The Mabuhay 1/SuperFerry 10

When Sulpicio Lines fielded the great liner Filipina Princess in the premier route to Cebu in 1988, their main competitor William Lines had to suffer silently for several years. That was because sticking to their old Japanese agent that send them ferries from A” Line, they cannot roll out an equivalent and their liner and new flagship Sugbu that was fielded to the Cebu route in 1990 does not begin to match the Sulpicio Lines flagship (although in actual passengers carried, she can according to a research). And to think in their last match-up in this primary route of the country at the start of the 1980’s, their flagship Dona Virginia, which was the biggest and fastest liner in the country then was at least the equal of the Sulpicio Lines flagship Philippine Princess.

3969795793_4fabc1564d_o.gif

Sun Flower 5 (from Funikichemurase)

In 1992, William Lines was able to field the Maynilad but although she was impressive and modern-looking she was still not the match of the Filipina Princess especially with her great deficit in speed as she was really a slow ship. In 1993, however, William Lines was able to acquire one of the legendary Sun Flower ships from Blue Highway Line, the Sun Flower 5. It had everything a great liner should possess — the size, the beautiful looks, the luxurious interiors and the speed. It was more than a match for the Filipina Princess which suddenly looked dated by comparison. But Sulpicio Lines will not be denied and they also fielded one of the Sun Flower liners from Blue Highway Line, too, the Sun Flower 11. This liner was bigger, just as well-appointed but a little slower. This ship became the Princess of the Orient and so a great battle of flagships began again in the premier route to Cebu.

The Sun Flower 5 was built in 1973 by the Kurushima Dockyard Company in their Onishi shipyard. She was the third in the Sun Flower series of luxury ships which were all sister ships. However, Sun Flower 11, the future Princess of the Orient, was a little different from the rest. She was a stretched version and she had two center funnels in a line. Two later ships, meanwhile, were shortened versions of the series.

Sun Flower 5 was exactly 185.0 meters in length over-all and her beam was 24.0 meters. Her length between perpendiculars was only 170.0 meters. That difference can be gleaned in her long bow that nearly resembles a clipper bow. She was 12,710 in gross tons, her cubic measure, and her deadweight tonnage (DWT), her cargo carrying capacity, was 3,231 tons. The ship had three passenger decks, two car decks and a mezzanine deck for sedans. Her navigation deck also served as the sun deck and accessible to passengers. She had the permanent ship ID IMO 7302108.

3233571716_da95e45cb5_z

Mabuhay 1 by Britz Salih

The ship’s RORO ramps were already of the modern design. It was no longer located at the bow which was already deemed as more dangerous then as continuous pounding of the waves over the years along with corrosion were already shown to weaken bow ramps. A frontal collision could also prove calamitous for the ship as shown by experiences. What she had were a pair of front quarter ramps on the port and on the starboard sides. She also had a pair of quarter ramps at the stern. That was a very advantageous set-up because docked sideways she can load and unload simultaneously. Docked stern-wise or Mediterranean style, she can also load and unload at the same time. She had three-piece hydraulic ramps which can always be straightened full-out and long, whether it is high tide or low tide, whether she is docked in a high pier or low pier.

Since her front ramps were no longer located at the bow, it no longer needed to be oval. Instead, it was sleek which gave her a more modern look. She had a single center funnel which also served as the stern mast. To complete the modernity, she was a pioneer among liners in using the new and more efficient bulbous stem. This breaks and guides the waters around the ship better so giving the ships’ speed a little boost. Or put it in another way, for the same speed, a little less fuel will be needed. She was equipped with four Hitachi diesel engines with a total output of 26,080 horsepower. This was coupled to two synchronizers in order to turn the two propellers. She had a top speed of 25.5 knots when new which was really fast for that time. To make the voyage more comfortable in rough waters, she was equipped with fin stabilizers.

