The MARINA “Magic Meter”

The MARINA “Magic Meter” is not something that can be found in a dictionary or a reference book. This is just a term by some ship spotters to describe the syndromes where:

  1. Ships from Japan will be modified and structures or scantlings are added and yet the Gross Tonnage (GT) which is a measure of the volume of the ship will stay the same/unchanged or like Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not” the GT will even go down! Or less worse, the GT will remain the same. And much less worse, the GT will marginally increase.

  2. Another variation is some of the ships (passenger and cargo) will have unmodified superstructures and yet again the GT will go down too.

  3. Still another variation is the length and/or the breadth of the ship will go down and along with it the GT (and Net Tonnage) of the ship will go down. This is the Philippine version of “shrinking” a ship without it being brought to a kiln drier.

The MARINA “Magic Meter” is of course not available for free. Like many “accommodations” in government, some kind of “transaction” has to take place. Otherwise, it would not happen. For a company to benefit, of course, the regulating agency personnel has to benefit too. With less GT, benefits can accrue like less docking cost, less towing cost (use of tugs), less insurance cost maybe and some other cost-saving benefits. Ask any nautical designer and they will tell you that.

Some companies are very good in the employment of this “tool”. Some else are not that very fond of this. However, one deleterious effect of these shavings is we have so few entries in the first edition of the book, “The Great Passenger Ships of the World” by Frank Heine and Frank Lose which was published in 2010 in Germany. Since they relied on the official GT, and the cut-off is 10,000gt, many of our otherwise-qualified ships were not included. Actually, no ship of Negros Navigation Company was included in that while Aboitiz Shipping Corp., Sulpicio Lines and even Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. have liners included in that book. The Philippine Ships Spotters Society (PSSS) knows because it was the contributor of the Philippine ship photos in that book and in fact because of that contribution PSSS has a complimentary copy of that book.

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I have been asked before which among the liner companies was the most notorious for shrinking the GT. I have been coy before but the actual answer is Negros Navigation Company. Well, figures don’t lie and I am just stating the truth. Their St. Peter The Apostle, St. Joseph The Worker, San Paolo, Mary The Queen, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Ezekiel Moreno, San Lorenzo Ruiz, Princess of Negros, Sta. Florentina and Sta. Maria all had lower GTs here compared to when they were in Japan. And we all know all of them had added structures. If we go by official figures, it would be the Sta. Ana that will be their biggest ship outside of St. Michael The Archangel because it is one of the very few ships of Negros Navigation which showed increased GT after modification here. And nobody in his right mind would claim Sta. Ana was the second-biggest ship ever of Negros Navigation Company.

If comparisons of liners’ GTs between different shipping companies are made the more this will be a stuff of laughing sessions. Like the sister ships SuperFerry 2 and SuperFerry 5 made it to the book of Frank Heine and Frank Lose but the sister ships St. Peter The Apostle and St. Joseph The Worker both did not because the NENACO ships are just a little over half the size of the two Aboitiz Transport System (ATS) liners, officially (guffaw!). And the smallest original Aboitiz liner, the SuperFerry 3 is significantly bigger than the Mary, Queen of Peace, also officially. Can anybody believe that? I can make other comparisons but NENACO might cringe and sue me (they shouldn’t, they are the biggest liner company now).

Maybe many will guess that the much-maligned Sulpicio Lines is also a big violator in GT shavings, too. Well, not that much really. Only the Philippine Princess, Surigao Princess and Cagayan Princess showed declines in GT while structures were added while Princess of the Pacific, Manila Princess and Boholana Princess GTs remained the same when the three all had additional structures. Meanwhile, the old Aboitiz Shipping Corporation played it straight – all the GTs of their modified ships rose, as should be. Later, as WG&A and ATS, all the GT of their acquired ships from abroad increased too when structures were added. That also goes true for their subsidiary Cebu Ferries Corporation.

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For William Lines, the GTs of Dona Virginia, Manila City, Ozamis City, Tacloban City and the first Zamboanga City all declined. For Sweet Lines, they played generally straight although the GT increases were minimal. If the GT declined, it was the work of the previous local owner before they acquired it. The old Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. (CAGLI) was also good in the shaving game. Among their ships that showed GT declines while structures were added were the Our Lady of Akita, Our Lady of the Rule, Our Lady of Fatima, Our Lady of Lourdes, Our Lady of Guadalupe, Ozamis Bay 1 and Butuan Bay 1.

Among the major Cebu regional shipping companies, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) and Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) also played it straight generally. If scantlings were added then the GTs rose, as it should. The others, well, it seemed on some of their ships they tried to make savings through shavings (pun intended) and that included the defunct Viva Shipping Lines of Batangas. Starlite Ferries and Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) were, however, generally honest.

