 (First Class Cabins have their own Toilet and Baths while De Luxe Cabins only have a wash). There was also the De Luxe (these has better, semi-private bunks), Tourist and Economy. The fare of the highest class was three-and-a-half times the fare of the lowest class.

All the passage classes were entitled to free meals like in the rest of the liner shipping companies before except for Aboitiz Shipping Corporation where meals were not free (but their fares are correspondingly a little less). There were three restaurants according to class group –– the First Class restaurant, the Tourist restaurant and the Economy restaurant. Suite passengers have the option of being served in their cabins. The fare or meal in each class varies a lot along with the plates and table linen as in from none to true restaurant type. It was not eat-all-you-can for rice in the Economy restaurant.

She did not sail long for William Lines because the merger of William Lines, Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. (CAGLI) and Aboitiz Shipping Corporation (ASC) happened which produced the super-big (for that time) shipping company William, Gothong & Aboitiz or WG&A Philippines in the first day of1996 (but the agreement was sealed in late 1995). In the combined fleet, she was renamed as the SuperFerry 10. “10” maybe because that signifies perfect or highest. They cannot give the “1” to her because the numbers of the original SuperFerries were not changed and there was already a SuperFerry 1.

There was a question which was the flagship of the WG&A fleet. The big, new ship of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation which arrived in 1996 (and which was originally meant to be the new flagship of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation had there been no merger) was given the number “12”. Initially, both the SuperFerry 10 and SuperFerry 12 held the premier Manila-Cebu, v.v. route which was the indication of which is the flagship. SuperFerry 10, however, is bigger than SuperFerry 12, she was no less luxurious or stunning and their speeds were about equal. They might have been actually co-flagships.

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SuperFerry 10 model (Credits to WG&A and Triztan Mallada)

In WG&A, her accommodation class designations were changed. It was now Economy, Tourist, Business Class, Stateroom and Suite. The last two had to be purchased now on a per-room basis and no longer by person basis. There were also changes in the passage rates. The Economy class became more expensive but the highest classes got cheaper.

In later years, SuperFerry 10 was removed from the Manila-Cebu route and she was paired in rotation with SuperFerry 1 and SuperFerry 8 in the express Manila-Iloilo-General Santos City-Davao route. Later, she was paired with SuperFerry 6 in that route and in other routes like the Manila-Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route. All three had about the same passenger capacity and size and about the same speed too, the bases then for the pairing practice of WG&A. The pairing was a way to maintain the same Manila departures for long routes without resorting to the use of the ship on a short voyage (like a Manila-Iloilo or a Manila-Bacolod route) for the duration of the week. This was most acute in the Davao route where one complete voyage takes five days.

After six years, the merger of the William, Gothong and Aboitiz shipping companies broke apart. The Gothong and Chiongbian (of William Lines) families pulled out from WG&A one after the other. To pay off the divestments, ships (both passenger and cargo) had to be liquidated and sold. This started the one-way trip of WG&A and Cebu Ferries Corporation or CFC (their regional subsidiary) ships to the ship breakers and mainly in China. And, sadly, these were ships that were still in good condition and perfectly sailing as WG&A was really good in ship maintenance through WG&A Jebsens which was the former (and later after the break-up) Aboitiz Jebsens.

Among the casualties of these liquidations, very sadly, was Mabuhay 1 or SuperFerry 10. Together with the Our Lady of Akita 2 (the former Maynilad) and the Our Lady of Naju, they were sent as a batch to a China ship breaker. She was broken up on September of 2002 when she was still a good and reliable ship and just sailing for 9 years here. I just wonder why the divesting partners were not just paid in ships. That move would have been able to preserve our good and great liners instead of them becoming ugly scrap metal.

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From http://www.greenshipspotting.com

And that was the inglorious end of the beautiful and great liner Mabuhay 1, a casualty of a wrong turn in Philippine shipping which was the “Great Merger” that in the end only resulted in the liquidation of two great shipping companies. If that did not happen, I am pretty sure the Mabuhay 1 and the William Lines fleet would have been living until the new millennium and who knows, maybe until now.

