Three RORO Companies Now In The Cebu To Surigao Route

Very recently, there are now three RORO companies vying in the route from Cebu to Surigao and vice-versa and for me that is a sea-shaking event but not a tsunami. It was Medallion Transport Inc. which started this thing when they fielded their biggest ship, the Lady of Love in the said route. To be sure she is full, they just charged the rolling cargo rate in the Cebu to Leyte routes and with that they became immediately successful as in their car/cargo deck became filled immediately.

25095920771_ce350abc71_k

Lady of Love by Mike Baylon of PSSS

The difference of Medallion Transport over the old route holder Cokaliong Shipping Lines, Inc. (CSLI) is that they immediately emphasized rolling cargo. Meanwhile, the latter still stresses loose and palletized cargo to be handled by forklifts, one in the wharf and one inside the car/cargo deck. Cokaliong Shipping Lines dominates the fulfilling of the needs for goods from Cebu of the stores in Surigao and maybe Medallion Transport realized they cannot really compete in that.

What was immediately affected by Medallion Transport were the ships with rolling cargo between Cebu and Leyte that still has to cross the Surigao Strait which means these are the Cebu-Mindanao vehicles and some of that are still headed to Davao, General Santos City, Sultan Kudarat and Cotabato. Although it looks like the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro and Cebu-Nasipit are more direct routes, few load vehicles in those routes as the rates are too high because rates in the sea are far higher than using fuel on land and so vehicles look for short sea crossings.

So, what vehicle owners do is either go to Leyte first from Cebu and then load the vehicle in either the Liloan or Benit port in Southern Leyte or they could go to the ports of southern Cebu and load their  vehicle to Negros island and load again the vehicle in Dumaguete port to Dapitan port. Vehicle owners from Iligan City and Zamboanga del Sur use this route. Now in that area there is already the direct Samboan to Dapitan route which bypasses the port of Dumaguete.

Currently, with a cheap and direct option to Surigao there is no more need to use the route via Leyte to Surigao. It is not only cheaper but it is also less tiring to the driver and the passengers. One can sleep in the overnight ferry-RORO to Surigao and be still fresh upon arriving in Surigao City.

68291356_1109425952590332_6949577506668150784_n

Lady of Triumph by Jose Zeus Ranoco Bade of PSSS

Actually, I recommended this route of Medallion Transport to my son who was bound for Davao City with his car and also to a friend, a PSSS Moderator who is bound for Cagayan de Oro City. I showed the latter that even rolling his vehicle for 300 kilometers (the distance between Surigao City and Cagayan de Oro City), it would still be cheaper than loading it direct to Cagayan de Oro City from Cebu and that he will enjoy the scenery. Davao City was even farther as the distance is some 400 kilometers.

Cokaliong Shipping Lines will always stay in the Cebu to Surigao route doing their old stuff. Surigao is their home turf as the company founder hails from that city, one of the reasons why they dominated that route before. However, since there is also a competition in the passenger business, Cokaliong Shipping Lines was forced to field better and faster ships.

70252012_2674569862555886_8190226359700684800_n.jpg

Filipinas Jagna by Capt. Morrell Maguzara of PSSS

I cannot really stress the names of the ships sailing the route because ship assignments always change. Where it was the Lady of Love before for Medallion Transport now it is their newly-fielded Lady of Triumph which is in the route as the former is being refitted. Where before Cokaliong Shipping Lines used their good Filipinas Cebu to counter the fast Lady of Love, currently they are using the sister ships Filipinas Jagna and Filipinas Surigao del Norte in the route and the two were just recently fielded. The only problem for this competition is the ships arrive at about 4am and that is too early for the driver who still wants some sleep especially if the drive is still long.

64750463_2769366876412307_3916726280908701696_n

Filipinas Surigao del Norte by Mark Edelson Idulsa Ocul of PSSS.

Very recently, a RORO Starlite Ferries Inc. also fielded a RORO in this route. Their ship is the new Stella Maris. However, the difference in the style of the Stella Maris is she would sail twice a day which means a day sailing and a night sailing. I just wonder if there is enough cargo for them for that frequency. Like Medallion Transport, she stresses rolling cargo over loose and palletized cargo.

70127647_1710732375737429_6402836055447306240_n

Stella Maris by Ryan Diel of PSSS.

Maybe there is something in this route to attract three shipping companies and four competing ferry-ROROs. Probably, the route through Leyte to Mindanao with two sea crossings is kaput now as it will always be dearer and with more strain to the driver and also a longer transit time.

This development bears watching as this route not only impacts Surigao but also Nasipit and Cagayan de Oro ports. Lately, I heard the rates to Cagayan de Oro from are already cheaper. That is the beauty of competition – the consumers win.

14936552431_6991a93d03_k

Verano Port of Surigao City by Aris Refugio of PSSS.

If this route holds then Surigao City as point of entry to Mindanao from Cebu will be highlighted more.

