The Graceful Stars

The Graceful Stars is one of the most recent ships of Roble Shipping Incorporated, a major regional shipping line serving the ports of western Leyte (which I wonder why it is not a separate province as it is economically viable on its own, it has a ready capital in Ormoc and it speaks a different language from eastern Leyte) which sailed just in 2015 although she came to the Philippines earlier (as she stayed long in the Roble wharf in Pier 7 of Mandaue). As refitted, the Graceful Stars is an overnight ferry-RORO which means she is fitted with bunks, the main distinction of overnight ferries from the short-distance ferries (well, aside from the size, of course).


I look at Graceful Stars from the evolutionary point of view of Roble Shipping. This company started from the Marao, a converted cargo ship and then from that humble beginning they were true with a humble path to greatness by first taking in the discards of the other shipping companies of Cebu and by concentrating on their strong route, the Cebu-Hilongos route which is now already a major route and a gateway to the province of Southern Leyte. Actually eight discards from other shipping companies passed through the fleet of Roble shipping (the Don Bonifacio, the first Guady Cristy, the second Guada Cristy, the Hilongos Diamond, the Hilongos Diamond – II, the Queen Belinda, the Leyte Diamond, and the Cebu Diamond) and that list does not even include the May Josephine, the former Surigao Transport which was more of a cargo ship too like the Marao. A lot of discards but those established what Roble Shipping is today. And there is nothing wrong with the path of Roble Shipping, they should be proud of it because what is important is where they ended up with and where they are now. Actually Roble Shipping in its early days even acted as the conservator of old ferries that might have ended up earlier in the breakers if they have not shown interest in them especially since those were already the obsolete cruiser ferries then (more difficult to load and unload but Roble started in arrastre anyway).

From that simple and humble beginning, Roble Shipping suddenly landed the Heaven Stars which was a former cruiseferry in Japan (cruiseferries are the ferries in Japan that had good amenities and accommodations compare to ferries that were more inclined to the taking in of rolling cargo). Heaven Stars was big for an overnight ferry and she had the amenities of a multi-day liner (I thought then Roble would use her for their approved route to Nasipit). Roble Shipping also snared the Wonderful Star, a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO which unfortunately was lost early (Note: that ferry is different from the current Wonderful Stars). The two ushered the entry of Roble Shipping into the age of ROROs, the successor type to the obsolete cruisers.

But still Roble Shipping was operating a mixed fleet as shown by their acquisition of the Ormoc Star, a cruiser ferry that became a loved ship in her namesake port and city. Then the Wonderful Stars arrived for the company and save for the Heaven Stars she was the most beautiful ship in the fleet of Roble Shipping, and an embodiment of what a moderately sized overnight ferry should be.


Next to come for Roble Shipping was the Beautiful Stars which was just a little bigger than the basic, short-distance ferry-RORO before a slew of another discards from other shipping companies came which became the Joyful Stars, the Theresian Stars, the Blessed Stars and the Sacred Stars in their fleet. These discards needed practically needed no more refitting from Roble Shipping except maybe in the engine department. In modern shipping companies it is Roble Shipping which is the master in making discarded ships work.

The Wonderful Stars, Theresian Stars and Joyful Stars were significant for Roble Shipping because that firmly established the shipping company in the 70-meter class of ROROs (okay, the Theresian Stars is 0.3 meters short of 70 meters). Let it be noted that the Heaven Stars was 89 meters long and that will show the jump then made in size by Roble Shipping when they acquired her. These overnight ferry-ROROs might have been smaller than what Cebu Ferries, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines or Cokaliong Shipping Lines have or had (and to a certain extent George & Peter Lines too) but let it be noted that Roble Shipping is only operating routes to Leyte (until recently) and not to Mindanao unlike the other mentioned ones. And so Roble Shipping actually was leading then what can be called the second pack of Cebu ferries except that Lite Ferries’ fleet exploded later in size courtesy of the wand of a patron saint.