A Good Class of Ferry is Going Away Soon

I love speed in ships but maybe not that much and so maybe that is the reason I am not too attached to High Speed Crafts or HSCs. That is also the reason why I tend to look at the size and the engine capacity ratio of a ship and see which is more efficient.

A certain class of ferry which belongs to the great ferries (ferries with at least 10,000 gross tons) caught my attention and respect. While we had many ferries that are in the 150-meter class, that class basically used engines of 20,000 horsepower and more. They were capable of 20 knots locally and even more when they were still new abroad.

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Subic Bay 1

But then there was a class of ferries that arrived here that were in the 160-meter class whose engines were below 20,000 horsepower. They were a little less speedy but they proved to be capable of 18.5 knots locally and in a Manila-Cebu run that meant an additional sailing time of just one more hour. And, of course, in capacity they were a little more than the capacity of the 150-meter ferries.

There were only four examples of this class locally. The fast Princess of Paradise of Sulpicio Lines is not included there and so are the St. Pope John Paul II of 2GO which is the former SuperFerry 12 of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation and its sister ship, the Princess of the Universe of Sulpicio Lines and the Mary Queen of Peace of Negros Navigation (which is a shade under 160 meters at 159.5 meters length) for they all packed engines of over 20,000 horsepower.

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Princess of the World by Britz Salih

I am referring here to Manila Bay 1 of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. and its sister ship, the late SuperFerry 6 nee Our Lady of Akita and also the Subic Bay 1 and its sister ship the late Princess of the World. Manila Bay 1 had a length of 162.1 meters and 18,000 horsepower from two NKK-Pielstick engines and here she was capable of 18.5 knots early on. The SuperFerry 6/Our Lady of Akita had exactly the same length, engines and speed here.

Subic Bay 1 of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. has a length of 166.5 meters and 19,700 from two Mitsubishi-MAN engines. Her sister ship the late Princess of the World of Sulpicio Lines had the same length and engines but the rated power is only 18,800 horsepower. They are “thinner” at 24.0 meters breadth compared to the 26.4 meters of SuperFerry 6 and Manila Bay 1 and so they were capable of over 19 knots when they were first fielded here.

How insignificant was their speed disadvantage? Well, WG&A paired the SuperFerry 6 and the SuperFerry 10, the former Mabuhay 1 of William Lines in the Manila-Iloilo-General Santos-Davao, Manila-Cebu-Cagayan de Oro and Manila-Zamboanga-Davao routes. And many know that the SuperFerry 10 ran at up to 20 knots.

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SuperFerry 6 (Credits to PAF and jethro Cagasan)

The SuperFerry 6 did not last sailing as she was hit by engine fire off Batangas in 2000 while sailing from Davao and General Santos City and the Princess of the World was also hit by fire in 2005 off Zamboanga del Norte while en route to Zamboanga from Manila and Iloilo. Both did not sink, however and there were almost no casualties.

What lasted long were the two ships of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. (CAGLI), the Manila Bay 1 and the Subic Bay 1. Well, it seems ships not painted well last longer? However, the Manila Bay 1 was also hit by fire in the bridge but the fire was controlled early. The two ships of CAGLI did not sail as ROPAXes (RORO-Passenger ships) for long as they were suspended by MARINA from carrying passengers because of numerous complaints about long delays in departures and very late arrivals (I was actually a victim of that too when I arrived in Pier 6 at 8pm for a 10pm departure and the ship left at 4:30am and we arrived in Nasipit at night instead of afternoon). From that suspension, CAGLI turned the two into RORO Cargo ships just carrying cars and container vans.

Now those who know shipping knows the replacements of the two ships are already around, the RORO Cargo ships Panglao Bay 1 and Dapitan Bay 1 (which is still being refitted as of the writing of this article in June of 2017). In fact, last April, a member of PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) saw the Subic Bay 1 being towed by a tug headed south and probably destined to a South Asian breaker. Manila Bay 1 might be following her soon when Dapitan Bay 1 enters service and if it does, it will be the end of an era of the 160-meter liners with just 18,000 horsepower engines and 18.5 knots of speed locally.

