The Ship That Might Have Eluded the Grasp of TASLI But Helped Medallion Transport Move in Rank

In this decade, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) has been buying the discards of the other shipping companies. They acquired the Trans-Asia 5 from Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. (CAGLI) which was the former Butuan Bay 1. From Gothong Southern Shipping Lines they acquired in a package deal the Trans-Asia 8 and the Trans-Asia 9 which were the former Dona Rita Sr. and Dona Conchita Sr., respectively. And from Philippine Span Asia Carrier Corp. (PSACC), they acquired the Trans-Asia 10 which was the former Princess of the Earth.

In those acquisitions, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines batted only two out of four as the Trans-Asia 5 and the Trans-Asia 9 did not perform according to expectations. After publicized episodes of her single engine conking out, MARINA (Maritime Industry Authority), the maritime regulatory agency, more than gently suggested something radical be done about the Trans-Asia 5 (actually it was the threat of the cancellation of her Certificate of Public Conveyance). Now she is just a RORO Cargo ship albeit a successful one and her superstructure has already been modified and the passenger accommodations had already been taken out.

Trans-Asia 9 now has episodes of late arrivals and word of it has began to seep out. Even as Dona Conchita Sr., it was already known that her engines were no longer than strong and that was even admitted by her Captain then. For the two ships it is a big sayang as Trans-Asia Shipping Lines really poured money into the two vessels so that they will be good overnight ships (the Trans-Asia 5‘s interiors were superb). However, it was the old engines that failed them.

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Photo by James Gabriel Verallo

These gambles of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines backfired on them. After forgetting what brought them to the top before which was buying good ships from abroad, both cruisers and ROROs, it seems they have lost their leadership of the Visayas-Mindanao routes to Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) which made it a habit to buy ships from abroad every two years. Now their fleet looks modern by local standards while TASLI’s increasingly looks old.

There is actually nothing wrong with buying cast-offs of other shipping companies. It actually depends on the ship one is buying. The Trans-Asia 8 was predicted to be good for them as this ship had a good record in Gothong Southern and it is not yet that old. The Princess of the Earth was also a reliable ship (except recently) for PSACC although she is also getting on in years now.

There was actually a good cast-off that eluded the grasp of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. This was the Love-1 of Moreta Shipping Lines of Manila. When I first saw her docked in Ouano for refitting, I thought she was destined for TASLI. Her length, her size and her speed all screamed she was perfect for the routes of TASLI. This ship was not too old and in Moreta Shipping Lines she was not used heavily because she came when the routes of Moreta was already winding down because of the assault of the intermodal system. Late in her career in Moreta, she was sailing just once a week.

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Photo by Edison Sy

The Love-1 was the former Ferry Okiji in Japan of the Oki Kisen. She measures 93.1 meters (88.3 meters in LBP) by 15.3 meters by 6.0 meters. The length is perfect for TASLI although the breadth is maybe less than what they might desire but then that breadth is better than the 15.0 meters of Trans-Asia 2 and that ship has just an LOA of 88.0 meters. So that means Love-1 is a little bigger than Trans-Asia 2, a ship that TASLI loves.

The design speed of Love-1, the maximum speed that can be sustained when new was 18.5 knots while the design speed of Trans-Asia 2 was only 16 knots. Love-1‘s Daihatsu engines are bigger than the Daihatsu engines of Trans-Asia 2. It is 8,400hp vs 6,000hp. Trans-Asia 2‘s passenger capacity is 655 while the passenger capacity of Love-1 was 790.

Actually, Love-1, though originating from Manila was not a true multi-day liner. She was actually an overnight ship as the length of the voyages of her routes takes less than a day (an overnight run plus a few more hours which was similar to the former WG&A ferries that did the Dumaguit and Roxas City routes). In accommodations, though TASLI is known for top class she is not that far behind. In Ouano, it seemed most of the work done in Love-1 so she will fit the needs of buyer Medallion Transport was the construction of wing passenger ramps which is de rigeaur for Cebu ships and the closing of the side ramps.

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Photo by homepage2.nifty

The Ferry Okiji was built by Kanda Shipbuilding Company in Kure, Japan in 1979 (the same year Trans-Asia 10 was built). In Japan she had 2,584gt which rose to 3,184gt here because of the additional metal for the Economy class. Her net tonnage is 964 which looks to be understated. Since she was doing the Okinawa route in Japan which is in the open sea, her sides are high. Her permanent ID is IMO 7927099.

This ferry was sold to Moreta Lines in 2004, a few months after the Roxas-Caticlan route that connected Mindoro and Panay islands was opened. She mainly did the Dumaguit and Roxas City route for Moreta Shipping Lines although she was also used for the San Jose, Occidental Mindoro route of the company. In the middle of the 2000’s, WG&A along with Negros Navigation was already vacating Dumaguit and Roxas City routes due to the onslaught of the intermodal trucks and buses.

