The Disproportionality of the Ferry Losses in the Philippines

Many times the question of if our ferries are safe is asked. This is especially true when a ferry has an accident or is lost especially when the casualty count is high. Rather than answering the question straight, if I am asked, I might answer it “it depends” because that is probably the most exact answer to the question anyway but then many will be puzzled by that answer (pilosopo ba?). Read on and you will be enlightened further and maybe your views about the safety our ferries might change.

23032624_10212883313670742_3140044798308994657_n

Even if a car is new it doesn’t mean it won’t take a dip into the water. Same principle applies with ships. Photo by Zed Garett (happened just today — what a timely photo for my article). Thanks a lot to the photo owner.

But first a clarification. I am purposely limiting this topic to ferries because tackling all the ship types at once will be very heavy and tedious as we have more freighters than ferries and add to that the other types like the tugs, tankers, etc. The ferry losses is the segment that actually raises the hackles of the people of the country who are mainly uneducated on the topic of maritime losses. This relative ignorance is further fanned by our also-uneducated media whose writers and editors cannot even seem to get the ferries’ names right (it seems they are too lazy to verify with MARINA, the maritime authority). Of course, it is well-known that our media is on the sensationalistic side and so oftentimes accuracy, objectivity and balance are lost with that (do these sell anyway?).

Another limitation I also pose here is I won’t include our wooden-hulled passenger crafts in the discussion. Those crafts are really flimsy especially those equipped with outriggers, the motor bancas. This ship type (those are ships because any sea craft having a passenger capacity of 12 is not a boat) lacks the basic safety equipment that even without a storm they can sink like when an outrigger breaks or when the hull develops a leak big enough that water can’t be bailed fast enough. But I would rather not comment on their seamanship or lack of formal maritime education because in my decades of traveling at sea I found that many of them are actually very good in reading the wind and the waves, a nautical skill that is not taught in maritime schools anymore. Also excluded in the discussion are the wooden-hulled lanchas and batels which were formerly called as motor boats which are not called as motor launches.

My topic here is about the disproportionality (or lack of proportionality) of our maritime losses to clarify that our ferry losses are not proportional with regards to the area and to the ship type (the implication is not all sink). Like what I just mentioned earlier, our wooden-hulled crafts especially the motor bancas are prone to losses especially in areas notorious for its dangerous waves like in Surigao. But these sea crafts continue to exist because in many cases these are the most practical crafts for certain routes like the routes to our small islands and islets or the coastal barrios that have no roads (or if taking the roundabout road will take too long). Motor bancas can land even on bare shores which the other crafts can’t do and moreover these can operate profitably on the barest minimum of passengers and cargo something which is impossible in steel-hulled vessels which have engines that are much, much bigger and are heavier.

The liners, our multi-day ships, among our class of ferries are also very vulnerable to losses (a surprise?) and much more than others classes pro rata to their small number. Relative to their small number, we have lost a lot of liners in the past for a variety of reasons – capsizing, foundering, beaching, wrecking, collision, fire, bombing and explosion. And this might come as a surprise to many because in the main it is our liners that are the biggest, these hold the highest of the certificates (and in insurance many have the comprehensive P & I or “Protection and Indemnity”), these have our most experienced and best crewmen supposedly (unlike in smaller ferries where a Second Mate can serve as Captain of the ship) and much pride of its shipping company is riding on them (well, not all, as we had liners that were no more than the average overnight ferry).

But this vulnerability is actually completely true. We lost the SuperFerry 3 (fire in a shipyard in 2000), SuperFerry 6 (fire while sailing in 2000 too), the SuperFerry 7 (fire in port in 1997), SuperFerry 9 (capsizing in 2009), the SuperFerry 14 (firebombing in 2000 but the official report says otherwise). A total of five SuperFerries when only a total of 20 ships ever carried the name “SuperFerry” (it seems it is not a good name?). The St. Thomas Aquinas, the former SuperFerry 2 was lost in a collision in 2013 and the St. Gregory The Great, the former SuperFerry 20 was also lost (taking a shortcut and hitting the reefs and she was no longer repaired and just sold after equipment was taken out). These two ferries were already under 2GO when they were lost. Not included here were the groundings of the Dona Virginia and the Our Lady of Banneux (technically under Cebu Ferries Corporation then but an actual liner) from which they were never repaired and ending their sailing careers).

Sulpicio Lines is much-lambasted and derided by most of our people but actually they have less losses from their “Princess” and “Don/Dona” series of ships in the comparative period as the existence of the “SuperFerries” of WG&A (William, Gothong & Aboitiz and its successor company Aboitiz Transport System (ATS). However, it is true that in passenger casualties the total of Sulpicio Lines is much, much higher because they have the tendency to sail straight into storms like the revered Compania Maritima before them (in terms of ship losses and not in casualties) and that historical company took a lot of losses from those risk-takings too (and more than even Sulpicio Lines).

From 1996 when the WG&A was formed, Sulpicio Lines only lost the Philippine Princess (fire while under refitting in 1997), the Princess of the Orient (capsizing in a storm in 1998), the Iloilo Princess (fire and capsizing while under refitting in 2003), the Princess of the World (fire while sailing in 2005) and the Princess of the Stars (capsizing in a storm in 2008) and the Princess of the Pacific (serious grounding incident resulting in complete total loss in 2004). That is until they were suspended in 2008 when only one liner was left sailing for them, the Princess of the South which did not sink.

In the comparative period, WG&A and ATS employed a total of 24 liners (the overnight ferries of Cebu Ferries Corporation was obviously not included here are they are not multiday liners). Sulpicio Lines had a total of 22 liners in the parallel period so their numbers are about even. But the ship loss total of WG&A, ATS and 2GO is clearly higher and the public was never made aware of this. Maybe some good PR works while it seems Sulpicio Lines never took care of that and all they knew was feeding their passengers well (unli rice or smorgasbord, anyone?). But then however those liner losses are scandalous in number, by whatever measure. Imagine losing more than one liner per year on the average.