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Manila Bay 1 and her future replacement Dapitan Bay 1

In terms of cargo capacity they are superior to the 150-meter, 20,000 horsepower ROPAXes especially since they are “fatter” which means their breadths were greater. The four might have not looked sleek or modern as they still have the lines of the Japan big ROPAXes built in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s (well, they were actually built in that period!). But their interiors, if their brochures are studied, says they were not inferior to the sleeker 150-meter ROPAXes.

It is just too bad that two of the four did not last long (but both were highly praised when they were still in service) and the other two were converted into RORO Cargo ships and that is the reason why the lingering appreciation for them is not high and they are even identified by most as a separate separate class. And I just rue they did not really stand out when to think they could have been great.

So this piece is just a paean to them, a reminder too and also a farewell.

The MV St. Pope John Paul II

The MV St. Pope John Paul II which was fielded locally in May of 1996 is now the longest sailing liner in the Philippines. There are many ferries locally which have sailed longer than her but they are not liners. That is not the only claim to fame of the MV St. Pope John Paul II as she is also the biggest and longest among our remaining liners. In all of her 20 years of sailing the local waters and inter-island routes she has been very, very reliable and she has lost nary of her speed. From 20 knots when newly fielded, she can still do 19 knots today. I noticed that when I rode her that her vibration is still okay and she is still not very smoky.

MV St. Pope John Paul II was known in Japan as the New Miyako and she had a sister ship named New Yamato. They were the top ships then of Hankyu Ferry, one of the Japanese long-haul ferries. As a note, “Miyako” and “Yamato” are legendary names in Japan and that is actually a sign of their status. The New Yamato was built in 1983 and the New Miyako in 1984 and both came to the Philippines but though sister ships their superstructures were not really very identical when they were fielded here. Hankyu Ferry disposed of the sister ships at the same time and the New Yamato went to Sulpicio Lines as the Princess of the Universe and the New Miyako went to William, Gothong & Aboitiz (WG&A) as the SuperFerry 12.

In Japan, the sister ship were known as “car ferries”. This was the successor class to the “cruiseferries” built in the 1970’s which were luxurious as they were meant to attract passengers. When ridership weakened because the Japanese were already taking other forms of transportation, the new design of long-haul ferries stressed on taking trucks. This can be seen in the original design of New Yamato and New Miyako which featured two car decks at the lower decks of the ship. The upper two decks for passengers were not shabby by Japan standards but they were not as hotel-like as the “cruiseferries” of the 1970’s, some of which came to the Philippines like the Princess of the Orient and the Mabuhay 1.

The New Miyako was built by Kanda Shipbuilding Company in their Fujiwara yard in Japan. She was actually launched in December of 1983 but her completion took until January of 1984. Her permanent ID is IMO 8217051. She measures 173.0 meters in length over-all, 165.3 meters in length between perpendiculars, 28.8 meters in width and 14.3 meters in depth (that’s deep!). Her original Gross Register Tonnage was 11,914 tons and her DWT was 5,009 tons. She then had two car decks but only one passenger deck with some passenger facilities in the top deck including in the false center funnel. That was the meaning of a Japan “carferry” in the 1980’s.

This ship has a bulbous stem and a transom stern and the usual two masts. Being twin-engined, she has two side funnels. She is powered by a pair of Mitsubishi-MAN diesel engines totalling 24,000 horsepower and her design speed was 21 knots (that means her current speed of 19-19.5 is remarkable because that is not far off from her design speed years ago!). Originally, she was provided with car ramps at the bow and at the stern. However, on refitting, a pair of quarter-ramps were fitted, on the bow and at the stern at the starboard side. An inside ramp connects the two car decks (not elevators unlike in others which is more cumbersome). The ship has a capacity of over 200 TEU but in Japan she mainly carried trucks. In lane-meters, her capacity is about 2,000. The ship’s route is from Shikoku to the Kansai region of Japan.

