The Third Filipinas Maasin

The Filipinas Maasin is a line of ships of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) bearing the same name. The current, existing Filipinas Maasin that almost everyone knows is actually the third in that line. It is the first RORO (Roll On, Roll Off) Filipinas Maasin and the biggest in the series. Maybe it can also be added that she was the best in the three.

The first Filipinas Maasin was the third-ever ship of Cokalong Shipping Lines Inc., which was a hand-me-down cruiser ship from Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) where she was known as the first Trans-Asia. However, the first Filipinas Maasin was renamed to the second Filipinas Tandag after the very first ship of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. bearing that name caught fire in Mactan Channel during the Christmas rush of 1991. This ship was later sold to Roble Shipping Inc. in 1998 where she became the Cebu Diamond. In Japan, she was the Shimaji Maru.

Since there was no Filipinas Maasin (and so they lacked ships) and Cokaliong Shipping Lines names ships from places they are connected (the founders of Cokaliong has Surigao origins) and Surigao ships to Cebu traditionally call on Maasin at it lies near the route, another Filipinas Maasin was procured in 1992. This ship was known in Aboitiz Shipping Corp. by three names – as the second Aklan and the second Ormoc. Since there was much renaming in the ships then that results in confusion she should also be identified by her Japan origins where she was known as the the Yasaka Maru with the IMO Number 5395254 and she was built in 1960. Later she was also sold to Roble Shipping where she became the Leyte Diamond.

The third Filipinas Maasin arrived in 2000, a year after the arrival of her sister ship, the Filipinas Iloilo. Their coming, along with other ROROs was part of the whole-fleet conversion of Cokaliong Shipping Lines into ROROs which began in 1997. That was the reason they consecutively sold the Filipinas Siargao, the Filipinas Tandag and the second Filipinas Maasin.

The third Filipinas Maasin was built as the Utaka Maru in Japan in 1980 with the ID IMO 8014887. She was built by Sanuki Shipbuilding and Iron Works in their Takuma yard. The ship has a steel hull with bow and stern ramps as access to her single-level car deck which is divided in the middle. Hence, she is classified as a RORO (Roll-On, Roll Off) ship. She has two masts but only a single stylized center funnel (and that bisects the car deck into two), a raked stem and a transom stern.

Her external dimensions, as built, is 81.3 meters length-all by 14.8 meters extreme breadth by 4.6 meters depth. The ship’s gross register tonnage (GRT) as built was 999 tons and her load capacity was 250 tons in deadweight tonnage (DWT). She was equipped with two Daihatsu marine diesels of 1,600 horsepower each for a total of 3,200 horsepower. That propelled her to a top sustained speed of 14 knots when she was still new.

In 1992, she was sold to China where she was known as the Zhong Hai No.3. Then she was reconveyed to South Korea the same year where she became a dedicated Jeju ferry. Jeju island is the famed island for vacationers and honeymooners in South Korea. Her name there was Car Ferry Cheju No.3. Cheju is another transliteration equivalent to Jeju but Jeju is the name now more used internationally like when a ferry there capsized and sank.

The ship was taken by Cokaliong Shipping Lines from Busan (formerly known as Pusan), South Korea and was conducted from Aug. 19 to Aug. 26 in 2000. The conduction took double the usual duration because the ship had to take shelter in Ikema Shima island in Japan because of a strong typhoon. A 12-man conduction crew manned the ship during the voyage that ended in Cebu.

Upon refitting, the gross tonnage (GT) of the ship shot up to 2,661 nominal tons with 1,684 nominal tons in net tonnage (NT). The DWT of the ship also rose significantly to 674. As of now the passenger capacity of the ship is 704 in 4 classes: Suite, Cabin, Tourist and Economy. There are only two passenger decks with the upper one all-Economy. The rear of that deck is a poop deck which serves as the viewing deck of the ship.

The upper classes are in the forward section of the lower passenger deck. This ship has a canteen (not a kiosk) in the airconditioned section and it has seats and tables around and this serves the lounge of the ship for the upper classes. At the rear of the lounge are additional bunks of the Economy class. Economy class passengers have also access to the canteen and can also seat themselves at the lounge.

She has two prominent passenger ramps at the stern which leads to two wing-type passenger passageways at each side which has curved blue plastic roofing, a Cokaliong trademark. She also has two side ramps at each side to assist loading and unloading of cargo. In the main, her cargo is not the rolling type but loose and palletized cargo handled by forklifts which she carries aboard. When newly-fielded here her top speed was already down to 13 knots but that was still enough for the Cebu-Maasin-Surigao route.