Some of the liners of WG&A and ATS were not SuperFerries in name but but the Our Ladies, the two Cities and a Dona from William Lines had perfect safety records as none of them was ever lost. Now, does the choice of name matter in safety? Or the “lesser” ferries do try harder and are more careful? That discrepancy certainly made me think and it might be worth a study.

Negros Navigation was far safer than the WG&A and Sulpicio Lines losing only the St. Francis Xavier in 1999. Do naming of liners after saints enhance their safety? Conversely, do naming of liners with the qualifier “Super” means the ship will sink faster? Questions, questions. But the lightly-regarded and revived Carlos A. Gothong Lines Incorporated (CAGLI) tops them all with absolutely no losses. Now for a company that sometimes have difficulty painting their ships that is something (while the spic-and-span WG&A and ATS which repaints their liners while sailing tops the losses department). Does it mean it is better not to repaint liners well? I observed in the eastern seaboard that the ships that are not painted well have no losses (until the dumb Archipelago Ferries let its stalled Maharlika II sank into the waves in 2014 without rescuing it and thereby breaking the record – that ship was newly painted when it went under so the repainting might have doomed her?). Well, in my earlier thesis and later in this article I find it funny that the ships which are more rusty does not sink as long as it is not a Batangas ship (ah, the disproportionality again). While those that can always afford new paint like WG&A and successor ATS sink. Is a new coat of paint a sign of danger for the ship? Or is it the P & I insurance that did them in? Funny, funny. Negros Navigation when it was already in trouble and lacks the money already did not have one ship sinking. So the illiquidity which Negros Navigation suffered means more safety? Har, har! Whatever, I want to commend them and top honcho Sulficio Tagud for taking the high road and not just let the ships sink just to collect insurance. And last note, in multi-day liner operations before, Aleson Shipping Lines never lost a ship.

Liners sink at a faster rate pro rata compared to overnight ferries (if the wooden-hulled ferries of the past are not counted) and that is a big puzzle to me. And of course nobody will know for sure because nobody studied that as we don’t have the equivalent of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) of the USA which call in true experts and go in depth why the transportation accidents happened. Is it because while on a voyage the liners are practically running 24 hours a days and systems, equipment and personnel are stressed more? Is it because the ships reach their reliability/cycles earlier in terms of hours of usage like the electrical lines which is a cause of fire? Or are their crew simply more tired and believes that their ships with high certifications are less vulnerable to sinking (as if those certificates will keep the ship afloat)?

In the earlier decades and even recently it is known that liners take more chances with storms and maybe because they think they can battle the waves better because they are bigger. There are shipping companies who were known to be more brave (or foolhardy?) in sailing ships when there are storms about and among them the old Compania Maritima and Sulpicio Lines almost surely top the list. Now, however, the field is more level as all Philippine ships are barred from sailing when the center wind of the storm reaches 60kph. And for the smaller ships less than 250gt they are not permitted to sail when the center wind is already 45kph or when the local weather agency PAGASA declares a “gale warning” even though there is no a gale. When the suspensions are in effect better just watch the foreign ships still continue sailing for they are not covered by the suspension and most actually use INMARSAT or equivalent which is just a curiosity in the local maritime world until now when that is already well-established outside of the Philippines (the lousy PAGASA which can’t do localized forecasts seems to be already good for them since it is free while they have to pay for INMARSAT).

Liners also sink faster than short-distance ferries whose sailing durations are all short and whose crews probably know their particular seas and routes more. When to think most short-distance ferries which are always small are captained in the main by Second or Third Mates and whose engine department are headed by Second or sometimes by just Marine Diesel Mechanics who have not even finished college but passed an exam just the same (well, competence in running and maintaining a machine well is not necessarily dictated by diplomas, trust me). Even though liners might be using ECDIS don’t be too sure they will reach their destination better than the lowly short-distance ferry using just what is called as dead reckoning. In truth, ECDIS or whatever better bridge equipment does not guarantee better seamanship or navigation. After all it will not show the wind and wave which only something like INMARSAT can.

So in liners disproportionality already exist. And their international certifications don’t even save them from disasters. So, I advise those who take liners, don’t be very sure and make the necessary precautions like memorizing the different alarms and making sure where your life vests are. And don’t jump to the water too early. Liners are tall and that plunge could hurt you. And when in the water at night tie yourselves together so as not to drift (a whistle is a big help in calling attention if you are drifting). Note the water can be cold at night and hypothermia can set in. Take a selfie too before jumping and upload it. Who knows if it will be your last photo. Your loved ones will sure prize it. Ah, don’t take all I said in this paragraph too seriously.

In overnight ferries there seems to be disproportionality with regards to companies and not to home port (if analyzed pro rata to the size of the fleet which means the size of the fleets are taken into consideration) and to the routes. Well, for practical purposes there are only a few home ports for overnight ferries – Cebu, Zamboanga, Batangas, Manila, Lucena and Iloilo, in that order maybe in terms of sailings (a clarification, there are overnight ships originating from say northern Mindanao but all of those ferries are actually based in Cebu). Analyzing, some overnight ferry companies deserve the Gold Award while some should be suspended from service, maybe.

It must be noted that one of the biggest overnight ferries two decades ago and which dominated the Visayas-Mindanao waters for nearly a decade, the Cebu Ferries Corporation (CFC), a subsidiary of WG&A and successor Aboitiz Transport System (ATS) did not lose a single ship ever until it they left Cebu for Batangas and became the “Batangas Ferries” and even there their perfect streak continued. Maybe some of their people need to be recruited by other companies or sent there by MARINA to share the experience. They can lecture on the topic, “On How Not To Sink”. Maybe it is not just with the choice of name that they were safe? Or was it in the livery? The only problem it seems is they did not send their Captains to their liners like the St. Thomas Aquinas who made a dumb mistake trying to test the hardness of the ice-classed bow of the Sulpicio Express Siete.