One effect of these shavings is some ferries that should be over 1,000 gross tons have less than 1,000 gross tons officially. That means they are not in the list of Shippax International, a European database and publisher when they should be. In Bicol, however, there are ships which should be less than 1,000 gross tons that are over 1,000 gross tons. Before there was a rule that ferries over 1,000 gross tons can sail in Typhoon Signal Number 1. And so they bloated the GTs of their ships!

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This shaving of GT is not much of a phenomenon in the smaller ships including the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs. If there was a shaving it generally happened this way – there were added structures but the GT simply did not move. And adding some structures are generally done in these ships to add some passenger space. That was the style of shaving there. Anyway, one problem maybe is there might not be people in MARINA who can compute GTs and NTs. They have more lawyers than marine engineers and what they know to compute are legal fees and dues on the ships and shipping companies. Yes, they studied fuzzy math in college.

In cargo ships, the shavings are less common. They usually don’t add structures unlike in the ferries and they just declare the Japan GTs (not in Aleson Shipping though whose local GTs of cargo/container ships are generally higher than its Japan GTs). However, some cargo ships add some extensions in the stern for the crew’s benefit. Usually this is not reflected in GT increase. Tankers and tugs follow the pattern of the cargo ships. These don’t add scantlings and decks and they just declare the Japan GT.

It is in the liner sector where shavings are the greatest. There are some liners that the true GTs are really so far off the actual GTs. However, most of that is rectified now since most of the liners came from Aboitiz Transport System. That shipping company was generally honest in GTs and the GTs were retained under 2GO.

Meanwhile, in recent years, LCTs are coming from China that have high GTs. The liners that came here that went to China first have high GTs too compared to their Japan GTs. Well, who knows if it is the correct one? Like I believe the assertion of a PSSS Moderator-mariner who said the 7,878gt of the 157-meter long, 4-deck SuperFerry 19 is too low.

When will be the time all our ships will have accurate and reliable GTs? The answer is I don’t know.

vinz

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The Third Filipinas Maasin

The Filipinas Maasin is a line of ships of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) bearing the same name. The current, existing Filipinas Maasin that almost everyone knows is actually the third in that line. It is the first RORO (Roll On, Roll Off) Filipinas Maasin and the biggest in the series. Maybe it can also be added that she was the best in the three.

The first Filipinas Maasin was the third-ever ship of Cokalong Shipping Lines Inc., which was a hand-me-down cruiser ship from Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) where she was known as the first Trans-Asia. However, the first Filipinas Maasin was renamed to the second Filipinas Tandag after the very first ship of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. bearing that name caught fire in Mactan Channel during the Christmas rush of 1991. This ship was later sold to Roble Shipping Inc. in 1998 where she became the Cebu Diamond. In Japan, she was the Shimaji Maru.

Since there was no Filipinas Maasin (and so they lacked ships) and Cokaliong Shipping Lines names ships from places they are connected (the founders of Cokaliong has Surigao origins) and Surigao ships to Cebu traditionally call on Maasin at it lies near the route, another Filipinas Maasin was procured in 1992. This ship was known in Aboitiz Shipping Corp. by three names – as the second Aklan and the second Ormoc. Since there was much renaming in the ships then that results in confusion she should also be identified by her Japan origins where she was known as the the Yasaka Maru with the IMO Number 5395254 and she was built in 1960. Later she was also sold to Roble Shipping where she became the Leyte Diamond.

The third Filipinas Maasin arrived in 2000, a year after the arrival of her sister ship, the Filipinas Iloilo. Their coming, along with other ROROs was part of the whole-fleet conversion of Cokaliong Shipping Lines into ROROs which began in 1997. That was the reason they consecutively sold the Filipinas Siargao, the Filipinas Tandag and the second Filipinas Maasin.

The third Filipinas Maasin was built as the Utaka Maru in Japan in 1980 with the ID IMO 8014887. She was built by Sanuki Shipbuilding and Iron Works in their Takuma yard. The ship has a steel hull with bow and stern ramps as access to her single-level car deck which is divided in the middle. Hence, she is classified as a RORO (Roll-On, Roll Off) ship. She has two masts but only a single stylized center funnel (and that bisects the car deck into two), a raked stem and a transom stern.

Her external dimensions, as built, is 81.3 meters length-all by 14.8 meters extreme breadth by 4.6 meters depth. The ship’s gross register tonnage (GRT) as built was 999 tons and her load capacity was 250 tons in deadweight tonnage (DWT). She was equipped with two Daihatsu marine diesels of 1,600 horsepower each for a total of 3,200 horsepower. That propelled her to a top sustained speed of 14 knots when she was still new.