I have memories of this ship because she was the first-ever ship of Cokaliong that I have sailed with. I was not yet aware of the legendary cleanliness of the Cokaliong Shipping Lines and I was amazed. I have long sailed with liners and she easily beats most especially when there was no WG&A yet. However, I disembarked in Maasin from Surigao as I will transfer to a Manila bus (but that was one experience I half-regretted, the time I was still in the trial and error mode in rides in the eastern seaboard). My main regret was with the bus connection then (I was too early for the buses in Maasin and I did not know Maasin becomes a deserted place when the ship leaves; but things are different now). I just rode Filipinas Maasin because I want to try Cokaliong and the Surigao-Maasin route.

I also recommended this ship to a friend travelling from Davao to Bicol. But I told him not to get Tourist accommodation but only Economy and stay the whole time there at the lounge. The difference in the fares will be enough for the food and drinks ordered at the canteen. When he travelled the first bus from Maasin is already earlier and Filipinas Maasin is already slower and so she arriver later than before. I even warned him not to tarry too long at the port lest the Philtranco bus pass him because it will be another hour of wait with only mosquitoes as company.

In her earlier days, Filipinas Maasin was the main ship of the Cebu-Maasin-Surigao route of the Cokaliong Shipping Lines. It still is somehow but she also got assigned extra routes especially in her weekly off-day schedule.

In the last few years, she got smokey and her speed dropped. That was about the time she and her sister ship was offered for sale (but there were no takers). There was rumors that her engines were no longer that strong and sometimes we noticed she was arriving past her arrival time. But she is not the type that was conking out. Aside from legendary cleanliness Cokaliong Shipping Lines was also known for rigorous maintenance of old ships. Like clockwork their ships will enter the shipyards every two years for drydocking.

Their paint will also not be left tarnished while sailing. That was why I was furious about one article done by a Hongkonger in Shippax International. That idiot who only visited here said the livery choice of Cokaliong was done “to better hide the rust” (actually all his articles of Philippine ship companies was very derogatory save for one). We ship spotters know that is completely baseless and we know Cokaliong takes care of its ships very well. I actually protested to the late Klas Brogren, the Shippax founder who is a friend of PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society). That article on Philippine ships was first offered to a former Moderator of PSSS and he declined but he did not inform me. If he offered that to me instead I would have gladly wrote that article about Philippine ship companies.

Last year, we noticed Filipinas Maasin was taking an unusually long time in Ouano wharf in Mandaue. We later learned she will be re-engined with brand-new Weichai marine diesels from China.

Filipinas Maasin is again sailing now in her old route. Noticeably, the thick smoked has vanished (before her smoke can almost hide a building). She is also a little faster now. We also learned from sources before she and her sister Filipinas Iloilo is off the market now. It seems Cokaliong Shipping Lines will already ride them for the long term. They should, the interior is still good. She does not look worn or aged. No need to waste her like the TASLI ships Trans-Asia and Asia China.

I expect to see her sailing for a long time more.

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My Samar-Leyte Ship Spotting With Jun Marquez (Part 2)

(Sequel to: https://psssonline.wordpress.com/2016/07/31/my-samar-leyte-ship-spotting-with-jun-marquez/

After San Isidro town we ran at some fast clip to make up for time as we were still very far from Baybay and it was already nearing noon. Along the way, I just pointed to Jun the port in Victoria town of Northern Samar which has motor bancas to Dalupiri island but once that port had a ship to Manila. Running, I was also taking pictures of the buses we encountered along the way. The rain has already become a light drizzle and so my shots had become better. I pointed to Jun there was not really much agriculture in Samar and I told him what was Samar’s diet during the late Spanish times (and now Secretary of Agriculture Pinol wants to make Samar the country’s “vegetable bowl”; supplanting Benguet, Isabela, Nueva Ecija and Bukidnon where people really know how to plant vegetables and where the soil is better?).