In the Cebu-based regional shipping companies which are operators of overnight ferries it is probably Lite Ferries who is the Valedictorian having lost no ships even though their fleet is already big. Maybe that will come as a surprise to many but whatever they deserve a big round of applause. Another company whose Captains might need to be recruited by other shipping companies or pry open their secret if there is any. Are they better readers of SOLAS? One thing I am sure though is its owner does not belong to the same fraternity as one former Batangas shipping company owner who threatens mayhem if his ship sinks.

There are other overnight ferry companies in Cebu that could have shared First Honors with Lite Ferries but in a tie-breaker Lite Ferries wins because they have the most ships and not by a small margin at that. Others with perfect records are the defunct Palacio Lines (well, some might argue that that is a Samar shipping company but I digress). Now I can’t understand why an overnight ferry company with a perfect safety record will go under as a company. Seems something is not right. Aside from Palacio Lines there are a lot of there Cebu-based overnight ferry companies that have perfect safety records in terms of having no ship losses. Some of these are still extant and sailing and some have already quit the business (it’s a waste, isn’t it, for them to just go away like that).

Among these is the legendary Gabisan Shipping Lines, VG Shipping, Kinswell Shipping, Roly Shipping, Jadestar Shipping, South Pacific Transport and many other smaller shipping lines with just one or two ships (most of these are already gone now but still their perfect records remain). I just don’t know why they can’t catch a break from MARINA as in they are not given special citations and handed more privileges in sailing because after all they have proven they know their stuff in shipping. But no, when MARINA goes headhunting in safety they are lambasted in the same vein as those which had sunk ships as if they are just as guilty. Actually, to set the record straight about half of the overnight ferry companies in the whole Philippines never had any ship losses. This is true even in Zamboanga where Magnolia Shipping Lines, Ever Lines and a lot of other operators with just one or two steel-hulled ferries have perfect safety records. Now, can’t MARINA even for once credit them properly and publish their names because the way I feel at times with media reports and with MARINA statements it is as if all our shipping companies already had sunk ships which is simply not the case. In the liner sector that is true but in the overnight ferry and short-distance sector, combined, most shipping companies never had any ship losses. Don’t they deserve credit and more respect and recognition? But no, they are sunk not beneath the waves but in obscurity and that is one of the purpose of this article, to set the record straight.

In Manila, the old MBRS Lines and its successor Romblon Shipping Line never lost a ship (but the company is dead now anyway, sunk by the intermodal). In Lucena, Kalayaan Shipping Lines might have a perfect safety record too at least in steel-hulled ferries. In Batangas, there are operators of just one or two ferries which have not lost a ship (do they take care not to lose one because that will mean the shutdown of operations?). In Iloilo, did Milagrosa Shipping Lines already lost a ship? In number half of the overnight ferry operators never lost a ship although in the number of ships owned theirs comprise just the minority, to clarify.

It is in short-distance ferries that I noticed a lot more of disproportionalities especially in the recent decades when maritime databases were able to keep track with them (the wooden-hulled short-distance ferries generally doesn’t have IMO Numbers so keeping track of them is difficult but these lanchas or batels were our early short-distance ferries aside from the motor bancas). For this sector or segment I would rather stick to steel-hulled ferries like what I mentioned early on especially since there is no way to track the hundreds and hundreds of motor bancas and their losses which are not even properly reported at times.

There are areas, routes and short-distance companies that have perfect safety records (again, wooden hulled ferries are not included here and that also mean the earlier years). In the eastern seaboard where the typhoons first strike and where it is fiercest the routes and shipping companies there have a perfect safety record ever since the steel-hulled ships first appeared in 1979. This was only broken in 2013 due to the dumbness of a stranger which invaded the Masbate waters (is that part of the eastern seaboard anyway? but Masbate is in Bicol). They withdrew from Bicol after that incident to just sail the more benign Camotes Sea waters. And that is one of the reasons why I was furious at Archipelago Ferries for not coming to the aid of their stalled ship for 6 hours when their good ship was just just two hours sailing away and so the stricken ship slid off the waves (shouldn’t someone be hanged for that?). Because of that the perfect record of the local shipping companies based in the eastern seaboard was broken. I just hope the crewmen of Maharlika Cuatro which failed to respond to an SOS then are not employed in the FastCats now.

Short-distance ferries also does not sink in the Tablas Sea crossings or in the routes to Marinduque from Lucena. However, I do not know what is the curse of the Verde Island Passage that many ships have been already lost there when to think practically the same shipping companies ply the three routes mentioned. To think the Tablas Sea wind and waves could be rougher than that in Verde Island Passage. Did they assign their lousier crews there? Just asking. As they say the proof is in the pudding (and the pudding tastes bad).

I just wonder too about the luck of the Mindanao Sea crossings. The waves there could also be rough and the crossing is longer but none was ever lost among the short-distance ferries running the Dumaguete-Dapitan, Samboan-Dapitan and Jagna-Balingoan routes. Like in Tablas Strait, do the longer route makes the crews more careful? Are the crews there better trained and has better seamanship?

The many routes connecting Cebu island and Negros island and Negros island and Panay island are also safe. Hard to find there a short-distance steel-hulled ferry that sank. That is also true for the steel-hulled ferries connecting Masbate island to Cebu island when the distance there is also long for a short-distance ferry and the wind and waves are no less dangerous. What is their secret there? Is it just that Camotes Sea navigators are lousier? With exceptions, of course because Gabisan Shipping surely will not agree.

I could go to the less obscure, short-distance routes. Just the same I will tell you these are also safe. Never heard of a steel ferry going to Alabat that sank. Or to Dinagat and Siargao islands (sure their motor bancas sink). Or the routes to Basilan from Zamboanga. Not even a RORO to Guimaras have sunk or a RORO to Bantayan island. That is also true for the short-distance connections within Romblon island served by steel-hulled ships (the Princess Camille that capsized in Romblon port in 2003 was an overnight ferry from Batangas). No steel-hulled ferry connecting Leyte and Bohol was ever lost too. And that is also true for the route connecting Siquijor to Dumaguete.

