Our Visits to the Other Ports of Samar on December of 2016

The Philippine Ship Spotters Society (PSSS) tour group, after assembling in Tacloban first stopped in San Juanico bridge to take photos and enjoy the views and the experience especially of walking part of the bridge. Well, just being there is experience for most of those in the tour group. If it could be considered shipspotting it is maybe because of the seascapes and Tacloban port is also visible but at a great distance. I was wishing a ship will navigate the narrow strait separating Leyte and Samar but I know that is almost impossible with the new uncharted depths of the strait, a result that historical storm surge that came with Typhoon “Yolanda”. Actually, deeper container ships coming to Leyte now take the southern approach round Southern Leyte.

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The group then took a long road ride because the next port Catbalogan was some 100 kilometers away from Tacloban and we did not try to visit the many municipal ports along the way which were not along the main road. These old municipal ports were once the lifelines of the coastal towns of Samar to Tacloban when the road was not yet developed some fifty or so years ago. It would have been nice to visit them but it would take time and we were tight on time as our leg to Allen is some 250 kilometers and we have more important ports to visit along the way. And we were not even able to start early and that was the reason why I didn’t mention to the group the former important port of Basey.

We arrived in Catbalogan past lunchtime and we headed straight to the Catbalogan bus terminal which is located astride the port (in fact it was sitting on borrowed port grounds). From there we walked towards the port and it was a lucky day for us. I have not seen such number of vessels in Catbalogan since I first visited the port many, many years ago. We were doubly lucky that the motor bancas to the island-towns off Catbalogan in Samar Sea have still not left. Plus there were the usual cargo ships and an aggregates carrier LCT, the LCT Poseidon 10. I wondered if that number of ships meant progress for Catbalogan. I would really like to know. The only dampener in our visit was the knowledge that recently Roble Shipping has dropped their Cebu-Catbalogan route and it has already sold to Jolo their ship serving that route.

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Catbalogan Port

Since our lunch took time I knew we can’t spend much time on the next ports or even visit some that are near the road like Victoria port. In Calbayog, our next port, we obviated all walking shipspotting and instead opted for shippotting by car the length of the quay road parallel the Calbayog River wharf and fish landing area. There were still many fishing bancas the time we arrived but most of the passenger-cargo motor bancas to the island-towns towns in Samar were already gone as the last of those leave just after lunchtime. We also did not enter Calbayog port and instead just viewed it from afar as we were already pressured for time since we did not want nightfall to come while we were still on the road.

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Calbayog Port

From Calbayog we made a short detour to Manguino-o port just a few kilometers north of Calbayog port. This is now the only port with ferry connection to Cebu and we were unlucky that day because the Cokaliong ship was not there when we dropped by. Basically, aside from that ship only fishing vessels use Manguino-o port. However, from Manguino-o the private port of Samar Coco Products just a few miles south was also visible. Funny, but instead of ships our talk leaving the port was about the Samar bulalo because of my good experience with it in Manguino-o (one should try it on a Samar visit).

It was a long run again in the sun threatening to set over roads that I knew once did not exist. Once upon a time, there was no road directly connecting Allen and Calbayog save for a logging road which was not always passable and only passable to the sturdiest of jeeps (or was it a weapon carrier?). But soon the San Isidro Ferry Terminal came into view and I knew Allen is just a short distance away now and so there is still time to shipspot this government port that is the official connection to Matnog. We did but as the sun sets earlier in December and there was precipitation I knew it will be a photofinish to BALWHARTECO as I expected. This part I have already told in another article:

https://psssonline.wordpress.com/2017/01/29/the-developments-in-the-san-bernardino-strait-routes-when-the-psss-visited-in-december-of-2016/

From a sleep-over in Catarman, on the way back, we made a short visit to the Caraingan port which is located in the town now renamed as San Jose. I told the group this town is more known for the claim of Asi Taulava, the basketball player. Though the main inter-island port of Northern Samar and improved by the government, this port never really took off. It was never able to shake off its reputation for thievery and the new enterprises like coco processing now have their own ports. The damage of the 175kph typhoon that visited Northern Samar just a few years ago was still visible in the port. We did not walk the port to save on time, we just let the car do the walking for us.