Moreta Shipping Lines still tried though but even before the end of the last decade it was obvious the ship from Manila won’t last against the buses and the trucks which were multiplying in the route year after year. Love-1 found herself increasingly not being used and at times she was just tied up in North Harbor along with the other ships of the company which were Nikki and Conchita.

Soon, Moreta Shipping Lines offered for sale her three ferries to just concentrate on container shipping. In 2011, Conchita went to Besta Shipping Lines and became the Baleno 168. In 2013, in a package deal, Love-1 and Nikki went to Medallion Transport which was a surprise since before this all the Medallion Shipping had were ships the size of basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs which they try to fit on overnight routes. The only bigger ship they had was the double-ended RORO Lady of Miraculous Medal which is 46.0 meters in length.

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Lady of Love in Cebu for conversion to Lady of Love (Photo by James Gabriel Verallo)

The Love-1 became the Lady of Love. I had a laugh when I heard the name from her guard in Ouano. At first I am not sure if he was pulling my leg. But the name became true and she became a Medallion Transport ferry doing the Cebu-Palompon route which was a new route for the company. This route was overlooked by the other shipping companies doing the Cebu-Leyte routes. Few realized it then that it was a good alternative to the Cebu-Ormoc route like the Cebu-Baybay route.

Cokaliong Shipping Lines was the one doing the Cebu-Palompon route after the smaller shipping companies on that route sunk. But they had no ship permanently fielded there and were just using the 7th day of their ships. Lady of Love has an easy entry because she can match the ships of Cokaliong toe-to-toe and she was even better than the lesser ships of CSLI. With rolling rates more competitive than those offered in Cebu-Ormoc route, soon her car deck was full of trucks and other vehicles.

Passengers also began to notice she was superior than the ships of Roble Shipping and Lite Ferries that were doing the Cebu-Ormoc route. Even her passenger fares were competitive. And she is fast. I once saw her docking in Cebu at 1:30 in the morning. I thought those passengers still going to the northern and southern tip of Cebu have the chance to arrive there by breakfast time should they decide to disembark and go to CNBT or CST.

Now the route of Roble Shipping to Naval, Biliran is already kaput. For rolling cargo, the Palompon route to Biliran is a good alternative especially if the rates are cheaper. Besides, Palompon is also a good and nearer entry to the towns of the northwest corner of Leyte island which has lost their ships from Cebu. Palompon is also a good entry to the towns of Isabel and Matag-ob.

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The Lady of Love proved to be an ace for Medallion Transport which now has a roaring route to Palompon. She also elevated Medallion Transport to the first rank of Cebu-Leyte shipping companies from a second-run position. I even wonder now if Roble Shipping or Lite Ferries can claim that they have a ship better or equal than Lady of Love. The Lady of Love became the queen of the Cebu-Leyte ships and ironically she is not even doing the premier Cebu-Ormoc route.

I just wonder why TASLI did not make a bid for Love-1. Was the package for Nikki a deterrent? But that can be sold if they do not want it (it is too small for TASLI maybe except for their Tagbilaran-Cagayan de Oro route).

Now TASLI obviously looks that they lack passenger ships. I just wonder had the two ships instead went to them. Without the two Medallion Transport can’t claim parity with Roble and Lite in the Cebu-Leyte routes. And TASLI would not have been wanting for passenger ships and they might have had a ship to match the Filipinas Cebu of Cokaliong in the Cebu-Iloilo route.

Maybe it was not in the cards that Love-1 would go to TASLI. Maybe what was in the cards is Medallion Transport would reach first rank in the Cebu-Leyte routes through the Lady of Love and Lady of All Nations (the name of the Nikki in their fleet).

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The Lady of Love certainly helped Medallion Transport establish itself. But then good things certainly does not last and last year engine problems disabled the ferry and she was laid up for half a year and the Lady of All Nations had to carry the load for two routes, the Palompon and the Bato routes. That was certainly a heavy load for an old ferry which was also laid up for half a year after her own share of engine troubles.

The PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) was told the Lady of Love was waiting for parts from Japan. Well, if re-manufacturing of parts are needed the waiting time is certainly months long. I was told only Japan and Singapore do this kind of job with the former supposedly having better quality. So, for the last few months, the Lady of Love was laid up in Ouano north of the E. Ouano House. She was monitored to do sea trials where she did 15 knots until she “hibernated” again.

Then suddenly a news exploded! The Lady of Love will be doing a Cebu-Surigao route and enter Mindanao and that was just a few days ago. That route was the base of the weakest ferries of Cokaliong Shipping Lines as they have a monopoly of this route after their competitor Cebu Ferries quit the Vismin routes to go elsewhere supposedly for greener pastures.