So a lot of our short-distance routes and the ferries plying them are actually safe. Who can argue against a perfect safety record? A little rust will not sink ships nor would a non-functioning firefighting pump (and the ship is not in the middle of an ocean anyway). Those are just a little margins that are not that critical. Does not look good to the eye but to a passenger like me it is more important if MARINA enforces their Memorandum Circular that ferries should feed its passengers if the arrival of the ship exceeds 7am. And I am more concerned if the ship is clean especially the rest rooms and if there is clean drinking water. Besides, trust me, our mariners are not that negligent or dumb that they will leave the ramps unclosed and then sail like what some Europeans did.

So are our ferries safe? Yes, it is except for the liners, some shipping companies and some routes and areas. Never mind if they are old. It is not necessarily the factor that will sink ships (a ship if it loses motive power still has the flotation of a barge). It is actually the lack of seamanship that sinks ships (old ship, new ship can both collide or fail to heed the weather). And trust the short-distance ferries on the fringes and don’t underestimate them. The crew won’t let their ships sink if their families, relatives, friends, schoolmates, etc. are aboard. Well, not all. Be a little wary in Verde Island Passage and in Camotes Sea.

Let us be more objective. Our ferries and mariners are not really that bad, contrary to what hecklers say.

Advertisements

The Other Passenger Ships Built in 1967 That Came to the Philippines

There were other ships built in 1967 that also came to the Philippines. Their number is about the same as those still existing until now. If they are gone now it is not because they sank or was lost (except for a few). Most of the reasons why they are gone circles around the situation that they were no longer wanted and there were no other takers. Sometimes that is just the simple reason why ships including ferries are retired, disposed off and broken up.

All of these ferries were built abroad and there were no local-builds (it looks like shipping companies hold on longer to the ships that they built). Some of these were gone even before the turn of the millennium but then they still they lasted more than 30 years of service. So, here then are the passenger ships built in 1967 that came to our country but are no longer around.

Maybe we should start with the grandest of them all, the cruise ship Dona Montserrat of Negros Navigation Company which came in late 1974 but unfortunately she did not last long. She was a fine ship, no doubt, but it seems she was way ahead of her time as most Filipinos don’t have enough money yet for cruises and if they have they would rather go on trips abroad ait is more sosyal. But then Dona Montserrat had voyages even to Hongkong too. Negros Navigation Company bought this cruise ship for $3.4M, a big sum in those days.

DONA MONTSERRAT

Dona Montserrat by Dimas Almada

The Dona Montserrat was originally the Cabo Izarra and built by SECN (Navantia Carenas) in Matagorda, Spain for Ybarra Line. She was a cruiser ship with three passenger decks and with all the amenities of a cruise ship of her size during her period. These included 110 staterooms for 273 passengers, dining salon with international and Filipino cuisine, main lounge, penthouse, library, game room, swimming pool and bars. The ship was fully air-conditioned, fully carpeted and she had a well-equipped galley. Music (as in a band) and entertainment nightly was available in Dona Montserrat. The primary route of this cruise ship was Manila-Corregidor-Iloilo-Zamboanga-Davao aside from cruises to special destinations like Sicogon island and Hongkong.

This cruise ship measured 104.9 meters Length by 15.8 meters Breadth by 10.3 meters Depth, a Depth which means she is a stable ship. Her Gross Register Tonnage was 4,339 tons and her Net Register Tonnage was 1,675 tons. She was powered by two B&W engines developing 7,800 horsepower giving her a top sustained speed of 19.5 knots. So during her time she was the passenger ship with the highest power sailing in the country and in terms of size she was about equal to the bigger fast cruiser liners that arrived in the country in the latter half of the 1970’s.

In less than 5 years, however, Dona Montserrat quit sailing and she was sold to China where she was used a cruise ship.

The next ship in this list was also a cruise ship but she came later, in 1999, but was more successful and was also built in Spain. She was the Coco Explorer No.1 of Coco Explorer Inc. She was more successful maybe because she was able to attract foreign tourists who wanted to explore our hidden coves and islands, do diving tours and being smaller and of shallower draft she was more fit in this role.

COCO EXPLORER - COCO CRUISES

Coco Explorer No.1 by Dimas Almada

The Coco Explorer No.1 was the former Sta. Maria de la Caridad and she was built by Union Levante in Valencia, Spain. This cruise ship measures only 66.9 meters by 11.0 meters by 5.1 meters and her Gross Tonnage is only 1,199 and her Net Tonnage is only 562. In size she is just like many of the Cebu to Leyte overnight ferries but she is not as tall. This ship was powered by MWM engines of 2,000 horsepower total and her design speed was 15 knots. The Coco Explorer No.1 was a cruiser ship.

In 2005, the Coco Explorer No.1 was sold to China for breaking up. Maybe age caught up with her and there was already competition by smaller tour-dive ships in the waters she used to go which was mainly in the direction of Palawan. Moreover, the places which were her haunts were already accessible by other means and there were already facilities like resorts and hotels.

The next ship on this list was a beautiful ship and once was a flagship of Negros Navigation Company which was the Don Julio. This ferry was built brand-new for Nenaco by Maizuru Heavy Industries in Maizuru Japan. She measured 95.7 meters by 13.9 meters by 7.5 meters with a Gross Tonnage of 2,381 and a Net Tonnage of 1,111. Her later passenger capacity was 994 with accommodations from Suite to Economy classes. The Don Julio was a cruiser ship where cargo was handled by a boom in the bow which meant slow cargo handling. Cruiser ships also have less cargo capacity compared to RORO ferries. And maybe these were the reasons why she fell into disfavor later in the company.