The original operator of Sun Flower 5 was the Nihon Kosoku Ferry which was under the Terukuni group. She plied the Tokyo-Nachikatsuura-Kochi route. However, the Oil Crisis of 1973 hit the group hard and Terukuni Kaiun went bankrupt but Nihon Shikoku Ferry continued operating. In 1984, the Nihon Kosoku Ferry sold the Sun Flower 5 to her builder, the Kurushima Dock Company and chartered them back in order to continue operating. But Kurushima Dock Company also collapsed and in 1990, the Nihon Enkai Ferry acquired Sun Flower 5 and fielded her in the Osaka-Kagoshima route. In 1991, Sun Flower 5 became the Sun Flower Osaka. Then Nihon Enkai Ferry changed the company’s name into Blue Highway Line.

24650731732_c5a70a47ef_b.jpg

SuperFery 10 by Chief Ray Smith

When she came to the Philippines for William Lines in 1993, Sun Flower Osaka was renamed officially as the Wililines Mabuhay 1. But almost nobody called her by her full name and she was simply Mabuhay 1 to most. She started the William Lines series of luxury liners that were beautiful, well-appointed, fast and with good service to match. And with her characteristics, she was really a good and proper progenitor plus a worthy flagship.

In refitting here, her superstructure was largely left untouched and with such, her beautiful lines remained intact. Moreover, William Lines did not try to cram her with passenger accommodations. So for her size and for the standards of the day, her passenger capacity of 2,034 was relatively low. It was just a little over half of the passenger capacity of her main rival Princess of the Orient. Maybe with her intended routes of Manila-Cebu and Manila-Iloilo only with no Mindanao connections, her passenger capacity might have just enough.

The ship had plenty of passenger space as a result and so she had features like conference and function rooms that take up space but which will be unused most of the time. She was intended to be sold as a “floating hotel” where meetings or small conventions can be held and so she has utilities like fax and telephone services and xerox machines. That was not a far-off sell then because liner rates in those days were comparable to hotel rates when the free food was factored in. It was just like staying in a hotel with free conveyance to one’s destination in province. Actually, with this idea, I was able to convince a friend to just take the Princess of the Pacific as their honeymoon suite instead of a hotel in Baguio.

5083054761_55f22fe8f2_b.jpg

SuperFerry 10 by Britz Salih

In her sun deck, Mabuhay 1 had a small swimming pool and a wading pool too for children. The sun deck also hosted a playground for children. If that was not one’s taste, there were also video games in the arcade and movies in the theater. For those who liked it “hotter”, one can belt a tune in the videokes or gyrate in the disco. If that was not enough to work a sweat there was also a physical fitness center. However, as a ship feature I noticed that this one was barely patronized. The fitness craze was not yet “on” then for Pinoys. Cruising should be laid back and fun, wasn’t it?

For those who were in a hurry and forgot their grooming for an important meeting or interview, the beauty and grooming salons took care of that. Those in need of relaxation or easing of body pains can go the shipboard massage parlor. The ship had many lounges where passengers can while their time and this included the ship’s many restaurants. This ship with its high net tonnage to passenger ratio had many spaces where one can walk around in the softness of the carpeted floors. The poop decks also served as promenade areas and observation decks. One of the places to visit then for the artistically inclined was the art gallery, a supportive gesture of William Lines to the budding artists of Cebu.

In refitting here, the ship’s gross tonnage (GT) increased to 13,288. She had a local net tonnage (NT) of 5,480 but her deadweight tonnage (DWT) increased a lot to 7,827 tons. She carried the Philippine Call Sign DUHN3.

For William Lines, she sailed to Cebu twice a week and once a week for Iloilo. She took 20 hours for the 393-nautical mile cruise to Cebu and 18 hours for the 343-nautical mile cruise to Iloilo. Locally, her speed was down to 20 knots but that was still fast by local standards. She had an overnight lay-over in Manila every Saturday. Lay-overs like that were very welcome rest to the crew and an opportunity to them to make visits.

24140382614_1e3d641afb_b.jpg

SuperFerry 10 by Chief Ray Smith

Mabuhay 1 did not have that many accommodation classes unlike one will expect for a ship this size. The reason, I surmise, is they respected and used many of the cabin lay-out in Japan. There were four classes in cabin setting, the Special Suite, the Suite, the First Class Cabin for 4 and the De Luxe Cabin for 2 (First Class Cabins have their own Toilet and Baths while De Luxe Cabins only have a wash). There was also the De Luxe (these has better, semi-private bunks), Tourist and Economy. The fare of the highest class was three-and-a-half times the fare of the lowest class.