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Caraingan Port

We next visited Lavezares port which had a long history. It’s significant lies in that it is the connection to the Biri islands offshore which is now being promoted as a tourist place if one wants to escape civilization. Biri and Lavezares have a reputation in history. For the former, it is the rocks and waves that can threaten ships. For the latter it was a launching port of long-range motor bancas that went beyond Biri in the past like Catanduanes and the Bicol eastern and northern shores. To me Lavezares, like Allen, its mother town is a remnant of the old seafaring tradition of the Pintados which can reach Formosa in the past before the Spaniards forbid local boatbuilding so they can press (as in force) our boatbuiders in building their exploitative galleons. Again, we just made a tour by car of Lavezares port.

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Lavezares Port

[The portion where we made an Allen to Matnog crossing and back is already in the article I attached earlier.]

On our way back to Tacloban there was no more chance of shipspotting as night had already set in contrary to my hope that we can cross early to Matnog and then be back in Allen just past lunch (that would then have afforded us another chance at the ports we just made a cursory visit of). But no regrets. It just meant a realignment of targets (for me).

Reaching Tacloban at midnight, I made Joe Cardenas (the car owner and our driver) sleep while looking for our companion Mark Ocul’s ride back to Cebu (James Verallo eventually convinced him to take a Bohol detour to max his shipspotting experience). Meanwhile at the back of my mind I had a 3:30am cut-off from Tacloban for I will then convince Joe to make a dash to be able to board the 8am ferry in Benit which will afford us enough time to look for and visit the many unexplored ports of Surigao on the way to his friend in Claver, Surigao del Sur without hitting dusk. When we parted, little did our two companions suspect me and Joe were still embarking on a long trip. With 850 kilometers now under his belt who would then suspect Joe is still up for another thousand kilometers of continuous driving?

[However, that portion will be the subject of another article and I will henceforth jump to when we were able to get back to Tacloban to make another run back to Allen.]

From a Tacloban sleep-over after Surigao, me and Joe crossed again the San Juanico bridge but there was no more walking of the bridge this time for we were dead serious in finding the unexplored ports of Samar (or at least those where our daytime will be able to cover). We were elated by our success in Surigao in using maps based on GPS in finding the obscure ports without much turning around (why, it was even more accurate than the locals). Instead of turning left to Sta. Rita, Samar we turned right after the bridge on the way to Basey, the old connection of Samar to Leyte when San Juanico bridge was not yet existing. I was excited what it will show us.

The drive to Basey took longer that I expected. I had a premonition of things we will see because we passed by the cemetery of Basey and it was big and it had Chinese names on it. I have an inkling it was not a small town in the past and there was probably a Chinese quarters which equates to trade.

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Basey Port

We found Basey town alright and it was not the normal small town that I see in Samar. It was obvious it had a great past and the main street was densely packed, proof it had trade before. We found the port road and near it was the remnants of a Chinese quarters. There were concrete structures in the pier but obviously it was already a long-forgotten pier. Only passenger-cargo motor bancas were just using it. These were still active as it affords a shortcut and cheaper ride compared to the jeep (which seemed not to be thriving). I saw students going to Tacloban. It was a proof of links.

From Basey port, the port of Tacloban can be made out along with the San Juanico bridge. I mused – the bridge killed Basey and its progress. Like what I see when new roads bypassed towns. The sea was shallow. I was thinking what if the bridge had been built via Basey? What would have been the result?

We did not stay long in Basey. On the way back, me and Joe kept peering in our GPS map about that abutment which indicates another port which we disregarded on the way to Basey because the road signs contraindicated it. We then came to the junction leading to it and Joe decided we should check even though the road was not so inviting (well, that is one advantage of an SUV over a sedan). Not long after we saw a parish church. It was just before the port. A parish church in a barrio always indicated something more than an ordinary barrio. We learned that we are in San, Antonio, a barrio of Basey. So Basey has two ports not one!

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San Antonio Port

San Antonio port is much closer to Tacloban than Basey port. It seems they are just separated by a wide river and I can almost make out some of the buildings in Tacloban. San Antonio port, though smaller, is busier with more passenger-cargo motor bancas going to Tacloban. It was there that I learned the many motor bancas docked near the market of Tacloban were actually going to San Antonio. The ones docked there were the same motor bancas I saw in Tacloban two hours earlier when me and Joe made short tours of the Tacloban ports. It seems San Antonio is more connected to Tacloban than to its own town of Basey. Again I wondered what if San Juanico bridge was built not on its present site but on a site in San Antonio?

Me and Joe bypassed the Sta. Rita port which was still near Tacloban so as to save time. As always the 250-kilometers stretch of Tacloban to Allen is a challenge to shipspotters to cover before nightfall sets in. I thought maybe one has really to start early like in first daylight if one wants to visit more ports. In the same regard we also bypassed the port of Pinabacdao although there is a clear road sign indicating it. Anyway we wondered if that port and similar ports are already ‘ports to nowhere’ since vans and buses are already their connection to Tacloban.