But not to be outdone and become the butt of jokes, Cokaliong suddenly diverted a good ferry of theirs, the Filipinas Cebu which was formerly doing a Cebu-Iloilo route to run head-on with the Lady of Love (therefore the match happened in another route). So the languid Cebu-Surigao route suddenly had a marquee match-up. The Lady of Love is thought to be the flagship of Medallion Transport, she being their best ship. Meanwhile, many also think the Filipinas Cebu is the flagship of Cokaliong Shipping given her name and route assignment.

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In terms of speed like what was shown in their first night match-up, the Lady of Love will have a slight edge having a higher design speed although she is the older ship. In amenities, the Lady of Love will probably not cede anything being formerly a Manila ship and the best ship of Moreta Shipping. A member of PSSS, James Verallo said in terms of restaurant and food, the Lady of Love has the edge. In passenger service and cleanliness, Cokaliong Shipping is known for that and I wonder if the Lady of Love will be a match.

All in all, the two ferries might be able to slug it out toe-to-toe and so the decisive thing that another member of PSSS Badz Bado weighed in might be the fares. I myself might add the cargo rates can also be decisive. Medallion Transport has the record that when it entered Palompon she suddenly offered the cheapest rolling rates and it was Cokaliong which she challenged there. So this new match of them is like a rubber match. It seems Medallion Transport does not fear challenging Cokaliong in its home route.

I commend Medallion Transport for having the guts to enter the Vismin route, stirring the pot and making it lively again after years of stagnation because of the tailspin of Cebu Ferries and the obvious lack of gusto shown by Trans-Asia Shipping in the last few years. I also criticize two Cebu shipping companies that were ahead of Medallion Transport but which pussyfooted a lot. The two are Roble Shipping and Lite Shipping.

Long ago, the former has a franchise to Nasipit but didn’t serve it. Lately, they had a ship named after Oroquieta in Misamis Occidental, the Oroquieta Stars but they were just using it in a Leyte route. So until now that company has no route to Mindanao when to think the gates to the Vismin route had long been left open by Cebu Ferries.

Meanwhile, Lite Shipping has been able to open two Vismin routes. One of this is their route to Plaridel in Misamis Occidental which seemed to form part of the reason of the demise of Palacio Lines. But in the over-all scheme of Mindanao, Plaridel is just a minor route. It only becomes greater because it also connects to Siquijor and Bohol and becomes the connection of the migrants of the two provinces to Mindanao.

More than a year ago, Lite Shipping used their old Lite Ferry 8 to open a route to Cagayan de Oro. I applaud them for their efforts to extend the life of that old ferry which they even re-engined but for that route that ship is outgunned and maybe that was the reason they have to offer half off the fares. For the size of Lite Shipping which is in a race to match the number of ferries of Montenegro Shipping Lines, they should already be able to afford a ferry worth the premier route to Mindanao from Cebu.

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Photo by John Carlos Cabanillas

I just hope that with this move of Medallion Transport those two mentioned companies will feel challenged. It is certainly time for them to enter new routes and ports. And if they need some “brave pills”, they can maybe ask who is the supplier of that to Montenegro Lines which suddenly entered the dangerous and overcrowded Zamboanga-Jolo route. Well, Roble also tried to enter that route via the Theresian Stars shipping company but then they have a powerful politician of Sulu as partner to that venture.

Who will be the winner then? It will be the riding public and the shippers, of course, as usual.

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A Quartet of Sister Ships

The Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2 of Lite Ferries, the Maria Helena of Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. and the Danica Joy of Aleson Shipping Lines share one thing in common which is a common hull design making them all as sister ships. The four were built in different yards and in different years and they have different engines but they share the same superstructure too making them similar from afar though many do not realize that immediately. They also sailed at one time not far from each other and some might even have met in Dumaguete port.

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Among the four, it was Omogo which came first to the Philippines in 1987 from Setonaikai Kisen KK of Hiroshima, Japan to become the Danilo 1 of Danilo Lines. The Sensui Maru of the same Japan company followed in 1989 and she became the Danilo 2 of Danilo Lines. Actually, the two are among our early ferries, a product of the right bet of Danilo Lines on ROROs when they connected the ports of San Carlos and Toledo across the Tanon Strait dividing Negros and Cebu islands. When Danilo Lines was acquired by Lite Shipping Corporation, Danilo 1 became the Lite Ferry 1 and Danilo 2 became the Lite Ferry 2. Officially, however, the two ships still belong to Danilo Lines which was not dissolved yet but everybody knows now they are under Lite Ferries and other ships of Lite Ferries periodically relieve them now in the route and sometimes the two ships are assigned other routes of Lite Ferries.