After an hour-and-a half of rolling we reached the port of Manguino-o in Calbayog, the port with a RORO connection to Cebu which was just recently developed (one of the parallel ports of Gloria Macapagal Arroyo – two ports serving just one locality). Fortunately, this did not turn into a “port to nowhere” (a port with no ships) because Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. served it (but along the way in the other Calbayog port Palacio Lines sunk). We slowly descended into Manguino-o port and the scene was picturesque. We were lucky a Cokaliong ship, the Filipinas Dinagat was there along with a slew of big fishing bancas or basnigs (some with Masbate registries) and local motor bancas that are ferries. The big fishing bancas were busy loading their catch into styropor boxes with ice. The iced fish will be loaded in the Filipinas Dinagat and will be disposed of in Cebu where the demand is greater and price is higher. With the ferry connection there was no more need for the fishing boats to still go to Maya port in the northern tip of Cebu.

There was an easy atmosphere in the port although the walls and the passenger terminal building were not yet finished. I noticed no hustler hanger-ons nor toughies asking for free fish. The port has a different atmosphere than Calbayog port before which is more tense. The old Samar ports have a long reputation for bullies and thievery. I was glad Manguino-o is starting from a clean slate and Cokaliong Shipping Lines is known for tight control. In my voyage before from Manguino-o port I was able to talk to their port captain who exercised tight grip on the crew at wharf and on the porters. That should be the case everywhere. It also seems the fishing vessels now patronize Manguino-o because this is now the port with connection to Cebu. Departure of the ferry to Cebu from here is in the evening when buses and jeeps contracted by Cokaliong Shipping Lines as shuttles will begin arriving from late afternoon.

From Manguino-o port the private wharf of Samar Coco Products, an oil mill, is visible from a distance across the cove. We didn’t have time to visit it nor we were sure of a welcome and so we just took long-distance shots. There were two ships there then, a Granex steel-hulled freighter and a wooden motor boat that were probably delivering copra. In Manguino-o port the view of the rock formations and the offshore rocks (islets) is really beautiful and it is complemented by the islands offshore. However, we didn’t tarry in the port because of the time pressure. The view of the fish being loaded and the views were already enough enjoyment for the eyes.

After a short drive, we next visited the Calbayog River boat landing area which is accessible after crossing the old bridge spanning Calbayog River. I always liked looking at or visiting this wharf which is adjacent to the market of Calbayog. If one is visiting the old Calbayog port this wharf comes before. What I like here is the jumble of bancas from big to small and from fishing bancas to motor bancas ferries to islands of Samar Sea which is under the jurisdiction of Western Samar. On any given morning their number would be in the dozens. We arrived there before lunch and so there were still many motor banca ferries that were leaving and we were able to take photos of them along with the docked fishing bancas. To save on time and to protect against the heat we just used our vehicle to survey the whole scene. I also pointed out to Jun the passenger terminal for the motor banca ferries.

We then entered the old Calbayog port. They were kind enough to let us in although we have no business except ship spotting. It was already redeveloped but it no longer has a RORO to Cebu because Palacio Lines which has Calbayog origins has already quit (ironically). It had actually no more ferries left. What is has now are a few small cargo ships (two when we visited) and the big fishing bancas that cannot be accommodated in the boat landing area by Calbayog River. I noticed no fish being unloaded (it was nearing noon already) and there was also no cargo being unloaded by the freighters. Except for the presence of the big fishing bancas, Calbayog port was a little desolate.

I also pointed to Jun the locally-built breakwater built by piling stones, the native way. It was good to look at although it is just low. It extends from the boat landing area to the Calbayog port. Me and Jun were comparing it to the gilded breakwater of Enrile and Gigi in Cagayan that cost P4.5 billion and that amount is already enough to build 10 good-sized ports. Yes, if only there is less thievery in government we would have better infrastructure.

We did not stay too long in Calbayog port because of the we were short of time and soon we were on the way to Catbalogan. We passed by Sta. Margarita town, the town with an L-shaped curve along the highway. I don’t know but I find Sta. Margarita beautiful including its coconut groves and its mix of rice field. The road there is good now. Soon we were watching the sea (Samar Sea) and its blend of wonderful seascape which is observable from high from the highway. Soon we were descending to Catbalogan. Jun suggested we bypass Catbalogan port to make up for time. I acceded; it is already a “this one or that one” situation. We had to decide between Catbalogan and Tacloban became it was nearing mid-afternoon and we are not even halfway to Baybay. We thought Tacloban has more importance and we will still have the chance to view the damage of Typhoon “Yolanda”. Catbalogan will be the only major port we will miss on our drive and probably it doesn’t have a good share of ships anyway since it is less active than Calbayog port (but once upon a time this was the most active port in the entire Samar island). It does have a Roble ship though once or twice a week.

