A Small RORO Ship With A Cruiser Stern

A basic, short-distance ferry-RORO with a cruiser stern is indeed rare as most of those type have transom sterns. But such is the case of the VG RORO II. And for a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO of barely 30 meters length, an airconditioned Tourist section with bunks is another rarity (so I wonder if she should still be called “basic”). The reason for that is she doubles as a night ferry (“overnight ferry” is too much of a term because of the short distance she sails to Bohol along with just a few hours of sailing time).

It is in Camotes Sea and Bohol Strait where I noticed that there is a proliferation of small ferries that have night or overnight accommodations and VG RORO II is one of them. In other regions, night routes might last 4-6 hours but there are no bunks so passengers try to fit themselves into benches (and this leads to arguments many times). That is the negative specialty of Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI). Maybe they should attend a seminar aboard small, night ships to Bohol and Leyte to see where they are failing in passenger service.

The VG RORO II is one of the two remaining sailing ships of VG Shipping Lines (the other one is Andy Two). She first started out as the Ferry Oseto of The Yellow Sea Merchant Company in Japan. The Ferry Oseto was built by the Mukai Zosensho YK in their yard in Nagasaki, Japan in 1978. She measures just 34.0 meters by 8.6 meters with a depth of 2.9 meters which are typical measurements for a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO. Her Gross Tonnage (GT) is 196 nominal tons and she has a Net Tonnage of 96 nominal tons.

A steel-hulled ship, Ferry Oseto has the typical single RORO ramp of a basic-short-distance ferry-RORO at the bow and a single car deck with a single passenger deck above that. As mentioned, her stern is cruiser and she has just a single mast. The ship is equipped with a single Daihatsu engine of 750 horsepower rating which gave her an original top speed of 10.5 knots. Her IMO Number is 7740233 but she has the alternate ID Number 17989.

In 2004, Ferry Oseto was sold to Island Shipping Corporation, the Bantayan island specialists. In that company she was known as the Island RORO II and her route was from Hagnaya port in San Remigio town in Cebu island to Sta. Fe port in Bantayan island. In that route, she was used as a basic short-distance ferry-RORO to Bantayan island which has a booming tourism and table egg business and is a favorite weekend jaunt of Cebuanos.

After a few years, Island Shipping Corporation decided to sell the ship to VG Shipping Lines of Cebu, a shipping company doing routes between Cebu and Talibon, an alternate port of entry in northern Bohol to Tubigon port, the main port of entry in that part of Bohol. Initially, there was not a change of name. Rumor said VG Shipping Lines was loath to pay MARINA, the shipping regulatory agency of the Philippines the required fees which is no small amount (yes, all signatures in MARINA has a corresponding fee and usually that is accompanied by an amount which is not reflected in the official receipt).

It seems Island Shipping Corporation decided to sell her because more and more what they want to use in the Bantayan route are their Cargo RORO LCTs which have higher rolling cargo capacity and that means more vehicles can be loaded. Vehicles are actually the bigger source of revenue in RORO shipping (which means it is not the passengers). The ship is operated by VG Shipping Lines but the database says the registered owner is Vicenta vda. de Garcia, the matriarch and from whom the shipping company was named. Currently the ship is already named the VG RORO II.

Although small, VG RORO II is a comfortable ship. Her Economy seats in the upper deck are not benches or single fiberglass seats (the “cruel seat” forte of Lite Shipping and Roble Shipping). Instead they use garden chairs which are softer, wider and have arm supports. Those are fixed to the floors with sufficient spacing. At the back of these are open-air Economy bunks with mattresses. So passengers really have a choice.

The ship also has an Economy section at the mezzanine between the upper aft Economy section and the small car/cargo deck at the forward section of the ship. That section is equipped with simple plastic benches and it is a little bit dark but airy especially when the ship is already underway. This section divides into two the lower portion of the ship.

Between the Economy section at the stern and the bridge, there is a small airconditioned Tourist section equipped with bunks and mattresses. It seems this was the original passenger accommodation in Japan if judging by its windows. For weary shoppers or traders who spent their day crisscrossing Metro Cebu this section is a welcome respite and an early rest area.

The ship has only a small car/cargo deck because the aft or rear portion of the car deck was converted into an additional passenger section. This has plastic bench seats and a few tables which can be used for eating or sightseeing. A stair connects this to the upper Economy section and in between them a kiosk is located near the smokestack (the ship has a single center funnel).

The ship leaves for Talibon at 9pm and departs Talibon for Cebu at 2pm the next day. The entire voyage takes less than three hours and usually before 5pm she will already be in Mactan Channel. In Talibon, it seems she is a “free hotel” for the non-residents passengers after she arrives there at midnight.

Many of her cargo are not rolling cargo but breakbulk or loose cargo. She also takes in a few vehicles, however, when some show. These are the vehicles going to or from northeastern Bohol which find Tubigon too far or which find the schedule of VG RORO II more convenient for them. She is the only RORO ship serving Talibon port. In Cebu she docks in Pier 4 just across the venerable Gothong Building.

The ship is not equipped with forklifts. In loading or unloading, the trucks bringing in the cargo just enters the ship so true porters can handle it. If it is too heavy then the arrastre should bring in the forklift. After all they have already been paid for the cargo handling. Company forklifts normally do most of this job so as to speed up loading and unloading and so that there will be less damaged items. Arrastre in most places should simply just be dissolved as they just act as a tong collection agency. Sometimes their only job is to put the ropes on the bollards and remove it when the ship is leaving and make some strange signs and yells to the drivers. Yet shippers and truckers pay for their “services”.