The Graceful Stars is in the 70-meter class thereby consolidating the hold of Roble Shipping in that class. And more importantly, the Graceful Stars was the attempt of Roble Shipping into the type of converting vehicle carriers into ROPAXes like what was done before by Cebu Ferries Corporation with their Cebu Ferry line of ships (Cebu Ferry 1, 2 and 3) and what was to be done later by Roble Shipping in their Oroquieta Stars. Is this the new mode of the company aside from acquiring Cargo RORO LCTs and CHA-ROs?


The TKB Emerald by James Gabriel Verallo

The Graceful Stars is the former ship of Toyama Kaigai Boeki Shipping named the TKB Emerald and was classified as a Vehicle Carrier in Japan or which is that used in ferrying vehicles in relatively short distances. This is different from the Pure Car Carriers which ferry new vehicles between countries or the Cargo ROROs or RORO Cargo ships which are bigger, have a bigger capacity and go longer distances and even to another adjacent country. A Vehicle Carrier has a limited accommodation for passengers which are usually the crew or drivers of the vehicles and that is their difference over the ROPAXes.

As such converting a Vehicle Carrier to a ROPAX or RORO-Passenger ship means a lot of steel still has to be added into the ship in the form of additional decks and passenger amenities and accommodations. And that is the difference in the conversion if the original ship is a RORO Cargo ship for in that type of ship not much steel is still needed and in some cases steel has to be cut to pave way for windows.

The TKB Emerald took long in conversion and much longer than the Cebu Ferry line of ships (about four years from 2011). With a surplus of ships Roble Shipping didn’t need to rush and the refitting of Joyful Stars and Theresian Stars took precedence (otherwise the two would have rotted). The conversion won’t also be that straighforward as the TKB Emerald has a sloping ramp which slid down to the car deck and two passenger decks had to be fitted (single passenger decks are just for the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs). And I have heard then too and confirmed it with the databases that the engine of the TKB Emerald was on the small side at just 1,370 horsepower and a single engine at that when ferries of this size normally have two engines with 2,000 horsepower as the very minimum (many even pack 4,000 horsepower or more). Adding lots of steel also slows down the ferry because of the added weight. With this and even with the aid of turbocharging one cannot expect TKB Emerald to run fast. However, one of the strengths of the TKB Emerald is a long and good three-piece ramp which is excellent for loading and unloading vehicles including container vans mounted on truck-trailers


TKB Emerald magically converted into Graceful Stars (Photo by James Gabriel Verallo)

The Graceful Stars is 73.7 meters in length over-all with a breadth of 13.6 meters and a depth of 7.6 meters (which is on the deep side which means greater stability) and an original Gross Tonnage (GT) of 1,953 tons and an original design speed of 11.5 knots (which was not bad then but then a lot of steel has to be added to her in her conversion). She was built by Shin Kochi Jyuko Company Limited in Kochi, Japan in 1984 with the IMO Number 8314312. The ship is of steel construction and had a stern ramp leading to the car deck.

As rebuilt she already has two passenger decks with a little squat appearance (but not looking bad) as the bridge determined the height of the superstructure unlike the Cebu Ferry 1 of Cebu Ferries Corporation. This is not really unusual as Cokaliong Shipping has low-looking ferries too. The bridge was lengthened up to the sides as the original bridge is the small type.

In the lower passenger deck at the front are the highest class which are the Suites and the Cabins. These have a Chinese and wooden motif. Before reaching that from the stern where the passengers board is the Tourist section of the ship. The upper passenger deck of the ship contains the Economy Class which is open-air, as normal. Two gangways serve as the entry and exit for the passengers.


Cabins and Suites of Graceful Stars (does it still look like a Vehicle Carrier?)

As rebuilt the Gross Tonnage (GT) of the ship went down to 970 which is an under-declaration with a Net Tonnage (NT) of 660. The ratio of the NT to the GT is suspicious. I have yet to learn of the passenger capacity of the ship.