4060602632_571e84bf15_z

Don Julio by John Ward

The ship has a single Hitachi engine of 4,400 horsepower and her sustained top speed was 17.5 knots qualifying her as a fast cruiser liner of her era. Her main routes were to Iloilo and Bacolod but when she got old and bigger ships came along she was shunted to minor routes like Roxas City. Later, when she can no longer be accommodated in the fleet of Negros Navigation she was transferred to Jensen Shipping and among the routes of the company was Cebu to Iloilo. Later, this ship disappeared without trace and not because she sank. It was simply that databases lost track of her. It was sad because the person after she was named, Congressman Julio Ledesma IV was interested in buying her for posterity.

The Don Julio was a sister ship of the Dona Florentina and the Don Juan, both of Negros Navigation Company and the Cebu City of William Lines, all of which became flagships of their fleets one time or another. Now, that is a distinguised company.

The next ship on this list should be the Iligan City of William Lines which later became the Sampaguita Ferry 3 of Sampaguita Shipping Corporation of Zamboanga City. Originally, this ship was Amami Maru of Amami Kaiun of Japan. She was built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Shimoneseki, Japan and her external measurements were 83.1 meters by 12.0 meters by 4.5 meters. Her Gross Tonnage was 1,512 and her Net Tonnage was 562 and her passenger capacity was 635 persons. She was equipped with a single Mitsubishi engine of 3,800 horsepower which gave her a sustained top speed of 17 knots.

This ship was a cruiser ship and thus she had the same disadvantages of the Don Julio when the RORO ferries came. She was mainly fielded by William Lines in the Cebu-Iligan route and she stayed there until the merger which created WG&A in 1996. She was then transferred to the WG&A subsidiary Cebu Ferries Corporation where she was tried in the Cebu-Roxas City route and other routes. She was not successful and she was one of the ships offered for sale by Cebu Ferries Corporation immediately. By then she was no longer a satisfactory ship as her passenger accommodations were already tiny compared to the current standards of the times then.

In 1997, Iligan City was purchased by Sampaguita Shipping Corporation of Zamboanga City where unmodified she became the Sampaguita Ferry 3. During that time Sampaguita Shipping was building up its fleet to have modern and comfortable overnight ferries for its long routes using bank loans. They also used the abbreviation “SF”, a takeoff from the SF SuperFerry as in they are the SuperFerry of Zamboanga. Well, they even built a modern terminal a la SuperFerry near the entrance of Zamboanga port.

However, Sampaguita Shipping was hit by bad timing because soon the highways out of Zamboanga City became paved and they eventually lost to the buses. Competition also became very tight in Zamboanga which was a product of the deregulation policies and incentives laid out by the Ramos Administration. Modern and new High Speed Crafts (HSCs) even came to Zamboanga City like Weesam Express and the fastcrafts of A. Sakaluran. Under the crushing load of its debts, Sampaguita Shipping defaulted, collapsed and ceased operations. The last heard of Sampaguita Ferry 3 was she was sold to the breakers.

We will then come to three overnight ferries that first came to Carlos A. Gothong Lines Incorporated (CAGLI) locally. The first was the Dona Lili which was very well-known in the Cebu-Nasipit route battling the big Nasipit Princess of Sulpicio Lines. This ship was built in Japan as the Seiran Maru by Taguma Shipbuilding & Engineering Corporation in their Innoshima yard. And in 1980 this ferry came to CAGLI as one of the earliest RORO ships of the company and in the archipelago.

The Dona Lili had the external measurements 69.0 meters by 12.0 meters by 4.5 meters. Her Gross Register Tonnage in Japan was 856 tons and in conversion here to Gross Tonnage the figure was left unchanged. The ship’s Net Tonnage was 448 and her passenger capacity was 732 persons. The Dona Lili was powered by two Daihatsu marine engines with a total of 2,600 horsepower and her sustained top speed when still new was 15.5 knots. In size, she is just like the Cebu to Leyte overnight ferries of today.

6556396827_19cc84b8c7_z

Credits to PDI and Gorio Belen

When the merger that resulted in WG&A came she was transferred to its subsidiary Cebu Ferries Corporation and in this company she was assigned the Cebu-Tacloban route with also a route to Camiguin. But when Cebu Ferries Corporation dropped its Tacloban route because it was losing to the shorter Ormoc route, it seems Dona Lili did not sail again. By that time Cebu Ferries had an excess of ships because they already dropped a third or more of its former routes and so the older and smaller ferries especially the cruisers had nowhere to go especially since WG&A can drop former liners to Cebu Ferries. With that situation, Dona Lili dropped from sight never to be seen again and not because she sank.

The next ferry that came to Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. was their second Don Benjamin (they had an earlier Don Benjamin which was a former “FS” ship) which arrived in 1982. This is a ship that served their Iligan and Ozamis overnight routes for them from Cebu but this ship only lasted until just before the mid-1990’s because of engine issues.

The second Don Benjamin was the former Shin Kanaya Maru in Japan and she was built by the Shimoda Dockyard in Shimoda, Japan. This ship measured 61.0 meters by 13.7 meters by 2.9 meters and in Japan her Gross Register Tonnage was 877 tons. Locally her Gross Tonnage was just 685 and her Net Tonnage was just 268 both of which looks suspiciously low. The second Don Benjamin was a smaller ship than Dona Lili.

Don Benjamin

Don Benjamin partially scrapped by Edison Sy

The Don Benjamin was powered by a single Nippon Hatsudoki engine, a generic Japan engine of 2,550 horsepower. That was good for a sustained top speed of 15 knots. However, her engine seems to be the reason for her undoing as Hatsudoki engines are not long lasting and even early in the 1990’s she was already plagued by unreliability. When the new ship Our Lady of Naju came for Carlos A. Gothong Lines in 1994, she was sent to a Navotas breaker. During those times, re-engining then was not yet common. She was a rare ferry that did not last 30 years in service.

