The Remaining Cruiser Ferries of Cebu Port

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The cruiser era is near to drawing to a close in the Philippines, maybe. Cruisers might hold on to Zamboanga but I don’t know anywhere else. In the Port of Cebu they might have been gone now except for three hold-outs, the Lapu-lapu Shipping, Gabisan Shipping and South Pacific Transport which don’t operate ROROs. But recent rumor say Gabisan will sell one of its cruisers, either the Gloria Two or Gloria Three and in its place will come the former Maharlika Cinco of Archipelago Philippine Ferries which supposedly will become the Gloria V in their fleet. This ferry is now undergoing renovation and refitting in Leyte and she is a big one. Seems Gabisan Shipping also wants a slice of the growing rolling cargo traffic to Leyte using Hilongos port.

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The cruiser ferries of Lapu-lapu Shipping, the Lapu-lapu Ferry 1, Lapu-lapu Ferry 8 and Rosalia 3 are really fighting very hard. From simple tejeras they now have bunks and even a Tourist section. They have been pressured by the coming of Montenegro Shipping Lines to Cataingan, Masbate, their old staple but they did not budge. They are even pressured more in Baybay City by Roble Shipping. They have already withdrawn from the Villaba, Leyte route. As cruisers they have nowhere to go; they have to dig in their heels and try to survive all the onslaughts.

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The five cruiser ships of Lapu-lapu Shipping and Gabisan Shipping are all bunched up between Pier 2 and Pier 3 of Cebu port and many times they dock diagonally to save up on limited wharf space. Sometimes they are joined by a Gemini ship of Isla de Bantayan Shipping. But these Geminis are not really passenger-cargo ships.

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Also still present in Cebu port are the two cruiser ferries of South Pacific Transport, the South Pacific and Fiji-II which have a route to Bato, Leyte. These ships are known that will never give up because they are owned by Fortune ShipWorks, a shipyard in Tayud which has also a freighter company and will live as long as the owners want them.

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Docking not far from the seven is the VG 1 (and the former Andy Two) of VG Shipping which has a route to Talibon, Bohol. This lady is an old survivor from being the Princess of Samar of the defunct Western Samar Shipping Lines and as the Princess Joan of the defunct Georgia Shipping Lines. I don’t know right now if she was the former Joan Glory of the defunct Glory Shipping Lines. She is re-engined with Weichai from Dynamic Power now so it means she will still be around for a while.

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I am not sure if the Super Island Express II of Island Shipping has already quit or was replaced. She is also a cruiser ferry and has a route to Tubigon, Bohol. Once upon a time Island Shipping has a big presence in the Tubigon route until slowly they were pushed by the ROROs of Lite Ferries and the cruisers of Jadestar Shipping which are gone now, which surrendered the fight when they realized their cruisers cannot match the ROROs of Lite Ferries and the fastcrafts of Star Crafts.

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I don’t know if Island Shipping will attempt a comeback. They have enough ROPAX LCTs now. They even sold their Island RORO II which they should have used to hold their Tubigon route, in my view. This became the VG RORO II of VG Shipping.

Rose Shipping/V. Atilano with its cruiser ferries is now gone too. And to think in its heyday they have been involved in wars across the Camotes Sea versus the Aboitiz Shipping Corporation which is also gone now. What a sad end and it seems it is only their April Rose and Yellow Rose which has survived in other hands. However, only Yellow Rose is remaining in Cebu but not sailing. Her last duty was as restaurant-tour ship with the name Lady of the Gate of JJA Transport.

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Aside from Jadestar Shipping, another recent casualty which quit was the Roly Shipping/Godspeed Shipping/Ernesto Alvarado combine. I thought they will survive somehow as they have a more diversified route system (Leyte and Bohol) but I heard there were internal difficulties and one day they were just gone like Jadestar. Their Roly-1 capsized in a shipyard and their Tagbilaran Ferry and Mega Asiana were cannibalized in Star Marine Shipyard in Tayud, Cebu and are technically dead ships.

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Maypalad Shipping meanwhile had a very slow death. Their tied-up ships in Mactan Channel disappeared slowly over several years but as of last count two freighters are still there and their Samar Star is still in Star Marine Shipyard but this is an early generation RORO. Their Guiuan, however was a cruiser ferry. It is now gone.

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Another solitary cruiser that is still tied up is the Ormoc Star of Roble Shipping which is still in Pier 7 but it seems it is no longer in sailing condition. A few years ago, the Melrivic Ten which has a route to Poro, Camotes also quit and was sold to shipping company that has a Cuyo route from Manila. Melrivic Nine has quit the Toledo-San Carlos route and is laid up in Dunggo-an, Danao City. I wonder if owner Aznar Shipping will want to use her revive their Cebu-Poro route.

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So Cebu Port has just some ten cruiser ferries surviving now but not all are in sailing condition and some might be technically dead ships now (intact but no longer capable of sailing). There are however cruiser ferries on the western side of Cebu island under the hands of Island Shipping and PAR Transport. Those are still sailing.

Take your views and pictures of them now. Who knows if they will still be around in a decade’s time. For sure, when they go, there will no longer be cruiser replacements. The replacements, if ever there will be any, will for sure be ROROs. If not, LCTs which are booming now.

This is a tribute to them. I cannot say “Long live” because I know they will be gone in a few years time. For sure.

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A Small RORO Ship With A Cruiser Stern

A basic, short-distance ferry-RORO with a cruiser stern is indeed rare as most of those type have transom sterns. But such is the case of the VG RORO II. And for a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO of barely 30 meters length, an airconditioned Tourist section with bunks is another rarity (so I wonder if she should still be called “basic”). The reason for that is she doubles as a night ferry (“overnight ferry” is too much of a term because of the short distance she sails to Bohol along with just a few hours of sailing time).