We ate at Jollibee again because we already needed food and I needed to recharge the batteries of my camera so I will still have some charge available in Tacloban. It was near 2pm when we left Catbalogan. I had some chance to point out to Jun the important landmarks inside the capital city including the city hall and provincial capitol and soon we were climbing the narrow road out of Catbalogan. The view from the hills of the bay was again magnificent. This time the Samar estuaries and fishponds were more visible and we passed by Jiabong and Buray junction again. In Hinabangan we passed through the diversion road and told Jun of my near-mishap when driving at night at 11pm my engine quit right there (the road was still muddy then). Since it was mostly straights in that part of the Samar highway, we were going at a fast clip. Soon the eatery before San Juanico bridge came into view followed by the junction to Basey, the clear landmark we are already very near San Juanico bridge.

It was already near 4pm when we reached the famous San Juanico bridge. We saw the wrecked DPWH dredger and the damage to the government maritime school (National Maritime Polytechnic) by the bridge. Soon we were in Barangay Anibong, the place of the wrecked ships. It had a playground atmosphere especially it was a Sunday afternoon. There were other visitors including foreigners helping the victims of the typhoon. Me and Jun were talking if the ships can still be saved. I told him it depends. I said all that might be needed are bulldozers to dig a canal so the ships can be towed to open water. But that will mean also bulldozing houses and it might be unacceptable. We moved further on to a point where Tacloban port was visible across the bay but all that can be taken were long-distance shots in the glistening sun.

Soon we were hightailing it to Baybay. The sister of Jun has already followed him up. “What time will you arrive?” was the question. On the way I still took as much pictures as I can while discussing the disaster. Jun pointed out the first-class emergency tents donated by Australia. We saw similar donations from other countries all part of the “1/7th rule” where advanced countries are obliged to send 1/7th of their emergency stockpile when a disaster occurs somewhere in the globe to immediately alleviate suffering and save lives. That was the reason why ships from the USA, Japan, France, etc. immediately arrived in Tacloban and Guiuan, Samar along with cargo planes full of relief goods. The locals and its countrymen cannot understand such kind of response which was the resolution gathered from the Aceh tsunami disaster.

Jun and me was further discussing how long will the crops be productive again. I said for those heavily damaged coconuts it will be two years. I was also discussing the failure of “Project NOAH” of the government along with PAGASA and NDRRMC which looked amateurish (the latter should have gotten typhoon veterans from Bicol). The problem with the government agencies is they were too bilib in PAGASA and so they discounted the shrill warnings of NOAA and Weather Underground of the US which predicted 6 meters waves whereas PAGASA and Project NOAH predicted 6 feet of storm surge (and no need to say who was right). It was the record storm surge that made most of the damage. It was not the 200kph sustained winds at the center of the typhoon.

Dusk was already gathering when we turned past Abuyog. It will be lucky if we will arrive by the 7pm dinner as we still have a mountain to cross. Soon we were in the hills of Mahaplag. It was already dark and there was no chance to savor the mountain views. Then on the descents to Baybay there was a gridlock. A truck laden with a container van hit the electrical wires crossing the street and pulled it down to the road. At first none of the vehicles dared to cross. But with the help of the locals we were able to get through the maze. We were lucky our vehicle was small and crossed to the other side of the highway as the truck was stuck in the middle of the road. But we lost a good 30 minutes. It was already 8pm when we reached the house of Jun’s parents which was located north of Baybay.

Jun’s father was a retired professor of VISCA, the former Visayas State College of Agriculture, a nationally-ranked college of agriculture (it was ranked 4th then, said my brother). Now it is called the Visayas State University (VSU). A ship spotter who is good in ships teaches there and we were scheduled to visit him. Jun’s father speaks good English. As Jun described before, his mother is a Chinese-Filipino. The youngest sister of Jun (who was there and entertained us) and her husband is leaving the next day for a company-sponsored foreign tour. The discussions became more important than the dinner and it covered a wide range of topics.

I was free the next morning since Jun has to send off his sister and brother-in-law. I spent it roaming the city center of Baybay including the market (this portion of the city is not visible from the bus), the bus terminal and the port which were all just adjacent to one another. Like in Ormoc, the bus terminal is right outside the gate of Baybay port but the difference is the wharf of Baybay port is some distance from the gate. The docked ships were Lapu-lapu Ferry 8 and the Sacred Stars.There was not much port activity. That was not the first time I made tambay in that bus terminal. It fascinates me. I am able to gather info and see the public utility vehicle movement and of course also take shots. I like their locally-built jeeps too. Those go to Abuyog and some are the double-tire type. Of course, I also try to taste the local flavors even at the risk of having stomach trouble (but that rarely happens to me).