The third to arrive in the country was the Danica Joy and she was one of the early ROROs of Aleson Shipping Lines when she came in 1994. The last to arrive was the Maria Helena which only came in 2004 after a stint in China with the Qingdao Ferry. Belonging to different companies, the quartet of sister ships have different home ports, the Lite Ferries in Cebu, Danica Joy in Zamboanga and the Maria Helena in Batangas.

Among the four, three were built in 1969 which are the two Lite Ferries and the Maria Helena. The Danica Joy, meanwhile was built in 1972. The Lite Ferry 1 was built by Kanda Zosensho in Kure yard, Japan. The Lite Ferry 2, though having the same owner in Japan was built by a different shipyard in the same year. She was built by Matsuura Tekko in Higashino yard, Japan.

Meanwhile, the Maria Helena was built as the Yanai by Nakamura Shipbuilding and Engineering Works in Yanai yard, Japan for Boyo Kisen KK of Yanai, Japan. She went to China as the Lu Jiao Du 1 in 1993. Lastly, the Danica Joy was built as the Nakajima by Nakamura Zosen in Matsue yard, Japan. [Note: Danica Joy is the same ship as the earlier Danica Joy 1.]

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Photo by James Gabriel Verallo

Lite Ferry 1 has the permanent ID IMO 7005530. Lite Ferry 2 has the permanent ID IMO 6926969. That means her keel was laid ahead of Lite Ferry 1. Maria Helena is also identified as IMO 7535274 and Danica Joy is IMO 7852414. I do not know why the IMO Numbers of Maria Helena and Danica Joy are out of sequence.

The four are not basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs but belongs to the next class higher which are over 40 meters in length (in fact, just below 50 meters LOA). The distinguishing characteristic of the four is the rectangular box at the front or bow of the ship which serves as protection for rain, sea splash and rogue waves. The four looks rectangular from the sides. All except Danica Joy have full two passenger decks here and a single car deck (Danica Joy just have a partial second passenger deck).

The car decks of the four have three lanes and four trucks or buses can be accommodated in each lane (more if it is sedans, SUVs or jeeps). Originally and until now, the four have RORO ramps at the bow and at the stern although all basically just use the stern ramp now for handling rolling cargo hence they dock stern-wise.

All the four have combined bunks and seats so all can be used either as a short-distance RORO or as an overnight ship. All have an airconditioned Tourist class and the usual open-air Economy class. The size of the Tourist class varies among the four, however and so do the passenger capacity. Maria Helena has the smallest passenger capacity among the four at only 310 passengers.

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Maria Helena by John Carlos Cabanillas

The gross tonnage (GT) of Maria Helena might be a little bloated at over 1,000, a pattern I noticed among ships that passed through China (if it is compared to its Japan GT). Meanwhile, the GT of the three others might be a little understated because it was practically unchanged from the Japan GT (when scantlings were added to ships). Until now, the Philippines have no true reliable GT figures (because MARINA does not know how to compute that?).

The four sister ships are equipped with a pair of Daihatsu marine main engines. Three have a total of 2,000 horsepower but the Lite Ferry 2 only has a total of 1,700 horsepower making it the slowest at 13 knots when new. Lite Ferry 1 was capable of 13.5 knots when new while the two others were capable of 14 knots when new. Realistically, they are only capable now of 11-12 knots given their age and the additional metal. Some might even sail at just 10 knots given the demand of the route.

The quartet all have raked bows and transom sterns. All have two masts and two funnels at the sides. However, only Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2 have stern passenger ramps which is a trademark of Cebu overnight ferries. This design does not interfere with the car or cargo loading of the ship. This is not possible with Maria Helena because she has no full scantling.

The four have no permanent assigned routes. The nearest to having a permanent route is the Danica Joy in the Dumaguete-Dapitan (Pulauan) route where she was the first short-distance RORO with bunks. Montenegro Lines always rotate their ships but for a time Maria Helena was always in the Bogo-Cataingan route. Meanwhile, Lite Ferries always rotate their ships every so few months.

These four are all starting to advance in years now. However, all are still very reliable. Their metal seems to be still good too. So I don’t see them quitting anytime soon as all are still good ferries especially in the short routes, the routes that loads a dozen vehicles and a few hundred passengers.

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If there is anything that will kill them it will be the wrong proposal being pushed now by some quarters to retire ferries that are over 35 years in age. As if safety in ships is determined by the age of the ships when empirically it is not. Actually, it is vested interests and not just concern for safety that is fueling that push.

Anyway, I hope to see this quartet continue to sail for many more years. They are still capable ferries.

Note: It is possible that Ruby-1 or Ruby-2 of Alexis Shipping that plied the Batangas-Calapan route is also a sister ship of the four. But they are already missing.