 

 

Ports Served By Liners That Lost To The Intermodal Buses

Once, there were ports that were served by the liners of the national shipping companies in the postwar years. Liners from Manila sailed to these ports and the length of their calls or service already exceeded a century. Now, there are no more liners to these ports and instead intermodal buses are the ones now moving their passengers.

15360317515_e9c5512ef2_z

Among the ports I am referring to are San Jose in Occidental Mindoro (called Mangarin in the past), Culasi port in Roxas City (called Capiz in the past); Dumaguit (or New Washington), Batan, Malay (more popularly known as Caticlan now), all in Aklan; Lipata port in Culasi, Antique, San Jose de Buenavista in Antique. The list also includes Masbate; Laoang, Carangian (or San Jose) and Allen in Northern Samar; Calbayog and Catbalogan in Western Samar; Tacloban, Calubian, Palompon, Isabel, Ormoc and Baybay in Leyte; Maasin, Sogod and Cabalian in Southern Leyte. The list would also Tagbilaran in Bohol and Surigao City. Yes, the list is really long. And that is not even 100% complete.

6961153363_f56644e625_z

Tacloban port

How come our good liners with true passenger service and free food lost to the simple bus where there is no service and food is not free? When many of our liners were hotel-like. The simple reason is simply frequency and ubiquity. Buses leave daily while liners don’t. Buses have several trips in a day, both at night and day and in a wide span of schedules and so people have a choice. They also have a choice from several bus lines.

11097966334_e695eb4929_z

I first had a glimpse of their magic of the nearly 15 years ago. I was aboard a bus from Maasin to Manila. The first trip then of the bus was 2am. I noticed that whenever and wherever the bus will see bags in the road without people around, our bus will stop, blow its horn and the passenger/s will appear from the house. Yes, there was no need to wait in the dark suffering from the cold and mosquito bites. The bus will simply stop for you. In Eastern Samar 18 years ago, a relative of the passenger rode the bus in Borongan and stopped the bus in a house in a barrio. Turned out the lady passenger has not yet finished her bath. Well, our bus driver simply turned off the engine to the laughter of all and we all waited and when the lady boarded there were cheers and more laughter. Are those ease and leaning backward possible in a ship? Simply no.

So whenever and wherever a bus begin crossing the straits I noticed they will simply kick out the liners from Manila. This first happened in Samar in the 1980’s. This was followed by Mindoro and Panay in the 2000’s. Masbate, Leyte, Bohol and Surigao soon followed suit. Practically it is only Negros and Cebu islands and northern  and western Mindanao that are immune from the buses from Manila.

10356101894_4907381e9e_z

Intermodal buses in Masbate port

In the examples I gave I made sure it was the buses that torpedoed the liners and not the budget airlines. In those examples I am pretty sure most of the passengers transferred to the intermodal buses because if one checks the frequency of the airlines when there were still liners and today one will notice that the frequency increases of the airlines were modest while the intermodal buses grew by leaps and bounds. That is very clear in Panay. That is very clear in Eastern Visayas and Masbate. That is also true in Surigao, Bohol and Mindoro (maybe in Bohol many make a transfer to a Cebu plane).

I think the liners never knew what hit them. Probably they can not believe that they passengers will move from bunks to seats that taxes the butt and hurts the back. Their liners have toilets and baths and buses don’t have that. They have free food, good service (they have stewards and attendants), functioning restaurants, lounges and areas where passengers can mill around. There are even spas, discos and chapels. Yet the passengers exchanged them for seats where once can barely move. Sounds improbable, isn’t it? But that happened and not only in one place.

30326695765_fb9f243886_z

And to think the bus fares are not even significantly cheaper, if it is. And there are ancillary costs like food, terminal fees, payment for using the comfort rooms of the terminals and eating places. And the perilous and embarrassing case of a sometime traveler’s diarrhea.

I once asked a lady seatmate in a bus (they are more inconvenienced as unlike males they need a true CR) from Surigao why. She said she likes the views when the bus runs, that she likes reaching places she had never been to before. Yes, on a liner you only see the sea, the seascape and some ports.

The bus passengers don’t even need to go to the ports and there be charged unfairly by the porters. And on the return trip they can stop the bus right by their gate (is there a convenience greater than that?). No need for porters again and relatives will be waiting by the gate since there is SMS now. And also in many cases the trip of the bus is shorter than the voyage of the ship. Many also think there is more risk in traveling in a ship. Courtesy of the highly-publicized sinkings like the Dona Paz and the Princess of the Stars.

11555208083_d6213c1f47_z

Even in places like Davao the intermodal bus was also a factor. That was also true in Iloilo and maybe Gensan also.

Those are the things that torpedoed the liners. Maybe the shipping companies never knew what hit them. Their belief is the budget airlines tripped them. That cannot be proven empirically in a lot of places. Maybe their pride is simply too high they cannot admit a lowly bus beat them.

If liners want to make a comeback they should do a real study why the passengers walked away. But I still doubt if they can really beat the intermodal bus. They are simply too ubiquitous.