The third ferry from Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. was the Dona Casandra, a ship that came also in 1982. She was built as the Mishima in Japan by Hashihama Zosen in Hashihama yard. This ship had the measurements 53.8 meters by 11.0 meters by 3.7 meters, dimensions which were less than the war-surplus “FS” ships. Her Japan Gross Register Tonnage was 487 tons. What I find suspicious in her specifications was her Deadweight Tonnage (DWT) which was only 180 tons in Japan. Was she meant to just carry a few sedans and light trucks?

6835868211_3e6c62cf71_z

Dona Casandra (Credits to Times Journal and Gorio Belen)

Here, after addition of more metal and passenger accommodations her Gross Tonnage rose to 682 but I was not able to obtain her Net Tonnage. The declared passenger capacity of the ferry was 650 persons. The Dona Casandra was powered by two Daihatsu marine engines with a total of 2,000 horsepower and her design speed was 14 knots.

The Dona Casandra did not last long in service because once in a voyage from Butuan to Cebu she foundered on November 21, 1983 in a rough Mindanao Sea experiencing the disturbance of a distant typhoon. She was then carrying lumber aside from passengers. The sinking caused the loss of lives of the bulk of the passengers and crew but the exact number was never established as the ship sank without trace. Was her load to much for her load capacity in DWT and in a rough sea and considering she has added metal to her structure?

The Lorenzo Shipping Corporation also had ships in this list which are about the same size as the mentioned ships of Gothong Lines (once from 1972 to 1979 the two had combined operations). Lorenzo Shipping once was also in passenger shipping and it was even in liner operations albeit not in high profile but later they quit passenger shipping to become an all-cargo operation and maybe that is why many people can’t connect their name to passenger shipping.

The first should be the Dona Okai which was the biggest of the three. This ship was also known as Dona Oka 1 and Don Okai in Lorenzo Shipping. What names! The Dona Okai was paired with another ship of the same size in the fleet of Lorenzo Shipping to do their unique Manila-Dipolog-Zamboanga-Pagadian-Dadiangas route which took nearly two weeks to compete and that is why two ships have to be paired in that route so a weekly schedule can be maintained.

The Dona Okai was originally the Ryoho Maru of the Kashima Kisen K.K. shipping company in Japan. She actually had three owners before coming to the Philippines in 1979. When she was sold to Ebisu Kisen K.K. she was converted into a chemical tanker. When she was sold to Daiei Kaiun K.K. In 1973 she was converted back into cargo ship.

The Dona Okai was a cruiser ship built by the Asakawa Shipbuilding Company in Imabari, Japan. She measured 74.2 meters by 10.5 meters by 5.4 meters. In Japan her Gross Register Tonnage was 1,093 but this rose to 1,173 in the country with a Net Register Tonnage of 780. The ship was equipped with a single Makita engine of 1,500 horsepower which gave her a top speed of 12.5 knots.

In 1992, Lorenzo Shipping sold her into another shipping company. She is now deleted from maritime databases which happens when ten years has passed and there is no further news about the ship. She might be a broken-up ship by now.

1980-2-3 Lorenzo Shipping

Lorenzo Shipping schedule, 2/5/80 (Credits to Times Journal and Gorio Belen

The second ship of Lorenzo Shipping was the Dona Lilian which had the external dimensions of 63.7 meters by 9.6 meters by 4.8 meters and in Japan her Gross Register Tonnage was 753 tons. This ferry was a cruiser ship which arrived in the country in 1978.

The Dona Lilian was the former Seiun Maru No.5 of Tsurumi Kisen K.K. of Japan. She was built by Imabari Zosen in Imabari, Japan. In the Philippines her Gross Register Tonnage remained unchanged and her Net Register Tonnage was 487. She was powered by a single Makita engine of 1,300 horsepower and her sustained top speed was just 11 knots, just about the same as freighters of her size as she is a little low on power.

This Lorenzo ferry held for the company the Iloilo and Pulupandan combined route from Manila and one of the last ferries to sail to Pulupandan as this port can only dock shallow draft vessels then (the reason why when ferries grew in size the route was abandoned). When the company eventually withdrew from the Pulupandan route because it can’t compete with the Negros Navigation ships using Banago port in Bacolod, she found herself on the Davao route. However, on a voyage with two distant typhoons affecting local weather conditions, she foundered in heavy seas off Tandag, Surigao del Sur on December 6, 1982.

Lorenzo Shipping had to other ships in this list, the Don Francisco. This ship was actually the second Don Francisco as there had been an earlier ship by that name in the Lorenzo fleet which was a former “FS” ship converted into passenger-cargo use. When the earlier Don Francisco was lost in the earlier part of the year 1978, this ship came to replace the lost ship in the same year 1978.

The second Don Francisco was first known in Japan as the Zensho Maru of the Marujutoko Unyusoko K.K. shipping company. She was built by the Higaki Shipbuilding Company in Imabari, Japan. Her external dimensions were 53.4 meters by 9.3 meters and her Japan Gross Register Tonnage was 496 and she has a speed of 10.5 knots. In terms of external dimensions, cubic volume and speed, this ship is very much alike the once-dominant former “FS” ships converted into ferry use here. This ship is also a cruiser ship.

The ship shouldered on in various capacity under Lorenzo Shipping until when the company was already taking a step back already from passenger ship (the company later on became an all-cargo company utilizing container ships until she was sold to the Magsaysay Group which continued to use the same name). This ship then disappeared from maritime databases but it is assumed that she did not sink and most likely she had just been quietly scrapped.

Another ship built in 1967 that is no longer around was the former Nadayoshi Maru No.2, a fishing vessel in Japan by Kanasashi Shipbuilding Company in Shizuoka, Japan. In 1974 this ship came into the Philippines and in her first rebuild she was converted into the passenger-cargo ship Gingoog City in 1987 and the name is already suggestive of her route.