Before mid-afternoon, me and Jun were ready to visit the Visayas State University instructor and Baybay ship spotter, Mervin Soon who is not that well health-wise. I nearly did not recognize him (I visited him before). But he was still in high fighting spirit. Mervin knows a lot about ships on the eastern seaboard including Bicol since he worked there before. He knows the ships including the defunct ones from the 1990’s and that included Cebu ships since he studied in Cebu (like Jun). I still wanted to interview him about ships but we did not stay too long as our presence is a danger to Mervin and our schedule was already getting tighter as will be revealed later.

I thought Jun will spend the night in Baybay and I will already take the Lapu-lapu Ferry ship that night to Cebu which was not too exciting as I already rode their Sacred Stars before. If that was the case then I would still have plenty of time since the scheduled departure time was still 8pm. If it was the case I was going alone I was even thinking of going to Hilongos to take the ferry there so that might ride will be different and anyway I have not passed through Hilongos before. But Jun had change of plans and he intended to sail that late afternoon via Oceanjet in Ormoc, the last trip for the afternoon. That day was actually the birthday of my son in Cebu and so makakahabol pa somehow if I go with Jun. And so when I called him he was surprised because he was expecting me three days later (on the assumption I will go via Masbate from Allen).

We just had enough time to catch Oceanjet 5 in Ormoc. The line was long, we were nearly full in the vessel. The aircon of Oceanjet 5 was cold and we were at the stern, our choice. But even there near the engine it was comfortable as the NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness) was low. The trip was uneventful and there was nothing much to see because we departed Ormoc when it was beginning to get dark. We arrived in Cebu at 8pm on a night with moderate rain. Jun and me shared the same taxi and we soon parted ways.

I covered more than 1,200 kilometers in 3 days plus a ship ride on the 4th day. It was tiring but I had plenty of photos and memories. It would also turn out to be my last long-distance land trip.

The Dumaguete-Dapitan RORO Connection – A Connection That Took Too Long in Coming

Dumaguete and Dapitan have been blessed with relatively good ports (by Philippine standards) since decades ago because they have Manila connections. True liners and Manila passenger-cargo ships like the former “FS” ships called on them regularly in the past. But what puzzled me is the short-distance RORO connection between them took too long to materialize. Looking at the map, this is the obvious connection point between Mindanao and Negros (and Cebu by extension through the Negros-Cebu connections) because of the relatively short distance (the second shortest after Leyte-Surigao but that is too far away). Compared to the Sorsogon-Samar, Leyte-Surigao and Batangas-Mindoro short-distance ferry connections, the Dumaguete-Dapitan short-distance RORO connection came many, many years too late.

If there was ever a RORO connection before between the two ports, it was the ROROs of the overnight ferries serving the Cebu-Dumaguete-Dapitan route. However, the peculiarity of the Cebu overnight ferry companies is that they stress break-bulk cargo (like those in sacks and cartons) and loose cargo (those not in containers like pieces of GI sheets or rolls of wire) and not rolling cargo (which means vehicles) or containerized cargo. So these Cebu overnight ferry companies like Trans-Asia Shipping Lines, Cokaliong Shipping Lines or George & Peter Lines, to name a few that called on Dumaguete and Dapitan ports didn’t see the need for short-distance ferry-ROROs loading trucks. Maybe that was the reason they did not acquire that type of ferry. But actually it is that type that was really fit for the Dumaguete-Dapitan route and just shuttling between the two ports like what is the practice now.

The Cebu overnight ferry companies which were established later than the three were the ones which saw the need for short-distance ferry-ROROs. The prime example of that is Lite Ferries which had a passenger-cargo LCT at the start and later acquired ROROs in the 40-meter and 50-meter class for dual short-distance and overnight ferry operations. And maybe that is the reason why Lite Ferries is flying high now because they were able to tap a business and a paradigm overlooked by their overnight ferry competitors. Probably this is the reason too for the fast success of a late entrant, the Medallion Transport which started with basic short-distance ferry-ROROs and doing a lone short-distance route. Later they branched into overnight routes using small ROROs. Now they already have true overnight ferry-ROROs.