In 1992, she was sold to China where she was known as the Zhong Hai No.3. Then she was reconveyed to South Korea the same year where she became a dedicated Jeju ferry. Jeju island is the famed island for vacationers and honeymooners in South Korea. Her name there was Car Ferry Cheju No.3. Cheju is another transliteration equivalent to Jeju but Jeju is the name now more used internationally like when a ferry there capsized and sank.

The ship was taken by Cokaliong Shipping Lines from Busan (formerly known as Pusan), South Korea and was conducted from Aug. 19 to Aug. 26 in 2000. The conduction took double the usual duration because the ship had to take shelter in Ikema Shima island in Japan because of a strong typhoon. A 12-man conduction crew manned the ship during the voyage that ended in Cebu.

Upon refitting, the gross tonnage (GT) of the ship shot up to 2,661 nominal tons with 1,684 nominal tons in net tonnage (NT). The DWT of the ship also rose significantly to 674. As of now the passenger capacity of the ship is 704 in 4 classes: Suite, Cabin, Tourist and Economy. There are only two passenger decks with the upper one all-Economy. The rear of that deck is a poop deck which serves as the viewing deck of the ship.

The upper classes are in the forward section of the lower passenger deck. This ship has a canteen (not a kiosk) in the airconditioned section and it has seats and tables around and this serves the lounge of the ship for the upper classes. At the rear of the lounge are additional bunks of the Economy class. Economy class passengers have also access to the canteen and can also seat themselves at the lounge.

She has two prominent passenger ramps at the stern which leads to two wing-type passenger passageways at each side which has curved blue plastic roofing, a Cokaliong trademark. She also has two side ramps at each side to assist loading and unloading of cargo. In the main, her cargo is not the rolling type but loose and palletized cargo handled by forklifts which she carries aboard. When newly-fielded here her top speed was already down to 13 knots but that was still enough for the Cebu-Maasin-Surigao route.

I have memories of this ship because she was the first-ever ship of Cokaliong that I have sailed with. I was not yet aware of the legendary cleanliness of the Cokaliong Shipping Lines and I was amazed. I have long sailed with liners and she easily beats most especially when there was no WG&A yet. However, I disembarked in Maasin from Surigao as I will transfer to a Manila bus (but that was one experience I half-regretted, the time I was still in the trial and error mode in rides in the eastern seaboard). My main regret was with the bus connection then (I was too early for the buses in Maasin and I did not know Maasin becomes a deserted place when the ship leaves; but things are different now). I just rode Filipinas Maasin because I want to try Cokaliong and the Surigao-Maasin route.

I also recommended this ship to a friend travelling from Davao to Bicol. But I told him not to get Tourist accommodation but only Economy and stay the whole time there at the lounge. The difference in the fares will be enough for the food and drinks ordered at the canteen. When he travelled the first bus from Maasin is already earlier and Filipinas Maasin is already slower and so she arriver later than before. I even warned him not to tarry too long at the port lest the Philtranco bus pass him because it will be another hour of wait with only mosquitoes as company.

In her earlier days, Filipinas Maasin was the main ship of the Cebu-Maasin-Surigao route of the Cokaliong Shipping Lines. It still is somehow but she also got assigned extra routes especially in her weekly off-day schedule.

In the last few years, she got smokey and her speed dropped. That was about the time she and her sister ship was offered for sale (but there were no takers). There was rumors that her engines were no longer that strong and sometimes we noticed she was arriving past her arrival time. But she is not the type that was conking out. Aside from legendary cleanliness Cokaliong Shipping Lines was also known for rigorous maintenance of old ships. Like clockwork their ships will enter the shipyards every two years for drydocking.

Their paint will also not be left tarnished while sailing. That was why I was furious about one article done by a Hongkonger in Shippax International. That idiot who only visited here said the livery choice of Cokaliong was done “to better hide the rust” (actually all his articles of Philippine ship companies was very derogatory save for one). We ship spotters know that is completely baseless and we know Cokaliong takes care of its ships very well. I actually protested to the late Klas Brogren, the Shippax founder who is a friend of PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society). That article on Philippine ships was first offered to a former Moderator of PSSS and he declined but he did not inform me. If he offered that to me instead I would have gladly wrote that article about Philippine ship companies.

Last year, we noticed Filipinas Maasin was taking an unusually long time in Ouano wharf in Mandaue. We later learned she will be re-engined with brand-new Weichai marine diesels from China.

Filipinas Maasin is again sailing now in her old route. Noticeably, the thick smoked has vanished (before her smoke can almost hide a building). She is also a little faster now. We also learned from sources before she and her sister Filipinas Iloilo is off the market now. It seems Cokaliong Shipping Lines will already ride them for the long term. They should, the interior is still good. She does not look worn or aged. No need to waste her like the TASLI ships Trans-Asia and Asia China.

I expect to see her sailing for a long time more.