The Danica Joy 2

The Danica Joy 2 is unique among local ferries because it is the only one with a foreign route, that is, to the port of Sandakan in Sabah, Malaysia. No other ferry has that distinction. Glan port in Sarangani province might have a connection to Indonesia but it is Indonesian ferries which sail the route. However, soon maybe with the establishment of the Kudat-Bataraza route linking Sabah and Palawan Danica Joy 2 might lose that distinction as a local ferry is slated to do that route. Malaysian ferries are not interested to do a route to the Philippines because the near islands to them are underdeveloped and it is us who needs products as their goods are much cheaper than ours except for “sin” products which is illegal in their land like alcoholic drinks and we have plenty of that. Besides, we are also very well known for piracy and kidnapping, or at least the Abu Sayyaf is.

The Danica Joy 2 is not really a big ship. She is actually much smaller than the Lady Mary Joy which pioneered the route to Sabah at least in the legal realm. What I mean is from Zamboanga, Jolo, Bongao and other islands there are wooden cargo-passenger motor boats called Moro boats in PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) and junko or lancha in the place which makes run to Sabah. Most of these are unregistered and in all cases they have no ferry franchises from MARINA, the local maritime authority. But it is known by all that they run otherwise how could we have such an big “illegal” population in Sabah and how could be there so many “barter” goods in southwest Mindanao that reach even Cebu and Davao. Many of our islands near Sabah are almost completely dependent on fuel from that Malaysian territory and that dependence even extends to cooking oil, rice, cigarettes and many other grocery products and it is these junko or lanchas that carry them.

Danica Joy 2 also carries back “barter” goods but in limited amounts per passenger otherwise it will already be considered as “smuggling”. Just what constitutes the “legal” amount, well, there is no hard and fast rule in the area but if you ask the Customs and especially the Department of Finance all those should be levied import duties (well, it is their duty to suck as much amount from the citizenry). But Danica Joy 2 is the more “legal” means to buy from Sabah compared to the junko or lancha which suffers seizures of goods now and then (of course the authorities would show “they are doing their job”). I don’t know exactly why but the Sandakan fare of Danica Joy 2 is almost triple compared to Bongao when the difference in distance between them from Zamboanga is not great. Maybe some of the fare is for “protection” and not only from authorities but also from the pirates.

Danica Joy 2 is more like an overnight ship but with her Zamboanga-Jolo-Sandakan route she functions like a multi-day liner. However, her capacity to feed her passengers is limited if compared to the true Manila liners. In southwestern Philippines that is the weakness of the ferries and even their dining areas is limited. That is why passengers bring their own food and the role of food vendors inside the pier becomes important. However, in Zamboanga because it is an ISPS (International System of Port Security) port, the vendors are often harassed and their goods thrown to the sea. They know the faces of the vendors, they can even require IDs but it seems they would rather follow foreign impositions than understand the welfare of the passengers and the vendors (as if they have no social value). These vendors are actually the cheaper offerer of food and drinks to the passengers. Every passenger knows passenger needs are much more expensive aboard the ship.

People in the Visayas will probably understand more the limited size of Danica Joy 2 if I say that she is the sister ship of the Asia Philippines of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Incorporated (TASLI). However, they have different builders but just the same they really resemble each other. Danica Joy 2 was built by Nakamura Shipbuilding & Engine Works in Yanai yard in Japan as the Orange Hope of the shipping company Shikoku Ferry in Japan in 1982 and she carried the ID IMO 8135253. She is only 62.7 meters in length over-all, 12.0 meters in breadth and 4.5 meters in depth. Her original gross register tonnage was 974 tons. She is actually smaller than almost all of the overnight ferries of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. and Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. For more comparison let it be said that she only matches the Filipinas Dapitan and Filipinas Dinagat in size.dj2-port

After 16 years of sailing in Japan, Orange Hope came to the Philippines when she was acquired by the Aleson Shipping Lines of Zamboanga in 1998. This was amid the great expansion not only of the company but also by competitors in Zamboanga which left some bankrupt later. She was refitted in Varadero de Recodo, the favorite shipyard of Aleson Shipping Lines. In refitting, additional scantling were built and she became a two-passenger-deck ferry and she became an overnight ship featuring an all-bunks accommodation. Her original route was Zamboanga-Jolo which is an overnight route.

With refitting, her gross tonnage only increased minimally from 974 to 998 which is below that of her sister ship Asia Philippines and her net tonnage was declared to be 491. Danica Joy 2 is a medium speed ferry capable of 16 knots when new. This comes from a pair of Daihatsu marine engines with a total of 4,000 horsepower. Now she often sails at 13 knots only. However, there was a time, a few years ago, when Danica Joy 2 was unreliable and sometimes tugs have to be sent out to her rescue. She was then known for announcing her arrival with thick smoke on the horizon (people on the docks can identify her on the horizon with that). But the more aggressive Aleson Shipping scions opened their checkbooks, major repairs were done to the engines and she is now a reliable ship once more with less smoke.