When I rode with her to Baybay, her usual route, our ride was comfortable and it did not disappoint. The ship was clean and the aircon was cool. Our trip to Baybay took eight hours and for a distance of a little under 60 nautical miles that means our cruising speed was some 8 knots or so. I heard the maximum she can do is 10 knots although when first fielded I heard tales of late arrivals as in a breakfast docking already from a 9pm departure in Cebu. I heard most of the passengers did not complain as that is still a good arrival and they appreciated the superior amenities and accommodations compared to the earlier ships that served the Baybay route. Meanwhile, her competitor Rosalia 3 of Lapu-lapu Shipping with 3 engines and speedy for a small overnight ferry sped up her passage as that is all she can improve from being an old ferry of fishing vessel origins. To passengers still going far her 3am arrival will matter (her number matches well with that and so renaming her to Rosalia 3am to highlight her strength might be in order, pun intended).

But right now the Graceful Stars lords over the Baybay route and the funny thing is she is even better than the ships fielded in the premier Ormoc route which costs significantly more. And it is doubly funny because for nearly the same distance the Ormoc ships cost much more than the Baybay ships which turn out to be a bargain. For the P510 Tourist fare of Ormoc one can have a more luxurious and fresher-smelling ride in Graceful Stars for P380 and the difference will be enough for a Jollibee breakfast just outside the port gates of Baybay and the change will still be enough for a bus ride to Ormoc. Baybay by the way is a good alternate point of entry if one is headed to Tacloban or to any Samar town. It is good that she is in Baybay because if she is in Hilongos because if she is in the latter her lack of speed will show because the port is gateway to the Southern Leyte towns and so a pre-dawn arrival is preferred there so the passengers will arrive at their homes at breakfast time.


Rosalia 3 and Graceful Stars in Baybay

It seems Roble Shipping made a correct bet in acquiring and refurbishing the Graceful Stars. In the Baybay route her lack of speed does not easily show as passengers don’t normally grumble unless the arrival is already past breakfast time already. Many actually don’t want to be bothered from sleep of the anchor dropping and the shrilly announcements in the public address system and the bustle of passengers moving and the porters coming. And her superior accommodations means she will lord over Baybay for a long time that I fear that if other older ships of Roble are rotated to Baybay (like the Joyful Stars and the Theresian Stars) the passengers there might grumble with the change.

It seems the former TKB Emerald has already found a home in Baybay and it seems she will be in there for a long time and dominate that route.


The Maria Matilde

The ferry Maria Matilde of Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) of Batangas was in the news lately because of a mishap she suffered while in transit from Odiongan port to Romblon port when she tried the hardness and strength of her bow against what seems to an overhanging rock and she lost. Actually she was lucky because had there been more clearance below the overhanging rock, the bow would have been cleared and instead it will be the bridge of the ship which will strike the rock and it would have been a good comeuppance for her negligent bridge crew who have been too good in making ridiculous excuses after the accident happened. Scores of passengers have been hurt in the accident necessitating the bringing of several to hospitals. It was also reported that four vehicles aboard the ship also sustained damages (maybe it jumped the wheel chocks). Well, imagine a ship probably sailing at 12 knots or over 20 kilometers per hour coming to a halt in a split second without warning. Many would be hurtling forward then, unplanned and unwarned.


Taken from Credits to Romblon News Network.

The Maria Matilde was once thought by some as the biggest ferry of Montenegro Lines but actually it is not true as their ferry Maria Xenia from Shipshape/Safeship is actually a little larger than her. Whatever, when the Reina del Rosario came from Trans-Asia Shipping Lines of Cebu with its 82.8 meters length and over 2,000 of gross tonnage, there was no assertion anymore that the Maria Matilde was the biggest ship of Montenegro Lines and so the former Cebuano ship won.

Actually, the two ships are familiar with each other. Once upon a time, the Maria Matilde might have been the most distant ship of Montenegro Lines in terms of fielding. When she was first sailed in 2005, she was on the Cagayan de Oro-Cebu-Iloilo-Puerto Princesa route (imagine a route that long). Now I just can’t remember if the Surigao-Siargao ferries of Montenegro Lines came earlier but probably not. So, the Maria Matilde was an overnight ferry from the very start and might even qualify technically as a multi-day liner although it is really an effort for a passenger bound for Puerto Princesa as the ship spends the daytime in port waiting for the next leg of journey in the night. Well, that could be a lot of free tourism for the more adventurous but unlike true liners of the period then they will not be fed while on port.