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In refitting to a passenger-ferry for Philippine use, one level of her car deck was converted into two levels of passenger accommodation. Hence, the ship became a a three passenger-deck ship when she was fielded here. Her local passenger capacity then rose to some 2,800 passengers. This was the time when local passenger liners can still pack it in and had to turn away passengers during peak seasons.

The passengers had access through wing-type passenger ramps on the starboard side. The ship being tall and the highest classes on the top level, boarding would have been an exercise for many passengers except that the ship has an escalator. Like other local liner designs, that led to the front desk/information counter and a lobby. The ship had many levels of accommodation with Suite being the highest followed by Stateroom, First Class Cabin, Tourist, Economy Deluxe and Economy in descending order. Being big, the ship had many walkways, lounges and promenade areas including the sundeck. There were many shops and it even had a wading pool. Restaurants were also segregated into classes as in three, the usual, but the kiosks, stores and bars were for all.

After fielding in May of 1996, SuperFerry 12 displaced the SuperFerry 6 (the former Our Lady of Akita) in pairing with SuperFerry 10 (the former Mabuhay 1) on an exclusive Manila-Cebu route. She was doing it with three round trips a week indicating she was considered a flagship. Later, even SuperFerry 10 was displaced from exclusively holding that route and SuperFerry 12 then alone held that route exclusively for WG&A (of course other W&GA ships also call on Cebu headed south or headed north but not Manila-Cebu exclusively). And so she became the sole flagship of the combined fleet, my assumption. In Manila and Cebu she would often see her sister ship Princess of the Universe and sometimes they are docked adjacent to each other in Cebu International Port (but not in Manila as they have different ports there).

In 2000, SuperFerry 1 and SuperFerry 8 were pairing with each other and SuperFerry 6 and SuperFerry 10 were pairing each other in doing many routes including those that pass in Cebu. But maybe that was the last stable year of her company WG&A and upheavals soon followed and this can be seen even in their top ships. In that same year SuperFerry 6 burned near Verde Island Passage off Batangas. SuperFerry 14 came that year and in effect was the replacement of SuperFerry 6 but she was blown up by terrorists in 2004 (the government denied that but nobody believed them including the maritime databases and international shipping sites). SuperFerry 10, meanwhile, was sold to China breakers in 2003.

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The years starting from 2002 were critical for the company WG&A as partners William and Gothong divested. As a result of that, ferries and cargo/container ships have to be disposed to pay off the former partners. Even the subsidiaries Cebu Ferries Corporation and Philippine Fast Ferry Corporation (the company holding the SuperCats) were affected by that. With a smaller fleet, WG&A then had to reduce routes and frequencies and drop ports of call. That also happened in their subsidiary ferry companies especially Cebu Ferries Corporation. Those were the years the company was looking for its future direction.

Aboitiz Transport System (ATS), the successor to WG&A, when its partners divested had a new series of ships, the SuperFerry 15, 16, 17 and 18 that started started arriving from 2002 to 2004 that tried to replace many of the ships sold or lost. ATS then had a new philosophy that their ROPAXes would have to carry a significant volume of their container vans and that is their reason why they didn’t invest in container ships anymore. The new series of SuperFerries, being “carferries” also in Japan did not have their car decks reduced anymore (it just retained the double car decks). This time the weakening of ship passenger demand was already being felt by the whole shipping industry and hence there was no more desire to remodel liners with passenger capacities of well over 2,000 persons.

With the move to acquire those 4 liners with dual car decks, Aboitiz Transport System was initially able to cover their lack of container ships (well, not really as that provided a window of opportunity to competitors). But with the sharp rise and the doubling of world metal prices in 2006, Aboitiz Transport System was attracted to sell SuperFerry 15, 16, 17, 18 for a tidy profit and only the return of SuperFerry 19 (the former SuperFerry 8 that was re-engined) from Papua New Guinea mitigated that loss. But with the selling of the four, suddenly Aboitiz Transport System was lacking container ships and so they resorted to chartering.