The Danica Joy 2 accommodates 636 passengers in 3 classes – Cabin, Tourist and Economy. The cabins are built locally indicating she was not used for long distances in Japan and the doors were in fact too plain-looking. The Tourist class and the Economy class are the usual Economy that can be found in other overnight ferries with the Economy at the stern also and in two decks which is normal pattern. In Economy there is no bunk number associated with the ticket purchased. Since it does not get full or overfull it is more of a “first come, choose first basis”. The early birds choose the breezier portions, of course.

This ferry has no stern passenger ramps nor of flying passenger ramps on the sides. What it has are side ramps that fold to the side, Zamboanga-style. But it is well-organized since from that ramp one will find a catwalk on the side above the car deck. If a passenger is bound for the Economy section he or she then turns to the stern. If the passenger is bound for Tourist or Cabin he or she heads to the bow. From the catwalk there are stairs to the decks above. For the upper classes upon entering one sees the front desk or information counter (that is rare in a Zamboanga ship). The Tourist section is on the lower passenger deck and the Cabin is on the upper passenger deck.

What is another unusual lay-out for Danica Joy 2 is right after the information counter comes the ship’s restaurant and besides that is the store (it is not a kiosk). Actually it is a clever lay-out because Economy passengers can access those without going through the Tourist section. The ship’s restaurant is a combination of modern and old. Aside from curvaceous plastic chairs there are also the old iron, holed chairs which is an Aleson Shipping trademark. Meals are not part of the ticket and what is served are very basic and instant meals. In Zamboanga, in multi-day ships passengers are advised to bring their own food or seek food from the vendors in the intermediate ports or outside.dj2-rest

I have been to the bridge of this ship. It is a decent bridge with the lay-out and instrumentation of the medium-size ferries of her era and nothing fancy. Behind the bridge, as usual are the cabins of the top deck and engine officers of the ships and on the stern of the uppermost deck is another restaurant, the mess hall for the crew. It is pretty decent and it is called the “McBobords” complete with the arches of McDonald’s.dj2-bridge

The car/cargo deck of this ship is interesting to watch. Unlike all other Zamboanga ships the load is mainly containers as in XEUs (ten-foot container vans) and it is moved by forklifts carried aboard by the ship. The use of container vans is for the security of the merchandise and not for ease of loading and unloading. And maybe to also hide the (barter) goods from prying eyes, greedy hands and smoochers in uniform. Probably the transaction of “grease” is also per container basis and bahala na kung ano ang nasa loob (no more pricing of what’s inside the containers). Everybody knows the cargo from Sandakan is primarily “barter” goods. Semi-finished furniture of good wood is also one of the “imports” from Sabah.dj2-car-deck

Danica Joy 2 became a Sandakan ship only when Lady Mary Joy 2, a much better and bigger ship was sold to the breakers because it was not making making money and it was too big for the overnight Zamboanga routes. But the original route of that starts from Cebu. It failed because Aleson Shipping Lines didn’t realize Visayans are too fearful of Zamboanga and didn’t know the economic possibilities of Sandakan or Sabah. That was the time when the Ramos administration was pitching the BIMP-EAGA integration which simply failed to get off the ground. Besides, the local producers’ lobbies are simply too strong and opposing (well, even now). And our consumers are simply too clueless to realize the potential benefits for them in lower prices and more choices.

Once a week, on her off-Sandakan route, Danica Joy 2 will also sail the Zamboanga-Jolo route, her original route.

Danica Joy 2 will still sail a long time because she is needed in the route. Trade realities might change (as in Zamboanga barter weakened because Manila importers are now permitted to import direct from Singapore) because there are simply too many Muslim Filipinos in Sabah and they need a transport to Zamboanga for that.

For me the social function is the more important function of Danica Joy 2, not the trade function.

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When An Overnight Ship Not High On The Cebu Totem Pole Of Ships Became Highly Regarded in Batangas

Before 2009, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) already had a problem with their Asia Hongkong as it was no longer that reliable. This ship had quadruple engines and to transfer the power generated by that two synchronizers are used. As said in the mechanical world, more complications means more possibility of failure. Or more maintenance and probably more trouble. Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was not lucky with that kind of arrangement with their sister ships Trans-Asia and Asia China which happened to have quadruple Niigata engines too. Sulpicio Lines was not lucky too with that kind of arrangement with the quadruple Pielsticks of their Princess of New Unity.