All the passage classes were entitled to free meals like in the rest of the liner shipping companies before except for Aboitiz Shipping Corporation where meals were not free (but their fares are correspondingly a little less). There were three restaurants according to class group –– the First Class restaurant, the Tourist restaurant and the Economy restaurant. Suite passengers have the option of being served in their cabins. The fare or meal in each class varies a lot along with the plates and table linen as in from none to true restaurant type. It was not eat-all-you-can for rice in the Economy restaurant.

She did not sail long for William Lines because the merger of William Lines, Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. (CAGLI) and Aboitiz Shipping Corporation (ASC) happened which produced the super-big (for that time) shipping company William, Gothong & Aboitiz or WG&A Philippines in the first day of1996 (but the agreement was sealed in late 1995). In the combined fleet, she was renamed as the SuperFerry 10. “10” maybe because that signifies perfect or highest. They cannot give the “1” to her because the numbers of the original SuperFerries were not changed and there was already a SuperFerry 1.

There was a question which was the flagship of the WG&A fleet. The big, new ship of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation which arrived in 1996 (and which was originally meant to be the new flagship of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation had there been no merger) was given the number “12”. Initially, both the SuperFerry 10 and SuperFerry 12 held the premier Manila-Cebu, v.v. route which was the indication of which is the flagship. SuperFerry 10, however, is bigger than SuperFerry 12, she was no less luxurious or stunning and their speeds were about equal. They might have been actually co-flagships.

3327474725_ff71e9814c_z.jpg

SuperFerry 10 model (Credits to WG&A and Triztan Mallada)

In WG&A, her accommodation class designations were changed. It was now Economy, Tourist, Business Class, Stateroom and Suite. The last two had to be purchased now on a per-room basis and no longer by person basis. There were also changes in the passage rates. The Economy class became more expensive but the highest classes got cheaper.

In later years, SuperFerry 10 was removed from the Manila-Cebu route and she was paired in rotation with SuperFerry 1 and SuperFerry 8 in the express Manila-Iloilo-General Santos City-Davao route. Later, she was paired with SuperFerry 6 in that route and in other routes like the Manila-Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route. All three had about the same passenger capacity and size and about the same speed too, the bases then for the pairing practice of WG&A. The pairing was a way to maintain the same Manila departures for long routes without resorting to the use of the ship on a short voyage (like a Manila-Iloilo or a Manila-Bacolod route) for the duration of the week. This was most acute in the Davao route where one complete voyage takes five days.

After six years, the merger of the William, Gothong and Aboitiz shipping companies broke apart. The Gothong and Chiongbian (of William Lines) families pulled out from WG&A one after the other. To pay off the divestments, ships (both passenger and cargo) had to be liquidated and sold. This started the one-way trip of WG&A and Cebu Ferries Corporation or CFC (their regional subsidiary) ships to the ship breakers and mainly in China. And, sadly, these were ships that were still in good condition and perfectly sailing as WG&A was really good in ship maintenance through WG&A Jebsens which was the former (and later after the break-up) Aboitiz Jebsens.

Among the casualties of these liquidations, very sadly, was Mabuhay 1 or SuperFerry 10. Together with the Our Lady of Akita 2 (the former Maynilad) and the Our Lady of Naju, they were sent as a batch to a China ship breaker. She was broken up on September of 2002 when she was still a good and reliable ship and just sailing for 9 years here. I just wonder why the divesting partners were not just paid in ships. That move would have been able to preserve our good and great liners instead of them becoming ugly scrap metal.

3339257725_cf01399b1c_o-1.gif

From http://www.greenshipspotting.com

And that was the inglorious end of the beautiful and great liner Mabuhay 1, a casualty of a wrong turn in Philippine shipping which was the “Great Merger” that in the end only resulted in the liquidation of two great shipping companies. If that did not happen, I am pretty sure the Mabuhay 1 and the William Lines fleet would have been living until the new millennium and who knows, maybe until now.