Joe and me also bypassed the ports of Catbalogan and Calbayog. We reasoned we had been there before and we were more interested in the old port of Victoria and others near there. We just contented our eyes watching the seascape, the occasional ship offshore and with the passenger-cargo motor bancas in the navigable rivers of Samar that connects to the inland municipalities. We also had a dash of adrenaline against a Toyota Grandia (but it was not ship spotting).

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Manguino-0 Port

However, me and Joe made a short detour to Manguino-o port because our first one there was “empty”. The Filipinas Dapitan of Cokaliong Shipping Lines was there. We were able to enter briefly but the guards this time were not accommodating. Maybe the field of Psychology should do a research of how the completion of gates and fences affect the mentality of the guards. It seems with those completed it is now their duty to “protect their fortress”. Manguino-o was hospitable before.

We also bypassed another port with a link to an island-municipality although it is not far from the highway. Alas, me and Joe’s tour was full of ‘bypasses’ that I thought maybe Tacloban, Basey and nearby ports can be covered by tour in one day and maybe one just have to stop for the day in Catbalogan or Calbayog and the next day cover the ports of Northern Samar. There is really no way to cover all the ports in the Tacloban-Allen axis in one day. One will “waste” 100 kilometers from Tacloban to Catbalogan in land travel and next “waste” some 65 kilometers from Manguino-o to San Isidro. And to think the distance of Catbalogan to Calbayog is another 60 “empty” kilometers (as in there are no ports along the way).

The only worthwhile port Joe and me was able to visit after leaving Western Samar was the old port of Victoria which once upon a time had a connection to Manila. We did not use the GPS this time as Joe knows the junction. Like what I expected its poblacion was more packed than a town of its size and the remnants of an old trading quarter was still visible. We reached the port and it is located inside a river mouth where the waters are clear and beautiful spans of Victoria bridge was visible (actually the river might be named Bangon River). There were just a few bancas using the disused concrete port now and most were fishing bancas. There was a wharf for passenger-cargo motor bancas a hundred meters downstream and it was more busy.

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The ports of Victoria

The road to Victoria town and port is just by the bridge of Victoria. It seems Victoria was born around the river that traverses its entire narrow territory and with a wide navigable river it seems that river also serves as an artery. With such a lay-out, Victoria is also a ship shelter during storms. With the sun preparing to set, the slight rains and the silhouttes it produces we left Victoria with me feeling sad. There was no way to be upbeat about what we just saw which was a faded town left by its ship.

I wanted to find the other ship shelter in Victoria town which was Buenos Aires. Joe vetoed it and so we continued north. With the rains sometimes pelting us, explorations become limited. We did not go inside San Isidro Ferry Terminal any more and i just took some shots from the outside. We also bypassed Jubasan port of Sta. Clara Shipping and and just took shots from outside of Dapdap port. Time just flew and when me and Joe entered BALWHARTECO port the light remaining or the lack of it was just about the same when the big group of PSSS first reached it. Me and Joe tarried a little more making a long goodbye with some small talk. I will be staying in BALWHARTECO lodge while he will still be proceeding to Catarman.

I had a pleasant stay in the lodge and it was a great platform for viewing the activities in the port. I spent the next two day exploring BALWHARTECO and the ships there and making interviews. I also looked for my old opponents there, the collectors of the illegal exactions but they were gone. I thought it was not me they feared but the American in our big group who was Tim Alentiev. Well, with his demeanor, attire and shades he might have looked like a CIA operative. Seriously!

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Star Ferry II

In BALWHARTECO I was able to visit the Star Ferry II twice. I was not that much interested in the other ships because I have already boarded them. I became more interested in Star Ferry II when PSSS was able to establish it was now the oldest passenger RORO sailing that is not an LCT (built in 1961!) and there were rumors she might be headed for scrapping (once when she was not running I saw her precisely moored in Victoria port). I wanted simply to know more about her and her current condition.

My second visit came because I was looking for Roger Chape, one of the oldest mariners in Bicol waters who started his career in motor boats (lancha). He happened to be the Chief Engineer of Star Ferry II but I did not know him the first time I boarded the ferry. We had a good talk although the ship was bucking heavily in the night swells and wind (it that was Cebu the praning Coast Guard there would have suspended voyages already). From him I got a better understanding of the state of the ship, a little of its history and how it is managed.