Asia Hongkong was sold to Montenegro Shipping Lines, Inc. of Batangas and this company has the patience and the resources to nurse back ailing ships to become reliable once more. And after half a year of so and after some unreliability early on they were able to nurse back Asia Hongkong which was now known as the Reina del Rosario. As Asia Hongkong this ship was not highly rated in Cebu which has a lot of good overnight ships, the type where this ship belongs. Ahead of her then in Cebu was nearly 20 overnight ship better than her. And so when news filtered back to Cebu that Reina del Rosario was well-appreciated in Batangas, it drew some laughs.

The problem actually lies in Batangas shipping. For too long they did not really invest in good overnight ships. For distances and voyage durations that last half a night including loading time and waiting, they will make do with benches and just let passengers try to curl in there or else hang their heads on the bench ahead of them. A survey of their passengers at midnight is a scene of various levels of discomfort and lack of sleep.

This problem started during the time of the dominance of Viva Shipping Lines. For overnight routes they will use ships simply equipped with benches and very poor toilet facilities. It took for Paciencio Balbon of MARINA to end this after a long struggle. Even after Viva Shipping Lines sank, their successors never learned how to make their passengers more comfortable. Or to really learn and invest in passenger service. Well, they will even skimp on ships’ scantlings just to save a little money. For me, it is obvious they don’t really care for the passengers’ comfort.

Meanwhile, since there is competition in Cebu and there is pride among the shipping owners, the ships of Cebu were better in everything. From the very start there is a Suite Class or at the very least a First Class Cabin. Those classes were completely foreign in Batangas then. If Cebu overnight ships have restaurants, in Batangas the highest equivalent will be a small kiosk with no meals offered. And they do not know how to spell “lounge” in Batangas because it simply cannot be found there then. If there is a front desk in Cebu ships, there is none of that in Batangas ships. Ask for linen (beddings) or towel, well, they have never heard of that in Batangas.

In Cebu, when they use a small RORO as an overnight or night ferry they will try to convert part of the accommodations equipped with bunks. And even have a small, airconditioned Tourist section. Well, if a ship arrives early, they won’t force you down. It is your free “lodging” until you wake up. That is not the practice in Batangas ships.

That was the reason why Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario, an old ship not high in Cebu rankings got appreciated in Batangas. Suddenly, Batangas passengers learned there is something better. And the aircon is even cooler. This was the time the Cebu Ferries were not yet Batangas Ferries. Now when that trio came, they easily set new standards in Batangas shipping, a standard that has not yet been matched until now. But before they came, Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario set the new standards in comfort among Batangas ships.

Asia Hongkong/Reina del Rosario started her career in Japan as the Hakodate Maru No. 10 of Hakodate Shosen KK. She was once a ferry connecting Hokkaido island to the main island of Honshu (ferries are now gone there when the tunnel was built). This ferry was built Narasaki Zosen in their Muroran yard in 1971 but it was Hakodate Dock that completed the ship. The ship is a RORO (Roll On, Roll Off) ship with bow and stern ramps for loading vehicles on the single-level car deck. The ship originally has only one passenger deck with the bridge on a deck higher than that. The ship has no full scantling in Japan.

Hakodate Maru No. 10 has a raked stem and a transom stem, two masts and two funnels. The external dimensions are 82.8 meters length over-all (LOA), 76.2 meters length between perpendiculars (LBP) and a breadth (B) of 14.0 meters. The original gross register tonnage (GRT) was 1,034 and the original deadweight tonnage (DWT) was 1,495. Her four Niigata engines totalled 5,320 horsepower and her top speed was 17 knots when new. She has about 300 lane-meters of rolling cargo space. Her permanent ID is IMO 7109465.

In 1978, she was sold to Higashi Nippon Ferry KK, a source of many ships that came to the Philippines including the Asia Brunei of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. After 10 more years, she was sold to the Philippines and she became the Asia Korea of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. In refitting, the scantling and deck was extended to the stern and a second passenger deck was added. Initially, the second deck was not extended full to the stern and it served a poop deck and observation deck. And in line with Trans-Asia’s common design, a barbecue place was built there next to the canteen and restaurant (these are two separate facilities in Trans-Asia Shipping Company.

With the extensions the gross tonnage of the ship rose to 1,842 and with further extensions this eventually rose to 2,093 with the net tonnage now 1,350. The passenger capacity then rose to 784 with the majority of it in Economy class. The deadweight tonnage (DWT) was practically unchanged (this does not necessarily change). However, her speed was down to about 15 knots due to age and the added weight.

The ship became a four-class ship with Suite, First Class Cabin, Tourist and the usual open-air Economy for the masses. The new deck and the extension of the first or lower deck became the Economy sections. An upper-class restaurant and a lounge was also present in the airconditioned portion that held the higher classes. The barbecue place, canteen and restaurant near the poop deck was open for all (after all barbecue is always a hit among Visayans).