A few years before the Maria Matilde came, the Negros Navigation Company (NENACO) and later through Jensen Shipping tried the same route and it bombed. So I was wondering if Montenegro Lines knew a secret that Negros Navigation did not know or if they have a better formula. After all in the different legs of the route the Maria Matilde will be experiencing tough competition especially in the first two legs and in the last leg (the Iloilo-Puerto Princesa leg) the traffic between its two ports is not really heavy and actually Montenegro Lines is already serving that route aside from the original holder of the route, the hardy survivor Milagrosa Shipping Lines.


Photo by Edsel Benavides

Apparently, Montenegro Lines did not know any better and they bombed out too. First, they cut the route to Cagayan de Oro. That is the prime Visayas-Mindanao route and competition there is very tough with the top competitors even fielding former liners aside from real liners from Manila holding the Manila-Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route (like the former SuperFerry 12 that is now known as the St. Pope John Paul II which is still plying the route). The Maria Matilde was severely outclassed in modernness of the competitors, in size, in the amenities and accommodations and in the speed when some can do almost twice her speed. And in passenger service there is almost no way for them to beat the liners (Montenegro Lines was never known for service especially since they have never experienced liner sailing). And the Maria Matilde does not even offer free food as that is the domain of the liners but not of the Batangas ferries. Additionally, some passengers bound for Iloilo or Bacolod can just take the liners doing the Cagayan de Oro-Iloilo-Manila or the Cagayan de Oro-Bacolod-Manila routes. If the passenger is still bound for Puerto Princesa he or she can just transfer to an Iloilo-Puerto Princesa ferry. In the Cebu-Iloilo leg the Cebu shipping companies also have good ferries and again that is another top route from Cebu. I felt then that the Maria Matilde was in a cul-de-sac especially since I know the Batangas people don’t know how good are the top overnight ferries of Cebu (all they know is beat the crappy Viva Shipping Lines standard).

In a span of a few years, Montenegro Lines gave up and brought back the Maria Matilde to Batangas to do their MIMAROPA Region overnight routes like their route to Romblon from Batangas. There, the Maria Matilde is not outclassed as Batangas barely know overnight ferries and in fact just have a few and it is one area where ROROs without bunks are used in night routes and so people use the benches as “bunks” leading to complaints by some and the crew there is not good in instilling discipline and unlike in the Visayas-Mindanao region the passengers are not averse to appropriating the whole bench for themselves. Well, that is the consequence of having no proper bunks. The Maria Matilde has been one of the longest overnight ships now in the Romblon route together with the biggest ship of Montenegro Lines, the Reina del Rosario. If they know each other in Romblon, they actually knew each other before in Cebu when the latter was still with Trans-Asia Shipping Lines.

The Maria Matilde is a not a new ship by any means and she belongs to the class that the haters of old ships love to jeer (because they have vested self-interest). She actually doesn’t show her age although she was built way back in 1971 or 46 years ago (well, Montenegro Lines is really good in refurbishing and maintaining old ferries). Her builder is the Taguma Zosen in Innoshima, Japan and she carries the IMO Number 7106126 which indicate when her keel was laid up.

ferry goto

Taken by John Michael Aringay from

Originally, she was known as the Ferry Goto of the Kyushu Shosen KK of Nagasaki, Japan. She must have been doing the Nagasaki to Goto route as her name is an obvious giveaway. As such she might have been familiar with the Ferry Fukue which also came to the Philippines that is now known now as the Filipinas Iligan of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (that is if she was sailing to the southern island of Fukue). However, when that ship came the Maria Matilde was no longer in Cebu.

The Maria Matilde has a steel hull and had car ramps at the bow and at the stern that led to the single car deck. She already has the modern semi-bulbous stem and the usual transom stern of a ROPAX (RORO-Passenger) ship. Her length is 73.6 meters with a beam of 14.3 meters (which is only declared as 12.0 meters here but international databases says otherwise and 12.0 meters breadth are for the smaller ferries) and a depth of 4.8 meters. Her declared gross tonnage is 1,266 which is just about the same as her original gross register tonnage of 1,262 (and that is after adding an additional passenger deck). Her declared net tonnage is 693 with a passenger capacity of 832 (that includes the old Jet Seater class of the ship) in two-and-a-half passenger decks. She is powered by two Hanshin marine diesels with a total of 4,000 horsepower and her original top speed (the design speed) was 16 knots (lately she is still capable of a cruising speed of 13 knots which is not that far off from her design speed). Hanshin is not a common engine for passenger ships.