It was really so hard shipspotting in my two days in Allen. The rains were heavy and it simply would not relent. If not for an old umbrella given to me I would have scarcely been able to get around. And there was not even an LPA (Low Pressure Area) but just the usual heavy amihan weather of the area (amihan winds there could even be stronger than LPA winds).

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A ship in San Bernardino Strait amihan

My last chance of shipspotting in Allen was when I left for Matnog. It was long before they sold tickets because dockings can’t be done because of the strong swells and high tide (have one heard of that in Cebu?) I mean it was hours of wait. Then we were able to board but the Coast Guard won’t give clearance to sail because of the weather. It was just a temporary halt and not full suspension. We passengers were worried of a full suspension of voyages and we will become statistics for the evening news on TV (i.e. stranded in the port). While waiting I turned it into an opportunity for shipspotting. But then again the rain messes up the visibility and quality of shots.

I immensely enjoyed my Samar shipspotting despite of the rains which made it difficult to move around. It was a continuation of my summer of 2014 shipspotting with Jun Marquez (summer shipspotting that had plenty of rain too). It was nice and good by any means. I actually love Samar.

My Samar-Leyte Ship Spotting With Jun Marquez (Part 2)

(Sequel to: https://psssonline.wordpress.com/2016/07/31/my-samar-leyte-ship-spotting-with-jun-marquez/

After San Isidro town we ran at some fast clip to make up for time as we were still very far from Baybay and it was already nearing noon. Along the way, I just pointed to Jun the port in Victoria town of Northern Samar which has motor bancas to Dalupiri island but once that port had a ship to Manila. Running, I was also taking pictures of the buses we encountered along the way. The rain has already become a light drizzle and so my shots had become better. I pointed to Jun there was not really much agriculture in Samar and I told him what was Samar’s diet during the late Spanish times (and now Secretary of Agriculture Pinol wants to make Samar the country’s “vegetable bowl”; supplanting Benguet, Isabela, Nueva Ecija and Bukidnon where people really know how to plant vegetables and where the soil is better?).

After an hour-and-a half of rolling we reached the port of Manguino-o in Calbayog, the port with a RORO connection to Cebu which was just recently developed (one of the parallel ports of Gloria Macapagal Arroyo – two ports serving just one locality). Fortunately, this did not turn into a “port to nowhere” (a port with no ships) because Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. served it (but along the way in the other Calbayog port Palacio Lines sunk). We slowly descended into Manguino-o port and the scene was picturesque. We were lucky a Cokaliong ship, the Filipinas Dinagat was there along with a slew of big fishing bancas or basnigs (some with Masbate registries) and local motor bancas that are ferries. The big fishing bancas were busy loading their catch into styropor boxes with ice. The iced fish will be loaded in the Filipinas Dinagat and will be disposed of in Cebu where the demand is greater and price is higher. With the ferry connection there was no more need for the fishing boats to still go to Maya port in the northern tip of Cebu.

There was an easy atmosphere in the port although the walls and the passenger terminal building were not yet finished. I noticed no hustler hanger-ons nor toughies asking for free fish. The port has a different atmosphere than Calbayog port before which is more tense. The old Samar ports have a long reputation for bullies and thievery. I was glad Manguino-o is starting from a clean slate and Cokaliong Shipping Lines is known for tight control. In my voyage before from Manguino-o port I was able to talk to their port captain who exercised tight grip on the crew at wharf and on the porters. That should be the case everywhere. It also seems the fishing vessels now patronize Manguino-o because this is now the port with connection to Cebu. Departure of the ferry to Cebu from here is in the evening when buses and jeeps contracted by Cokaliong Shipping Lines as shuttles will begin arriving from late afternoon.

From Manguino-o port the private wharf of Samar Coco Products, an oil mill, is visible from a distance across the cove. We didn’t have time to visit it nor we were sure of a welcome and so we just took long-distance shots. There were two ships there then, a Granex steel-hulled freighter and a wooden motor boat that were probably delivering copra. In Manguino-o port the view of the rock formations and the offshore rocks (islets) is really beautiful and it is complemented by the islands offshore. However, we didn’t tarry in the port because of the time pressure. The view of the fish being loaded and the views were already enough enjoyment for the eyes.