When An Overnight Ship Not High On The Cebu Totem Pole Of Ships Became Highly Regarded in Batangas

Before 2009, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) already had a problem with their Asia Hongkong as it was no longer that reliable. This ship had quadruple engines and to transfer the power generated by that two synchronizers are used. As said in the mechanical world, more complications means more possibility of failure. Or more maintenance and probably more trouble. Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was not lucky with that kind of arrangement with their sister ships Trans-Asia and Asia China which happened to have quadruple Niigata engines too. Sulpicio Lines was not lucky too with that kind of arrangement with the quadruple Pielsticks of their Princess of New Unity.

Asia Hongkong was sold to Montenegro Shipping Lines, Inc. of Batangas and this company has the patience and the resources to nurse back ailing ships to become reliable once more. And after half a year of so and after some unreliability early on they were able to nurse back Asia Hongkong which was now known as the Reina del Rosario. As Asia Hongkong this ship was not highly rated in Cebu which has a lot of good overnight ships, the type where this ship belongs. Ahead of her then in Cebu was nearly 20 overnight ship better than her. And so when news filtered back to Cebu that Reina del Rosario was well-appreciated in Batangas, it drew some laughs.

The problem actually lies in Batangas shipping. For too long they did not really invest in good overnight ships. For distances and voyage durations that last half a night including loading time and waiting, they will make do with benches and just let passengers try to curl in there or else hang their heads on the bench ahead of them. A survey of their passengers at midnight is a scene of various levels of discomfort and lack of sleep.

This problem started during the time of the dominance of Viva Shipping Lines. For overnight routes they will use ships simply equipped with benches and very poor toilet facilities. It took for Paciencio Balbon of MARINA to end this after a long struggle. Even after Viva Shipping Lines sank, their successors never learned how to make their passengers more comfortable. Or to really learn and invest in passenger service. Well, they will even skimp on ships’ scantlings just to save a little money. For me, it is obvious they don’t really care for the passengers’ comfort.

Meanwhile, since there is competition in Cebu and there is pride among the shipping owners, the ships of Cebu were better in everything. From the very start there is a Suite Class or at the very least a First Class Cabin. Those classes were completely foreign in Batangas then. If Cebu overnight ships have restaurants, in Batangas the highest equivalent will be a small kiosk with no meals offered. And they do not know how to spell “lounge” in Batangas because it simply cannot be found there then. If there is a front desk in Cebu ships, there is none of that in Batangas ships. Ask for linen (beddings) or towel, well, they have never heard of that in Batangas.

In Cebu, when they use a small RORO as an overnight or night ferry they will try to convert part of the accommodations equipped with bunks. And even have a small, airconditioned Tourist section. Well, if a ship arrives early, they won’t force you down. It is your free “lodging” until you wake up. That is not the practice in Batangas ships.

That was the reason why Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario, an old ship not high in Cebu rankings got appreciated in Batangas. Suddenly, Batangas passengers learned there is something better. And the aircon is even cooler. This was the time the Cebu Ferries were not yet Batangas Ferries. Now when that trio came, they easily set new standards in Batangas shipping, a standard that has not yet been matched until now. But before they came, Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario set the new standards in comfort among Batangas ships.

Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario started her career in Japan as the Hakodate Maru No. 10 of Hakodate Shosen KK. She was once a ferry connecting Hokkaido island to the main island of Honshu (ferries are now gone there when the tunnel was built). This ferry was built Narasaki Zosen in their Muroran yard in 1971 but it was Hakodate Dock that completed the ship. The ship is a RORO (Roll On, Roll Off) ship with bow and stern ramps for loading vehicles on the single-level car deck. The ship originally has only one passenger deck with the bridge on a deck higher than that. The ship has no full scantling in Japan.

Hakodate Maru No. 10 has a raked stem and a transom stem, two masts and two funnels. The external dimensions are 82.8 meters length over-all (LOA), 76.2 meters length between perpendiculars (LBP) and a breadth (B) of 14.0 meters. The original gross register tonnage (GRT) was 1,034 and the original deadweight tonnage (DWT) was 1,495. Her four Niigata engines totalled 5,320 horsepower and her top speed was 17 knots when new. She has about 300 lane-meters of rolling cargo space. Her permanent ID is IMO 7109465.