Unlike most Batangas passenger ships, the Maria Matilde is equipped with two stern passenger ramps (in Batangas, in general, the passengers enter and exit through the car deck and ramp heightening the chance on an accident). Part of the car deck was once used converted for passengers but it was removed now. The ferry also has a forecastle and small poop deck aside from two funnels which signifies two engines.


Photo by Nowell Alcancia

The Maria Matilde might have remained an obscure ferry doing its job silently except when she was thrown into ignominy when she hit that overhanging rock last September 25, 2017 in Calatrava town of Tablas island, Romblon when the ferry was on the way from Odiongan to Romblon town (some reports said she grounded but that seems not to be the case as the stem of the ship is undamaged). Minor accidents and incidents are part of a ship’s life but the unusualness of the accident put this good ferry in a bad light due to the incompetence of the bridge crew. Nowadays, with pocket Wi-Fi and smartphones keeping lid on accidents on passenger ships with casualties is hard to do as it hits the public immediately. The only similar accident to this that I know was when the flagship of Escano Lines, the Fernando Escano II rammed the concrete battleship island in the mouth of Manila Bay in 1969 that also damaged the ship’s bow.

The crew when asked by media offered many lousy, unbelievable excuses. One said there was a steering failure (but then the ship was able to dock later in Romblon port and offload not only vehicles and passengers but also the wounded). Another said there was failure in the GPS instrument of the ship (but then there should still be nautical charts in the bridge and navigators that constantly plot the position of the ship). There is no question that there is bad visibility when the incident happened and it was still dark as it was just dawn yet and raining. But then if the radar is working and the bridge crew was not sleepy they should have seen that there was an obstacle ahead. Actually, the most likely thing that happened is the ship drifted because of the currents and the bridge crew failed to notice and correct it. In terms of familiarity of the course, the ship cannot give it as an excuse as they were on their regular route (and what are nautical charts for anyway?). Now, was there even a look-out or the look-out was busy stirring his cup of coffee?

With the accident, the length over-all of the ship shortened (although they will bring that to the shipyard for repairs and that is easy to remedy). However, the reputation on the crew and the ship is harder to repair now. With the Net, a search on Maria Matilde will always lead back to the accident in Romblon and that will be for years on end (what a disgrace). If we can search Fernando Escano II’s accident of almost half a century ago, imagine how long Maria Matilde’s accident will be searchable even if she is gone already. I don’t know if it is already time to change the ship’s name.


Credits to The Manila Chronicle and Gorio Belen

Even then this ship is still a reliable ship that is capable of sailing many more years unless some government device is approved to cull old ships like that signed agreement to cut carbon dioxide emissions (practically no old ship of ours will survive massive carbon cuts unless re-engined but that is not cheap). Her owner Montenegro Lines is really good in prolonging the lives of their old ships and will even resort to re-engining if needed (we really love and value old ships, don’t we?).

Now if only her crew had been more careful.

The Asia Philippines

Just recently, I was on a tour and I took the Trans-Asia Shipping Lines ferry Asia Philippines on the way home by plan. I strove to sail with her since I want to compare her with her sister ship, the Danica Joy 2 of Aleson Shipping Lines of Zamboanga which is probably sadly gone now since she was no longer salvaged after she capsized in Zamboanga port due to a mistake in the unloading of the ship almost exactly a year ago on September 2016 (she is now gone from Zamboanga port having lain there on her side for some time).


In the comparison I found that the Danica Joy 2 had the superior accommodations and better amenities between the two. Asia Philippines is no better than the sold-now former Asia Indonesia which formerly plied the Cebu-Masbate route for Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. The two are basic overnight ferries for maybe just the purpose of having sleeping accommodations while sailing and their early 1990’s refittings are clearly evident. There is an air-conditioned Tourist section alright plus a Cabin by the bridge deck in the officers’ cabin row and the usual Economy and a basic kiosk and a restaurant that offers hot food at a high price but nothing much else and there is not even a proper lounge for passengers. 