It is in Camotes Sea and Bohol Strait where I noticed that there is a proliferation of small ferries that have night or overnight accommodations and VG RORO II is one of them. In other regions, night routes might last 4-6 hours but there are no bunks so passengers try to fit themselves into benches (and this leads to arguments many times). That is the negative specialty of Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI). Maybe they should attend a seminar aboard small, night ships to Bohol and Leyte to see where they are failing in passenger service.

The VG RORO II is one of the two remaining sailing ships of VG Shipping Lines (the other one is Andy Two). She first started out as the Ferry Oseto of The Yellow Sea Merchant Company in Japan. The Ferry Oseto was built by the Mukai Zosensho YK in their yard in Nagasaki, Japan in 1978. She measures just 34.0 meters by 8.6 meters with a depth of 2.9 meters which are typical measurements for a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO. Her Gross Tonnage (GT) is 196 nominal tons and she has a Net Tonnage of 96 nominal tons.

A steel-hulled ship, Ferry Oseto has the typical single RORO ramp of a basic-short-distance ferry-RORO at the bow and a single car deck with a single passenger deck above that. As mentioned, her stern is cruiser and she has just a single mast. The ship is equipped with a single Daihatsu engine of 750 horsepower rating which gave her an original top speed of 10.5 knots. Her IMO Number is 7740233 but she has the alternate ID Number 17989.

In 2004, Ferry Oseto was sold to Island Shipping Corporation, the Bantayan island specialists. In that company she was known as the Island RORO II and her route was from Hagnaya port in San Remigio town in Cebu island to Sta. Fe port in Bantayan island. In that route, she was used as a basic short-distance ferry-RORO to Bantayan island which has a booming tourism and table egg business and is a favorite weekend jaunt of Cebuanos.

After a few years, Island Shipping Corporation decided to sell the ship to VG Shipping Lines of Cebu, a shipping company doing routes between Cebu and Talibon, an alternate port of entry in northern Bohol to Tubigon port, the main port of entry in that part of Bohol. Initially, there was not a change of name. Rumor said VG Shipping Lines was loath to pay MARINA, the shipping regulatory agency of the Philippines the required fees which is no small amount (yes, all signatures in MARINA has a corresponding fee and usually that is accompanied by an amount which is not reflected in the official receipt).

It seems Island Shipping Corporation decided to sell her because more and more what they want to use in the Bantayan route are their Cargo RORO LCTs which have higher rolling cargo capacity and that means more vehicles can be loaded. Vehicles are actually the bigger source of revenue in RORO shipping (which means it is not the passengers). The ship is operated by VG Shipping Lines but the database says the registered owner is Vicenta vda. de Garcia, the matriarch and from whom the shipping company was named. Currently the ship is already named the VG RORO II.

Although small, VG RORO II is a comfortable ship. Her Economy seats in the upper deck are not benches or single fiberglass seats (the “cruel seat” forte of Lite Shipping and Roble Shipping). Instead they use garden chairs which are softer, wider and have arm supports. Those are fixed to the floors with sufficient spacing. At the back of these are open-air Economy bunks with mattresses. So passengers really have a choice.

The ship also has an Economy section at the mezzanine between the upper aft Economy section and the small car/cargo deck at the forward section of the ship. That section is equipped with simple plastic benches and it is a little bit dark but airy especially when the ship is already underway. This section divides into two the lower portion of the ship.

Between the Economy section at the stern and the bridge, there is a small airconditioned Tourist section equipped with bunks and mattresses. It seems this was the original passenger accommodation in Japan if judging by its windows. For weary shoppers or traders who spent their day crisscrossing Metro Cebu this section is a welcome respite and an early rest area.

The ship has only a small car/cargo deck because the aft or rear portion of the car deck was converted into an additional passenger section. This has plastic bench seats and a few tables which can be used for eating or sightseeing. A stair connects this to the upper Economy section and in between them a kiosk is located near the smokestack (the ship has a single center funnel).

The ship leaves for Talibon at 9pm and departs Talibon for Cebu at 2pm the next day. The entire voyage takes less than three hours and usually before 5pm she will already be in Mactan Channel. In Talibon, it seems she is a “free hotel” for the non-residents passengers after she arrives there at midnight.

Many of her cargo are not rolling cargo but breakbulk or loose cargo. She also takes in a few vehicles, however, when some show. These are the vehicles going to or from northeastern Bohol which find Tubigon too far or which find the schedule of VG RORO II more convenient for them. She is the only RORO ship serving Talibon port. In Cebu she docks in Pier 4 just across the venerable Gothong Building.

The ship is not equipped with forklifts. In loading or unloading, the trucks bringing in the cargo just enters the ship so true porters can handle it. If it is too heavy then the arrastre should bring in the forklift. After all they have already been paid for the cargo handling. Company forklifts normally do most of this job so as to speed up loading and unloading and so that there will be less damaged items. Arrastre in most places should simply just be dissolved as they just act as a tong collection agency. Sometimes their only job is to put the ropes on the bollards and remove it when the ship is leaving and make some strange signs and yells to the drivers. Yet shippers and truckers pay for their “services”.

Sometimes I notice this ship gets a little rusty. Maybe the revenues are not enough for a new coat of paint. However, she is clean inside and the crew are friendly. Moreover, she is not known for conking out at sea and those are the more important things.

I wish she will sail on for long time. And be an example to other shipping companies that passengers deserve better than hard seats on night voyages even though it is just short.