During this period, the passenger volume of Aboitiz Transport System was continuously dropping because of the rise of the budget planes and the intermodal buses. With the coming of the budget airlines, there was already a parity in fares and so passenger felt there was no longer need to “lose” two days in a ship even though they are fed in the voyage. What Aboitiz Transport System did as response was a two-birds-in-one-stone solution – create an additional wagon deck from the two lower passenger decks of SuperFerry 2, SuperFerry 9 and SuperFerry 12 and so the three were converted again. The new look of the three was not beautiful to many including me.

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Along this way when they already lacked ships and passenger patronage was also dropping, SuperFerry 12 became a Manila-Cebu-Cagayan de Oro ship doing a twice a week voyage. And she has been on that route until now. There is now no more dedicated Manila-Cebu ship for a decade now, the first time it happened since 1970 when the Sweet Faith of Sweet Lines arrived.

The SuperFerry 12 did not really become a one-passenger-deck ship again. Part of the uppermost deck for the crew quarters was converted to accommodate passengers and part of the forward section of the upper wagon deck has to be converted too so passenger capacity will not drop too much (the SuperValue or open-air Economy of the ship is located there). It was a good move. There is not much of a perception of lack of passenger space like what one will feel in SuperFerry 2, SuperFerry 20 and SuperFerry 21 especially since she is a long ship. But some of the amenities and space were obviously gone.

This ship still has many cabins and it has a hard time filling those in many voyages. There is a lower MegaValue section (airconditioned accommodations but with economy meals) but the bigger MegaValue section is seldom used. There is really not much passengers anymore these days and if needed instead of opening that section and cleaning it afterwards it would be easier to upgrade some passengers to Tourist. However, the Stateroom and Suite of the ship are still treats especially if one gets tickets ahead of time when it is cheap (it has to be purchased on room and not individual basis). Staterooms and Suites are superior to First Class Cabins in that it only accommodates two passengers in true beds like in a hotel (not bunks) and there is a sala and cabinets. Of course the space is much wider. Get it if you can especially the honeymooners. It is the nearest to a hotel and the meals are free and you get to get to places.

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MV St. Pope John Paul II has a big cafeteria which serves the Economy and Tourist passengers. After meals, this cafeteria also serves as the main lounge of the ship, a corner to while away the time, a place where knick-knacks, merienda and drinks can be bought 20 hours a day and there is even a bar but nowadays few patronize that. At night a band will perform, a way for the ship to increase its revenues (well, so do making it the main lounge of the ship as passengers passing time also buy) and also to serve fun. For those too loath to venture in that area and would rather lay down most of the day then merienda and drinks are vended on trolleys and these will pass by many times in the day and among their offerings is benignit (the Visayan ginataan) which is prepared right in the ship. First Class passengers meanwhile have their own small restaurant in a lower corner of the ship but it is not an eat-all-you-can affair and servings are not big.

The ship has many viewing areas including the sun deck. MV St. Pope John Paul II has the advantage of not having fully enclosed sides. However, the lobby is small but it has a piano that is not being used. There are also other facilities of the ship not being used like the conference room and the spa but the beauty salon is still functional. But sailing with liners now I feel they were not as happy as two decades ago. By the way, the escalator is still there and it leads straight to a statue of the namesake and to the front desk and lobby. And of course, the service crew is on pink, the color of 2GO. Vibrant color but liners were more vibrant way back then. Can’t fault them though for trying.

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The wagon deck of the ship is almost invariably not full. That is what I observed on the usage of the dual-cargo deck 2GO liners. Usually the upper wagon deck is practically not used. And so they can even afford to put up a basketball court there for the crew. But why not for the passengers too? And maybe add a badminton court or volleyball court too and perhaps a ping-pong table too? Nah, the ever-straight MARINA won’t let that because that has been declared a cargo area. So maybe they should just attract truckers and trucks with low rates rather than have it empty. Sayang. It will pay more than vending food inside the ship. But then that might jeopardize their high container van rates.

The MV St. Pope John Paul II is still a reliable ship bravely soldiering on in the face of the decline of liner passengers. She still looks beautiful sans the slanted windows of the cargo deck. The ship is still the longest and biggest in the fleet of 2GO. At 20 years she is already a fixture in her route and I hope they will take care of her well so she continues to sail and sail and sail.

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