I found out that the appointments of the Danica Joy 2 are a little better. There are Cabins and the Tourist is larger and with more room to walk around plus there is a lounge and I got the feeling that with a limited space Danica Joy 2 tries to make the passengers more comfortable as its route to Sandakan is longer that it can also qualify as a liner route as it is more than an overnight route. The canteen is also better and hot food can be ordered also plus there is a separate restaurant for the crew in the aft of the navigation deck. What is more it is female attendants that attend to the canteen.


The two ships have the same origins as both are former vessels of the Shikoku Ferry in Japan which links Shikoku island with Japan’s largest island of Honshu. The Asia Philippines was the Orange Star in Japan while the Danica Joy 2 was the Orange Hope.

The Orange Star was built by Nakamura Zosen in their Matsue yard in Japan in 1975. Her keel was laid in November 1974 (thus her IMO Number is 7434262) and she was completed in April 1975. She is a RORO ship with bow and stern ramps and a single car deck between the ramps. The Length Over-all (LOA) of the ship is 67.2 meters and the Length Between Perpendiculars (LBP or LPP) is 60.3 meters with a Beam or Breadth of 14.2 meters which means she is wider than most ferries of that length. Originally, the ship’s Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) was 997 tons with a Deadweight Tonnage (DWT) of 413 tons.

Of course, the hull material of the ship is steel alloy and she has 2 masts and two funnels at the top signifying she has two engines which are two sturdy Daihatsu marine engines of 2,000 horsepower each for a total of 4,000 horsepower which is better than most of the ships this size at the approximate period the ship was built. As such the design speed was 15.5 knots which was better than most for ferries of this size built in the mid-1970’s. Incidentally, she was the last ship built by Nakamura Zosen in the Matsue yard (the Danica Joy 2 was built by Nakamura Zosen in their Yanai yard in 1982).

The Asia Philippines came to the country in 1994 when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) was acquiring a lot of RORO vessels and expanding and has already disposed of their old cruiser vessels (the company was among the regionals which was early in shifting to ROROs from cruisers). The Orange Star was the replacement of an earlier cruiser Asia Philippines of the company which was sold to Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) which became their Tandag, the first steel ferry of the company (now who can believe that just over 20 years ago such is the disparity of the two companies that Cokaliong was just buying cast-offs of Trans-Asia then when now they are already the leading company?).

The first route of the new Asia Philippines was the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route in tandem with the beautiful and bigger Trans-Asia (1), the best overnight ship then from Cebu to Northern Mindanao. That pairing assignment lasted until 1975 only when the sister ship of Trans-Asia (1), the Asia China arrived and Asia Philippines was then reassigned to the Cebu-Iloilo route of the company. Now, until just recently the Asia Philippines was still doing that route at times, the concrete indication of the lack of progress of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines over the decades when nearly ten years ago the Asia Philippines already had to battle the much-superior Filipinas Cebu of Cokaliong Shipping Lines in the important Cebu-Iloilo route.

When I rode her, the Asia Philippines is the regular of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines in the Cagayan de Oro-Tagbilaran route, a minor route which she plies with three round trips a week every night with a diversion to Cebu from Tagbilaran once a week. As of now the Asia Philippines is already the lowermost in the totem pole of the Trans-Asia ships because the equally old Trans-Asia 2 is bigger and considered superior to her and holds the more important Cebu-Ozamis route. In size, the Asia Philippines is roughly approximate to the Trans-Asia 8 of the company but the is a newer ship than her with better appointments and speed.


Asia Philippines Tourist section


Asia Philippines Economy section

The Asia Philippines has only two passenger decks with a small Tourist section in the lower passenger deck ahead of the restaurant which is located at the middle of that deck and behind that is Economy section. The upper deck is an all-Economy accommodation. As mentioned earlier the ship has no lounge and no Cabin either (did I simply not saw it?) and there is just a small front desk at the front of the restaurant on the opposite side of the kiosk. The basic restaurant is air-conditioned and it is beside the mess for the crew and that area is also where they cook the food called the galley in a ship. With a tight space the crew eat standing up or otherwise they bring their meals on styropor boxes elsewhere and usually in the passageway either standing or crouching.