Sometimes I notice this ship gets a little rusty. Maybe the revenues are not enough for a new coat of paint. However, she is clean inside and the crew are friendly. Moreover, she is not known for conking out at sea and those are the more important things.

I wish she will sail on for long time. And be an example to other shipping companies that passengers deserve better than hard seats on night voyages even though it is just short.

All The Ports of Bohol With Connection to Cebu Are Actually Competing Against Each Other

There are many Bohol ports with connections to Cebu and one way or another, all of them are competing against each other. This is a basic point or truth known by the people of Bohol and Cebu but missed by Myrna S. Austria in her paper on shipping competition. In that paper, she compared the competition of the shipping companies within a route but she completely failed to take account that different routes actually compete and shipping companies on those different shipping routes also compete against each other.

http://dirp3.pids.gov.ph/ris/rps/pidsrp0302.pdf

There are many Bohol ports that have connection to Cebu because simply put Bohol is tethered too to Cebu like Leyte (which I have discussed in another article). Cebu sends its many manufactured goods to Bohol and in return Bohol sends many agricultural produce and products of the sea to Cebu. There are also many Bol-anons that work or study in Cebu. On the other end, there are many Sugbuhanons who visit the many tourist sites of Bohol. In the less developed towns of Bohol where there are no big stores, the people go to Cebu for their needs since the goods are more complete there and cheaper and the fare and cargo rate are reasonable.

The following ports of Bohol have connections to Cebu by steel-hulled ferries at present: Ubay, Tagbilaran, Catagbacan (Loon), Tubigon, Jetafe and Talibon. Aside from steel-hulled ferries, the towns of Jetafe, Talibon and islets off Bohol also have connections to Cebu by big motor bancas. Most of the steel-hulled ferries that connect Cebu and Bohol are RORO (Roll-On, Roll-Off) ships. Hence, they can also carry vehicles aside from passengers. There are also High Speed Crafts (HSCs) that connect Tagbilaran, Tubigon and Jetafe to Cebu. In all these connections there are ferries running day and night.

In decades past, it was Tagbilaran that was the main gateway to Bohol from Cebu. However, in the recent years, it seems Tubigon port has already exceeded Tagbilaran port especially in rolling cargo. Using Tubigon as the port of entry is cheaper and the travel time to there is just half as it is nearer in distance from Cebu. There are also the alternative Lite Ferries LCTs from Ouano in Mandaue to Talibon that caters mainly to rolling cargo. To match that, RORO Cargo LCTs have also been deployed in the Cebu-Tagbilaran route.

Since the main tourist attractions of Bohol are the world-famous RORO Cargo LCT and the Loboc River Cruise (plus SuperCat offers online booking, a feature foreign tourists are accustomed to), the tourists still use Tagbilaran port as entry. But lately Tubigon is also putting a fight for Chocolate Hills because the roads have already gotten better. If before it was only Tagbilaran that have HSCs from SuperCat and Oceanjet now Tubigon already have fastcrafts from Starcrafts and Oceanjet (via the franchise from Lite Ferries). The main competition in Bohol is actually between Tagbilaran and Tubigon ports.

In the northern part of Bohol, Tubigon has competition too from Jetafe and Talibon which are incidentally ports of adjacent towns. The Clemer and other boats are active in the two ports and they have a loyal clientele. A ship from Island Shipping and a RORO from VG Shipping also serve the two ports. The motor bancas and these ROROs serve as alternative if a passenger or shipper is going direct to Jetafe or Talibon or to towns east of the two.

Further east another option is the J&N ROROs to Ubay. But even though these are ROROs, they mainly take break-bulk cargo and passengers. Even then Ubay is competing against the other ports. Actually, Ubay port and Tagbilaran port sank the Cebu connection to Ubay especially when the roads got better and the buses multiplied. The weakness of Jagna as a connection to Cebu is that it is more distant because of the roundabout route.

There is also a RORO connection between Taloot port in Argao, Cebu to Catagbacan port in Loon, Bohol. This serves as alternative for vehicles coming from or going to the southern part of Cebu. With this route they need not go to Cebu City. If the ferry there is unavailable or when like the port was damaged by the big quake in Bohol then Tagbilaran or Tubigon ports become the alternative to this connection.

If the two ports of Tubigon and Tagbilaran are the main competing Bohol ports then all the other ports are alternatives to either of the two. That is simply the situation of the ports in Bohol especially now when the roads of Bohol are more developed and there are plenty of buses running and even into the night. People of Bohol know the permutations of the ship rides and they take what is most convenient or cheapest to them.

For example, if one misses the ferry in Ubay or if it is not running, then one just have to motor to either Talibon or Jetafe and take the ferries there. Similarly, if one misses the Tagbilaran ferry he can also take the bus or van to Tubigon and get a suitable ferry there. These two examples are also applicable to vehicles. Now, if one is short on budget then one can take the cheap ferry to Tubigon and just take the bus to Tagbilaran. If one can’t wait wait for the ferries to Jetafe, Talibon or Ubay, one can just take the Tubigon routes which has more ferries. If one’s town lies between two ports then he can take either route depending on his whims and needs. There are really many possibilities and there are many feasible ports of entries to or ports of departure from Bohol.

But, apparently, if one reads her paper, it seems Myrna S. Austria has no idea or knowledge of that.