After a short drive, we next visited the Calbayog River boat landing area which is accessible after crossing the old bridge spanning Calbayog River. I always liked looking at or visiting this wharf which is adjacent to the market of Calbayog. If one is visiting the old Calbayog port this wharf comes before. What I like here is the jumble of bancas from big to small and from fishing bancas to motor bancas ferries to islands of Samar Sea which is under the jurisdiction of Western Samar. On any given morning their number would be in the dozens. We arrived there before lunch and so there were still many motor banca ferries that were leaving and we were able to take photos of them along with the docked fishing bancas. To save on time and to protect against the heat we just used our vehicle to survey the whole scene. I also pointed out to Jun the passenger terminal for the motor banca ferries.

We then entered the old Calbayog port. They were kind enough to let us in although we have no business except ship spotting. It was already redeveloped but it no longer has a RORO to Cebu because Palacio Lines which has Calbayog origins has already quit (ironically). It had actually no more ferries left. What is has now are a few small cargo ships (two when we visited) and the big fishing bancas that cannot be accommodated in the boat landing area by Calbayog River. I noticed no fish being unloaded (it was nearing noon already) and there was also no cargo being unloaded by the freighters. Except for the presence of the big fishing bancas, Calbayog port was a little desolate.

I also pointed to Jun the locally-built breakwater built by piling stones, the native way. It was good to look at although it is just low. It extends from the boat landing area to the Calbayog port. Me and Jun were comparing it to the gilded breakwater of Enrile and Gigi in Cagayan that cost P4.5 billion and that amount is already enough to build 10 good-sized ports. Yes, if only there is less thievery in government we would have better infrastructure.

We did not stay too long in Calbayog port because of the we were short of time and soon we were on the way to Catbalogan. We passed by Sta. Margarita town, the town with an L-shaped curve along the highway. I don’t know but I find Sta. Margarita beautiful including its coconut groves and its mix of rice field. The road there is good now. Soon we were watching the sea (Samar Sea) and its blend of wonderful seascape which is observable from high from the highway. Soon we were descending to Catbalogan. Jun suggested we bypass Catbalogan port to make up for time. I acceded; it is already a “this one or that one” situation. We had to decide between Catbalogan and Tacloban became it was nearing mid-afternoon and we are not even halfway to Baybay. We thought Tacloban has more importance and we will still have the chance to view the damage of Typhoon “Yolanda”. Catbalogan will be the only major port we will miss on our drive and probably it doesn’t have a good share of ships anyway since it is less active than Calbayog port (but once upon a time this was the most active port in the entire Samar island). It does have a Roble ship though once or twice a week.

We ate at Jollibee again because we already needed food and I needed to recharge the batteries of my camera so I will still have some charge available in Tacloban. It was near 2pm when we left Catbalogan. I had some chance to point out to Jun the important landmarks inside the capital city including the city hall and provincial capitol and soon we were climbing the narrow road out of Catbalogan. The view from the hills of the bay was again magnificent. This time the Samar estuaries and fishponds were more visible and we passed by Jiabong and Buray junction again. In Hinabangan we passed through the diversion road and told Jun of my near-mishap when driving at night at 11pm my engine quit right there (the road was still muddy then). Since it was mostly straights in that part of the Samar highway, we were going at a fast clip. Soon the eatery before San Juanico bridge came into view followed by the junction to Basey, the clear landmark we are already very near San Juanico bridge.

It was already near 4pm when we reached the famous San Juanico bridge. We saw the wrecked DPWH dredger and the damage to the government maritime school (National Maritime Polytechnic) by the bridge. Soon we were in Barangay Anibong, the place of the wrecked ships. It had a playground atmosphere especially it was a Sunday afternoon. There were other visitors including foreigners helping the victims of the typhoon. Me and Jun were talking if the ships can still be saved. I told him it depends. I said all that might be needed are bulldozers to dig a canal so the ships can be towed to open water. But that will mean also bulldozing houses and it might be unacceptable. We moved further on to a point where Tacloban port was visible across the bay but all that can be taken were long-distance shots in the glistening sun.

Soon we were hightailing it to Baybay. The sister of Jun has already followed him up. “What time will you arrive?” was the question. On the way I still took as much pictures as I can while discussing the disaster. Jun pointed out the first-class emergency tents donated by Australia. We saw similar donations from other countries all part of the “1/7th rule” where advanced countries are obliged to send 1/7th of their emergency stockpile when a disaster occurs somewhere in the globe to immediately alleviate suffering and save lives. That was the reason why ships from the USA, Japan, France, etc. immediately arrived in Tacloban and Guiuan, Samar along with cargo planes full of relief goods. The locals and its countrymen cannot understand such kind of response which was the resolution gathered from the Aceh tsunami disaster.