Asia Philippines restaurant


Asia Philippines crew lunch

Like in other overnight ferries linen is complimentary in the Tourist section and there is none for the Economy class. At first the aircon in the Tourist that not seem strong enough but as the night deepens one will also need the blanket provided free of charge. One very noticeable weak point of the ship is the toilet and bath. It is simply to small for the passenger capacity and at times one has to queue especially in the morning. And there is practically no provision for showering. Near the front desk and the canteen are two sofas which serves as the “lounge” of the ship.


Asia Philippines canteen. The ship galley is behind that.

The ship is equipped with a side ramp and a gangway on the side. I found out this is what they use in Tagbilaran port when they do side docking. At the stern of the ship is the usual two gangways for the passengers, a facility so that the cargo operations of the ships is unimpeded and this is a necessity since at times the ramp of the ship is over a meter below the wharf apron in low tide.

Asia Philippines

Asia Philippines stern

The car ramp of the ship is the usual clipped or shortened type commonly found in Cebu overnight ferries that are better for the Cebu-type of forklift operation. This is so because almost all of the cargo of the ship is loose cargo or palletized and forklifts are used to move those. In Cebu overnight ferries one forklift at the wharf and another forklift at the car deck pass to each other the cargo and the lip of the ramp is just danger to the forklift above especially when wet or muddy. And besides the ship don’t ballast anyway like most Cebu overnight ships and when the tide is low there is no way to deploy the ramp to the wharf and so the ramp just resides at the side of the wharf and the lip will then just be an obstruction and so they just remove it.

The problem with clipped ramp happens when a car has to be loaded. It is not too difficult when the ramp can be deployed atop the wharf when the tide is high. The problem arises when the ramp can’t be deployed atop the wharf. That is what happened to us in Cebu. Light vehicles won’t depress much the ramp when the weight of the car is transferred to the ramp but loaded trucks are another matter. Of course the company has already mastered the art of making this difficult loading possible.


The Asia Philippines is getting old and obsolescent already for Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. I don’t know if the company is already thinking of disposing her now that TASLI has already a more moneyed owner, the Udenna group of Dennis Uy that also controls now 2GO, the only liner company left in the country. Maybe Udenna will find out now that the amenities of Asia Philippines is already deficient by the standards of today and certainly far from their former Cebu Ferries ships. But then the company will always find out that this lesser ferry still fits their Cagayan de Oro-Tagbilaran route and will even fit their Cebu-Masbate route, a route where the passenger service of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines stopped (but not the cargo service) because they lacked ferries for some time now especially when the beautiful sister ships Trans-Asia (1) and Asia China were sold without replacements. However, if she is retained for a while for service in the minor routes I think it will be be better if her accommodations are improved and 2GO is an old  master of such improvements.

But should the coming five more ships of Starlite Ferries (a shipping company now also owned by the Udenna group) is diverted to Trans-Asia Shipping Lines then the Asia Philippines will be disposable and not necessarily to the breakers. She is still too good for the broken up and she can be sold to carriers in the eastern seaboard (or maybe to another overnight ferry company in Cebu). My only comment is her engines is a little big for the routes there where speed is not really that much needed there (and even with 4,000 horsepower Asia Philippines can’t seem to get much speed nowadays anyway). I remember that was also the problem of the Trans-Asia Shipping Lines’ Asia Japan with has the same 4,000 horsepower from two Daihatsu engines and of about the same size. Well, with the shorter Cagayan de Oro-Tagbilaran route that lack of speed will not be a problem. But in the Cebu-Masbate route it will be, a little.

With the entry of the Udenna group, I really can’t guess the future of Asia Philippines but it might not be the same as the other old ships of the company which is continually run because there are no new ships anyway. And the entry of big Udenna group is good because Trans-Asia Shipping Lines will be injected with new life again, for sure.

Wither Asia Philippines? We will see that in the coming days.