In 1991, this ship was sold to the new shipping company Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated (CSLI) which was already expanding their fleet and she became the Filipinas Siargao. This ship measures 49.5 meters by 7.8 meters by 3.6 meters with a Gross Tonnage of 327. Her Net Tonnage of 181 and the passenger capacity is 292 person in bunks as this was an overnight ferry-cruiser. The ship is powered by a single Hanshin engine of 900 horsepower.

8593446482_d29596ce33_z

Filipinas Siargao (Parsed from a framed photo in Cokaliong Tower)

In 1997 the Filipinas Siargao was sold to Ting Guan in Mandaue as scrap because Cokaliong Shipping Lines is already converting to RORO ships. She lasted exactly 30 years.

Another ferry that was built in 1967 that was sold to local breakers under the same conditions in almost the same period but a little later was the beautiful cruiser Sr. San Jose which was even a little bigger than the Filipinas Siargao. The ship was a Cebu to Leyte ferry of the San Juan Shipping of Leyte.

The ship was originally the Tanshu Maru of Kansai Kisen K.K. of Japan. She was built by Hashihama Zosen in Hashihama, Japan. She had three owners in Japan the last of which was the Fukahi Kaiun. The ship had the measurements 54.0 meters by 8.6 meters by 2.3 meters. Her Gross Tonnage was 498 and her Net Tonnage was 185 with a passenger capacity of 558 persons. The Sr. San Jose was powered by a single Akasaka engine of 1,470 horsepower giving her a sustained top speed of 15 knots when new.

The ship together with her company was sold to Lite Ferries in the aftermath of the explosion, burning and sinking of the company’s flagship San Juan Ferry in 2000. When she was sold, Lite Ferries was already fully into ROROs and no further use was needed of her especially since her engines were no longer that good. She was then sold to the breakers.

The next ship on this list is a lost ship but not violently. She was the Princess Camille of the Shipsafe Shipping. The ship had the overnight route Batangas-Romblon but on a voyage on March 21, 2003 she developed a leak in the hull in Romblon port the next day which resulted in her capsizing in the port but her passengers were safe.

sunken ship

Princess Camille remains by Arnel Hutalla

The Princess Camille was the former New Olympia of the Nanbi Kaiun K.K. She was built by the renowned Kanda Shipbuilding Company in Kure, Japan. The measurements of the ship was 39.2 meters by 11.2 meters by 3.4 meters which means she was not a big ferry, just the size of a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO (she is a RORO). Her Gross Tonnage was just 350 and her Net Tonnage was 197. The Princess Camille was equipped with a single Daihatsu engine of 900 horsepower and her top speed was 12 knots. The Princess Camille came to the Philippines when she was already 30 years of age. She reached 36 years of sailing.

The ship was no longer salvaged and her company soon collapsed especially since there was very tight competition then in Southern Tagalog shipping.

There are 13 ferries in this list. Three of the 13 were lost at sea .

One thing I can say is if ferries are no longer relevant then they quit sailing and the shipping owners does not need the government to tell them that.

And another thing is if the engine is no longer good and won’t be re-engined anymore then they also send the ships to the breakers and no government order is also needed for that because on their own shipping owners has enough common sense aside from financial sense.

I now leave it to the readers to weigh the careers of these ferries built in 1967 that are no longer around.

The Sister Ships Stephanie Marie and Starlite Annapolis

These are two sister ships with different owners, routes and home ports in the Philippines and probably their paths do not cross and few are aware one has a sister ship or ever more saw both of them. I wrote about them not because they are that superlative but I think they have some uniqueness and I would like to compare them to a sister ship series that has just started arriving in the Philippines. These are mainly represented by the new ships of Starlite Ferries which all arrived here brand-new from Japan from a big loan package and ostensibly a push for shipping modernization in the Philippines.

One thing I noticed about the new Starlite ferries is their breadth which is on the large or wide end. Few are the 60-meter ferries that have 14 meters as breadth (most have breadths just in the 12 to 13 meter range) but the breadth of the new Starlite Ferries is 15.3 meters. There are just a few ferries in the Philippines that are in the 60-meter class that have 14 meters in breadth but the sister ships Stephanie Marie and Starlite Annapolis have the widest breadth at 14.2 meters and so the new Starlite ferries has an extra 1.1 meters over them.

Steph car deck

The car deck of Stephanie Marie (Photo by Mike Baylon)

Now if this extra breadth converts to an extra lane of rolling cargo I am not sure of that. The average width of a truck or bus is just 3 meters and so in the two older sisters ships that might mean 3 buses or trucks abreast as other portions of the breadth consist of the hull and pathways. At their breadth the buses and trucks will not be too near each other which is important in choppy seas to avoid damage.

But rolling cargo loading in the Philippines is generally mixed with smaller vehicles like sedans, AUVs, SUVs, jeeps and light trucks. Now I don’t know if in a mix the new Starlite ferries will have a higher total number of vehicles (the lengths of the two sets of sister ships are almost the same). In a maritime database the declared rolling cargo capacity of the new Starlite ferries is 21 trucks. I don’t know how this was computed. At 3 abreast then it must be a row of 7 trucks. But the LOA (Length Over-all) is only 67 meters. Is this the Japan 8-meter truck standard and not our long trucks?

I am also interested in the breadths of ROROs because that figure is also needed in estimating the rolling cargo and not just the length. A little extra breadth is actually crucial in packing it in. In the new Starlite ferries they advertised that their stairs are wider. Did the extra 1.1 meters just went into that?

Steph stern

Stephanie Marie is more wide than tall

Before the arrival of the new Starlite ferries, I looked at Stephanie Marie and Starlite Annapolis as the benchmarks in the 60-meter class of ROPAXes. Viewed from the outside it is obvious they are a little wide and their bow design even emphasizes that. Even from the stern these two sister ships looks wide than tall and to think they both have three passenger decks. Well, this illusion is true even from the bow.