In 1978, she was sold to Higashi Nippon Ferry KK, a source of many ships that came to the Philippines including the Asia Brunei of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. After 10 more years, she was sold to the Philippines and she became the Asia Korea of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. In refitting, the scantling and deck was extended to the stern and a second passenger deck was added. Initially, the second deck was not extended full to the stern and it served a poop deck and observation deck. And in line with Trans-Asia’s common design, a barbecue place was built there next to the canteen and restaurant (these are two separate facilities in Trans-Asia Shipping Company.

With the extensions the gross tonnage of the ship rose to 1,842 and with further extensions this eventually rose to 2,093 with the net tonnage now 1,350. The passenger capacity then rose to 784 with the majority of it in Economy class. The deadweight tonnage (DWT) was practically unchanged (this does not necessarily change). However, her speed was down to about 15 knots due to age and the added weight.

The ship became a four-class ship with Suite, First Class Cabin, Tourist and the usual open-air Economy for the masses. The new deck and the extension of the first or lower deck became the Economy sections. An upper-class restaurant and a lounge was also present in the airconditioned portion that held the higher classes. The barbecue place, canteen and restaurant near the poop deck was open for all (after all barbecue is always a hit among Visayans).

Asia Korea was not the usual overnight ferry ship of Cebu because its original route was Cebu-Iloilo-Zamboanga-General Santos City (and that explains her accommodations and amenities that were later appreciated in Batangas). That was the time when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines still had long routes. Her role was actually that of a multi-day liner much like the Asia Japan which came in the same year as Asia Korea that had a Cebu-Dumaguete-Dapitan-Zamboanga route. This was also the time when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was still a Zamboanga player in the passenger segment of the market.

Later, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines withdrew from their long routes and she was assigned to the other major routes of the company. Heading into the mid-1990’s, the shipping competition was getting fierce as there was optimism in the shipping sector and many invested when President Fidel Ramos rolled out his liberation and modernization program. In her original route she was being slowly squeezed by the superior liners coming from Manila especially in the Iloilo-Zamboanga-General Santos segment and cargo in her route from Cebu to Zamboanga or vice-versa is not that strong.

Withdrawn from her route she was assigned to the different major routes of the company as Trans-Asia Shipping Lines also rotate their ships. But to avoid confusion let it be said that this is a different ship from the smaller Asia South Korea which grounded and sank near Bantayan island. Actually to avoid confusion Asia Korea was renamed as the Asia Hongkong.

In the latter days with Trans-Asia Shipping Lines when her engines are no longer that strong Asia Hongkong was assigned the shorter Tagbilaran-Cagayan de Oro route of the company which was probably the shortest remaining route of the company then.

In 2009 she was sold to Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) and she was renamed as the Reina del Rosario and officially under that company early on but currently she is now under their legal-fiction company Marina Ferries Inc. In that twin company, as an overnight ferry company, she is usually assigned the overnight Batangas-Odiongan route although at times she can be found on other routes.

Her passenger capacity rose again to 930 with internal modifications. Her usual maintained speed is 11-12 knots. I just wonder if in Batangas people realize she is the sister ship of the dead San Lorenzo Ruiz of the defunct Sto. Domingo Shipping Lines, a legal-fiction company of Viva Shipping Lines which was the Hakodate No. 11 in Japan. The scantling of that ship was not full so the resemblance is not that great. The San Lorenzo Ruiz was gone in the early 2000’s with the bankruptcy of her company. For clarity, let is be said that this ship is different from the San Lorenzo Ruiz, a liner of the Negros Navigation Company.

Reina del Rosario is now a reliable ship as her new owner is good in maintaining old ships and have the resources to lengthen their lives. She is the biggest ship in Montenegro Shipping Lines/Marina Ferries which is a testament that Cebu ferries are bigger than Batangas ferries.

I guess Batanguenos (and Romblomanons) will still be seeing her for a long time. Well, unless Art Tugade gets his way and treat ships as if their lifespan are just as good as the buses, wrongly.

[Photo from a framed TASLI photo.]