In comparison, in the Sorsogon-Samar, Leyte-Surigao and Batangas-Mindoro short-distance ferry connections, the shipping companies there started as short-distance ferry companies. They were then able to specialize in this kind of service and type of market which means they carry vehicles almost exclusively including the intermodal buses. Their passengers are mostly passengers of the buses loaded on them. The intermodal trucks they load especially the wing van trucks are long-distance carriers and those eventually developed into the competitors of container shipping with the support of this short-distance ferry-ROROs which became the “bridges” between the islands.

If these short-distance ferry companies have a near-contemporary that tried in that Dumaguete-Dapitan route it was the obscure shipping company Jones Carrier Inc. But that company did not last long as it had too many diverse routes, its ships were too small and old and maybe they were undercapitalized and not strong enough for the long run needed to establish and hold and a new shipping connection. And most likely the presence of the three overnight ferry companies from Cebu also impacted them. On the other hand, I also wonder why the “locals” Maayo Shipping, DIMC Shipping or Tanjuan Shipping which all have routes to or near Dumaguete did not try that route. Or maybe even the nearby Millennium Shipping which just sold its LCTs to Maayo Shipping rather than compete. At the start of a company or route in those earlier times an LCT is enough like what Lite Shipping did in the Argao-Loon route connecting south Cebu and mid-Bohol. But maybe except for the Millennium Shipping of the Floirendos, maybe it is capitalization and lack of vision that was the problem of these Dumaguete ferry companies.

Looking back, maybe it was overnight shipping company Palacio Lines which could have taken advantage of the opportunity offered by the short-distance RORO shipping in this route. They were not unfamiliar with Dumaguete as they had a ship then going to Dumaguete from Tagbilaran and Cebu but it was a cruiser ferry. They were then using their first ROROs on overnight routes much like what the Cebu overnight ferry companies as in concentrating on breakbulk and loose cargo. Maybe if they only looked north and south of them, they might have gotten the idea that short-distance ferry-RORO service is the wave of the future. After all they were a shipping company from Calbayog City in Samar and a little north of that was the Sorsogon-Samar short-distance ferries and down south to them were the Leyte-Surigao short-distance ferries that were both making good. But then they seemed to have been also be too protective of their route to Oroquieta which is not far from Dapitan.

Actually, if one analyzes, it might not only be the overnight ferry companies which might be at fault in the late RORO connection between Dumaguete and Dapitan. For after all, as a general principle, if there is a demand then a supplier responds. But then maybe the shippers were also not aware that there is a better mode than the one they were used to. Actually, the goods from Mindanao sent over that connection eventually find their way to Cebu, the biggest market after Manila. But for too long I noticed the shippers tend to rely on Zamboanga and Ozamis ports. Of course, the bad roads then in the Zamboanga provinces was a hindrance along with the presence of some banditry. So before, Dapitan might have looked too far and unsafe for those from Zamboanga City. And those from Baganian Peninsula, Pagadian and Panguil Bay were too used, too dependent on Ozamis port, their old port of departure (well, with Ozamis, they have a Manila and Dumaguete connection, too).

It took a push from President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo for the Dumaguete-Dapitan connection to come true and hold. Half of the push needed was actually the cementing of the roads of Zamboanga Peninsula. The roads should have been completed much earlier since AusAid (Australian Agency for International Development) is funding the road construction but that stalled for many years because AusAid only wanted to employ Korean construction companies, for quality reasons. However, the local politicians wanted local contractors (for “percentage” reasons, of course). A compromise was worked out and the roads were finally completed (though the Filipino-built sections were obviously substandard). Moreover, the military took control of the mountain pass near Vitali and security was improved after that. After those, travel at night was already possible and that was key to using Dapitan port especially from Zamboanga City. Soon, Dapitan port no longer look too distant. Passengers, instead of waiting for the ship that was not daily even then were soon taking the bus to Dipolog to connect to Dapitan. The trucks followed suit soon, too.

The shipping companies which pioneered the RORO connection between Dumaguete and Dapitan were actually “foreigners”, which mean they were not natives of the area. The first two in the route were the Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC), a Cebu shipping company and Aleson Shipping Lines, a Zamboanga City shipping company. Later, Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) also came and they are a shipping company from Batangas. The common characteristic of the three is they have a good understanding of short-distance ferry shipping, an understanding which was clearly lacking in the earlier Cebu overnight ferry companies. And all three have the type of ROROs needed here, the basic, short-distance ferry RORO which the old Cebu overnight ferry companies simply didn’t have.