15207919165_b6e6688897_z

Just how wide is the Stephanie Marie and Starlite Annapolis? Well, let me state that in many 80-meter ROROs 14 meters is the common breadth like in Reina del Rosario, Filipinas Cebu, Filipinas Ozamis, Filipinas Iligan and Filipinas Butuan (well, the last two is just a shade under 80 meters), to name a few more famous ferries. In fact the 14.2 meters breadth of Stephanie Marie and Starlite Annapolis are wider than most Cebu overnight ships. 14.2 meters is even the breadth of the 90-meter Super Shuttle RORO 2. Actually before the arrival of the former Cebu Ferries ships Starlite Annapolis has the biggest breadth in the Batangas to Mindoro and Roxas to Caticlan ROPAXes. But then those three former Cebu Ferries average over 90 meters in LOA and so they are substantially bigger than the sister ships and that is the reason why now those three are already regarded as liners.

Maybe in that count the two sister ships can be considered superlative. And that is also the characteristic of the new sister ship series of Starlite Ferries, their wide breadth. If that translates into a technical advantage I am not sure of that but probably not. Anyway she has bigger engines than most ships of her class at 3,650 horsepower.

The Stephanie Marie of Aleson Shipping of Zamboanga City came earlier than her sister in 1998. She was built as the Marima III in Japan and she has the ID IMO 8427278. This ship was built by Kanda Shipbuilding in Kawajiri, Japan in 1979 which means if 35-year old ships are phased out then she would have to go. She has two masts, a steel hull, cargo ramps at the bow and stern, a single car deck and three passenger decks.

30939605590_95c383a9d5_k

Stephanie Marie port profile

Stephanie Marie‘s LOA is 63.2 meters with a Length Between Perpendiculars (LBP or LPP) of 60.9 meters. Her Gross Register Tonnage or GRT in Japan was 910 tons but when that was converted into Gross Tonnage or GT here, the modern measure, it fell to 770 even when an additional passenger accommodations were built. Most likely the “MARINA magic meter” came into play here which shrinks the GTs of the ships for considerations. Her declared Net Tonnage or NT is just 316 and that is probably an underestimation too.

The passenger capacity of Stephanie Marie is 956 and this is high because she is a short-distance ferry-RORO just equipped with benches and there are no bunks. She had a large air-conditioned cabin at the front of the ship for the Tourist Class and the very front is actually a lounge and at the side of that is a sort of an open office. Her route is Zamboanga City to Isabela City, the capital of Basilan which has a distance of 14 nautical miles and she does two full voyages a day. A big ship for the route she is seldom full and that gives the passengers a lot of space. But even then she is a profitable ship and there is space in case there is a rush of passengers and vehicles especially since she holds the last trip to Isabela City.

Meanwhile, her sister ship Starlite Annapolis of Starlite Ferries in Batangas City held the Roxas-Caticlan route for Starlite Ferries for a long time although she is rotated too in the Batangas-Calapan route. Those were not her original routes as when the ship first came here in 1999 her first owner was Safeship/Shipsafe, two legal-fiction shipping companies that just operate as one and she was known as Princess Colleen. Her original route was actually Batangas to Romblon, Romblon. However, when their ship Princess Camille capsized in Romblon port in 2003 the company went into a downward spiral and when she became defunct the Princess Colleen was sold to Starlite Ferries. Princess Colleen was the biggest ship of Safeship/Shipsafe.

Starlite Annapolis

Starlite Annapolis port profile (Photo by Raymund Lapus)

Princess Colleen was built as the Yoshinagawa of the Blue Line by Kanda Shipbuilding in Kure, Japan in 1982 and so she is the younger of the two sisters. Her permanent ID is IMO 8125624. She has the same external dimensions as the Stephanie Marie but her original Gross Register Tonnage was bigger at 946 tons. Unlike her sister, however, Starlite Annapolis reflected the increase in her passenger accommodations and so the declared GT here is 1,176 (GT is a dimentionless number hence “tons” is not used) which is nearer to reality. Like her sister ship, she is a three-passenger-deck ship. In the number of masts, hull material, cargo ramps and car deck, she is like her sister ship and visually it is obvious they are sister ships although the passenger deck lay-out of the two ships is a little different.

The declared passenger capacity of Starlite Annapolis is only 704 passengers which is significantly lower than her sister. The reason is Starlite Annapolis has bunks and maybe that is important for the 4-hour crossing of the Tablas Strait at night. Like the Stephanie Marie, the Starlite Annapolis also has a lounge at the front and the cafeteria is superior than of her sister ship. Maybe that is needed because the transit time of Starlite Annapolis is longer whereas the crossing time of Stephanie Marie is just over an hour and there is no night voyage.

6975735261_7e871373fb_b

Stephanie Marie engine room (Photo by Mike Baylon)

In the engine department both ships are equipped with two Daihatsu engines with a total of 3,200 horsepower which is a little high for ROROs their size (and may I note the engine room is too loud when cruising unlike the more modern ROPAXes). Maybe their owners in Japan wanted a little more speed and so their design speeds are both 15 knots which is higher than the design speed (the maximum that can be sustained) of the new Starlite ferries although its power is greater (is that the penalty of having a larger draft?). Of course after three decades of service there is no way the two sisters ships can still run near those speeds and they will be lucky to develop 13 knots now. They might be old, however, but the two are still reliable and profitable ships. I just worry about Starlite Annapolis because her owner is one of the bashers of old ships and he might just simply decide to retire her if he wants to be true to his words.

If there is no forced phasing-out of old ships unlike what is pushed by those who have vested interests, I am sure both these ships will last 40 years or more if the record of the ROROs older than them is studied when some examples are already 50 years now. That is one blessing of having Daihatsu engines which have proven to be very sturdy and long-lasting and parts are easy to source or to re-manufacture. Regarding the hull, I am sure its integrity is still good especially since anodes are in wide use now and it is easy to replace damaged hull plates.

I will still be watching these sister ships in the next few years for I am impressed with them.