Jun and me was further discussing how long will the crops be productive again. I said for those heavily damaged coconuts it will be two years. I was also discussing the failure of “Project NOAH” of the government along with PAGASA and NDRRMC which looked amateurish (the latter should have gotten typhoon veterans from Bicol). The problem with the government agencies is they were too bilib in PAGASA and so they discounted the shrill warnings of NOAA and Weather Underground of the US which predicted 6 meters waves whereas PAGASA and Project NOAH predicted 6 feet of storm surge (and no need to say who was right). It was the record storm surge that made most of the damage. It was not the 200kph sustained winds at the center of the typhoon.

Dusk was already gathering when we turned past Abuyog. It will be lucky if we will arrive by the 7pm dinner as we still have a mountain to cross. Soon we were in the hills of Mahaplag. It was already dark and there was no chance to savor the mountain views. Then on the descents to Baybay there was a gridlock. A truck laden with a container van hit the electrical wires crossing the street and pulled it down to the road. At first none of the vehicles dared to cross. But with the help of the locals we were able to get through the maze. We were lucky our vehicle was small and crossed to the other side of the highway as the truck was stuck in the middle of the road. But we lost a good 30 minutes. It was already 8pm when we reached the house of Jun’s parents which was located north of Baybay.

Jun’s father was a retired professor of VISCA, the former Visayas State College of Agriculture, a nationally-ranked college of agriculture (it was ranked 4th then, said my brother). Now it is called the Visayas State University (VSU). A ship spotter who is good in ships teaches there and we were scheduled to visit him. Jun’s father speaks good English. As Jun described before, his mother is a Chinese-Filipino. The youngest sister of Jun (who was there and entertained us) and her husband is leaving the next day for a company-sponsored foreign tour. The discussions became more important than the dinner and it covered a wide range of topics.

I was free the next morning since Jun has to send off his sister and brother-in-law. I spent it roaming the city center of Baybay including the market (this portion of the city is not visible from the bus), the bus terminal and the port which were all just adjacent to one another. Like in Ormoc, the bus terminal is right outside the gate of Baybay port but the difference is the wharf of Baybay port is some distance from the gate. The docked ships were Lapu-lapu Ferry 8 and the Sacred Stars.There was not much port activity. That was not the first time I made tambay in that bus terminal. It fascinates me. I am able to gather info and see the public utility vehicle movement and of course also take shots. I like their locally-built jeeps too. Those go to Abuyog and some are the double-tire type. Of course, I also try to taste the local flavors even at the risk of having stomach trouble (but that rarely happens to me).

Before mid-afternoon, me and Jun were ready to visit the Visayas State University instructor and Baybay ship spotter, Mervin Soon who is not that well health-wise. I nearly did not recognize him (I visited him before). But he was still in high fighting spirit. Mervin knows a lot about ships on the eastern seaboard including Bicol since he worked there before. He knows the ships including the defunct ones from the 1990’s and that included Cebu ships since he studied in Cebu (like Jun). I still wanted to interview him about ships but we did not stay too long as our presence is a danger to Mervin and our schedule was already getting tighter as will be revealed later.

I thought Jun will spend the night in Baybay and I will already take the Lapu-lapu Ferry ship that night to Cebu which was not too exciting as I already rode their Sacred Stars before. If that was the case then I would still have plenty of time since the scheduled departure time was still 8pm. If it was the case I was going alone I was even thinking of going to Hilongos to take the ferry there so that might ride will be different and anyway I have not passed through Hilongos before. But Jun had change of plans and he intended to sail that late afternoon via Oceanjet in Ormoc, the last trip for the afternoon. That day was actually the birthday of my son in Cebu and so makakahabol pa somehow if I go with Jun. And so when I called him he was surprised because he was expecting me three days later (on the assumption I will go via Masbate from Allen).

We just had enough time to catch Oceanjet 5 in Ormoc. The line was long, we were nearly full in the vessel. The aircon of Oceanjet 5 was cold and we were at the stern, our choice. But even there near the engine it was comfortable as the NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness) was low. The trip was uneventful and there was nothing much to see because we departed Ormoc when it was beginning to get dark. We arrived in Cebu at 8pm on a night with moderate rain. Jun and me shared the same taxi and we soon parted ways.

I covered more than 1,200 kilometers in 3 days plus a ship ride on the 4th day. It was tiring but I had plenty of photos and memories. It would also turn out to be my last long-distance land trip.