Today, all these three shipping companies are still in the Dumaguete-Dapitan route and thriving, adding ships and frequencies. Now, Montenegro Lines and Aleson Shipping have even invaded the Siquijor route using ROROs from Dumaguete and so maximizing their ships and personnel stationed there. Meanwhile, DIMC Shipping, Maayo Shipping and Tanjuan Shipping all seem to have steam and two of them are obviously floundering while another, the Maayo Shipping company was selling off excess ships (the coming of a competitor in their route is the primary reason for that). Palacio Shipping is even gone now as in they are already defunct and their ships have been sold already. Well, talk of a wrong bet, lack of vision and maybe even too much conservatism.

Why would the Dapitan-Dumaguete route hold? Actually, there is plenty of cargo emanating from that portion of Mindanao and going to Central Visayas. After all Cebu is the second biggest market after Manila and it has sea connections to many islands for further distribution of goods. One of the biggest and most valuable produce being sent from way back by Zamboanga Peninsula to Cebu is fish, the frozen and the canned varieties. Most of the frozen fish emanate from the many “pulo”. This is what they call there Basilan, the Pangutaran group, Jolo, the Tawi-tawi group and the many other islands off Zamboanga. The Sangali Fishport, the regional fishport is also located in Zamboanga City and it is there where many basnigs, trawlers and purse seiners fishing in the Moro Gulf unload their catch. Zamboanga City meanwhile is host to seven canneries. Dapitan is now the ports of choice in bringing the frozen fish through fish carrier trucks. However, a ship is still preferred for canned fish as it is heavy. Meanwhile, Spanish sardines in bottles also became a hit produce in the Dipolog area and they use Dapitan port in bringing their goods to the Visayas.

There is also plenty of freshwater and brackish fish from the fishponds of Zamboanga Sibugay especially those located in the marshes of Sibuguey Bay. Meanwhile, fishing vessels catching off Zamboanga del Sur, Lanao del Sur and Maguindanao unload in Pagadian and Tukuran ports and fish carriers pick them up these catches. Practically all of them now use Dapitan port to bring the fish destined for Negros island and Cebu province instead of Ozamis port. This portion of Mindanao has finally discovered the superiority of the intermodal truck (including the intermodal fish carriers) which can deliver goods along the way and not be dependent on distributors or wholesalers. That flexibility and ubiquity was also discovered by the company and distributor trucks from Cebu. Instead of just relying on distributors based in Ozamis City like before, their trucks now normally roll to up to Ipil, the capital and trade center of Zamboanga Sibugay and along the way they deliver their products to the markets, stores and groceries. Now, there are even intermodal buses with routes from the Visayas to Zamboanga City. First to roll was the Bacolod-Zamboanga Ceres Lines bus and recently they also have a Cebu-Zamboanga bus service too.

In recent years, it is obvious that the Dapitan-Dumaguete route has impacted the Cebu-Zamboanga and Cebu-Sindangan routes heavily. There is now just one regional passenger ship left sailing the Zamboanga-Cebu route, the Zamboanga Ferry of George & Peter Lines where before Trans Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) and George & Peter Lines put emphasis in that route. There is also one liner of 2GO from Dumaguete and Manila, a liner route that was previously abandoned. Meanwhile, Cokaliong Shipping Lines has already abandoned the Cebu-Sindangan route.

Intermodal trucks rolling long distances to other parts of Mindanao and Negros island also use this connection and some even go as far as Panay island. This is especially true after the liner service to Southern Mindanao was halted by Aboitiz Transport System (ATS). With that halt, the shippers of Southern Mindanao also began rolling their trucks. Private vehicles running to or from Cebu to Mindanao also use this connection since the rolling rate from Cebu to Ozamis, Iligan and Cagayan de Oro is very high (rolling sea rates by kilometer is far, far higher than rolling a vehicle in the highway). And again, rolling cargo is not the specialization or priority of the overnight ferries. For many, this western route is preferred over the eastern route that passes through Leyte and Surigao unless the destination or origin is eastern Mindanao or southern Mindanao.

Unless threatened by the direct Samboan-Dapitan route (or a possible Samboan-Dipolog route), the Dumaguete-Dapitan route will continue to grow.

That we will have to see in the future.