Asia Korea was not the usual overnight ferry ship of Cebu because its original route was Cebu-Iloilo-Zamboanga-General Santos City (and that explains her accommodations and amenities that were later appreciated in Batangas). That was the time when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines still had long routes. Her role was actually that of a multi-day liner much like the Asia Japan which came in the same year as Asia Korea that had a Cebu-Dumaguete-Dapitan-Zamboanga route. This was also the time when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was still a Zamboanga player in the passenger segment of the market.

Later, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines withdrew from their long routes and she was assigned to the other major routes of the company. Heading into the mid-1990’s, the shipping competition was getting fierce as there was optimism in the shipping sector and many invested when President Fidel Ramos rolled out his liberation and modernization program. In her original route she was being slowly squeezed by the superior liners coming from Manila especially in the Iloilo-Zamboanga-General Santos segment and cargo in her route from Cebu to Zamboanga or vice-versa is not that strong.

Withdrawn from her route she was assigned to the different major routes of the company as Trans-Asia Shipping Lines also rotate their ships. But to avoid confusion let it be said that this is a different ship from the smaller Asia South Korea which grounded and sank near Bantayan island. Actually to avoid confusion Asia Korea was renamed as the Asia Hongkong.

In the latter days with Trans-Asia Shipping Lines when her engines are no longer that strong Asia Hongkong was assigned the shorter Tagbilaran-Cagayan de Oro route of the company which was probably the shortest remaining route of the company then.

In 2009 she was sold to Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) and she was renamed as the Reina del Rosario and officially under that company early on but currently she is now under their legal-fiction company Marina Ferries Inc. In that twin company, as an overnight ferry company, she is usually assigned the overnight Batangas-Odiongan route although at times she can be found on other routes.

Her passenger capacity rose again to 930 with internal modifications. Her usual maintained speed is 11-12 knots. I just wonder if in Batangas people realize she is the sister ship of the dead San Lorenzo Ruiz of the defunct Sto. Domingo Shipping Lines, a legal-fiction company of Viva Shipping Lines which was the Hakodate No. 11 in Japan. The scantling of that ship was not full so the resemblance is not that great. The San Lorenzo Ruiz was gone in the early 2000’s with the bankruptcy of her company. For clarity, let is be said that this ship is different from the San Lorenzo Ruiz, a liner of the Negros Navigation Company.

Reina del Rosario is now a reliable ship as her new owner is good in maintaining old ships and have the resources to lengthen their lives. She is the biggest ship in Montenegro Shipping Lines/Marina Ferries which is a testament that Cebu ferries are bigger than Batangas ferries.

I guess Batanguenos (and Romblomanons) will still be seeing her for a long time. Well, unless Art Tugade gets his way and treat ships as if their lifespan are just as good as the buses, wrongly.

[Photo from a framed TASLI photo.]

The Second Lite Ferry 10

I call this ship the second Lite Ferry 10 because there was an earlier one to bear that name in Lite Shipping Corporation which is more commonly known as Lite Ferries. The first Lite Ferry 10 was a small double-ended RORO which was used in the Cebu-Tubigon route. She was the former Ferry Ezaki No. 11 of the Ezaki Land and Sea Transport of Japan and she came to Lite Ferries in 2009. Subsequently, this ship was sold to Medallion Transport Inc. where she became the Lady of Miraculous Medal and used in the Masbate-Pio Duran, Albay route. Maybe she was sold by Lite Ferries because her passenger capacity is limited and maybe also because Ocean King I became available and was more fit for the needs of Lite Ferries.

The second Lite Ferry 10 was the former Ocean King I of Seamarine Transport Inc., a new Cebu shipping operator then. This was a new company started only in 2009 and they were only able to acquire two ships for their fleet. As a new company in the Camotes Sea/Bohol Strait area that was a little crowded, the company was not able to stabilize a route. Among the other routes they tried was the Liloan-Lipata route which was also crowded especially since there is a competing parallel route, the Benit-Lipata route held by Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. or MSLI. The first RORO ship they tried in this route was their Ocean King II. However, in a few months of sailing, that ship met an accident and capsized (but not sunk) in Benit port. To hold on to the route and since she has no other good route, Seamarine Transport Inc. transferred Ocean King I to the Liloan-Lipata route.

Built as an overnight ship and much bigger than Ocean King II, Ocean King I was a little of an anomaly in that route which has the characteristics of the short-distance ferry route although ferries run even at night. But some tired passengers actually appreciated her because she has an airconditioned Tourist section with bunks aside from also having bunks in Economy. The only problem was the 3-hour cruising time was not really enough to enjoy those accommodations or to wake up really refreshed after being already more than 24 hours on the road. The only other complaint was that the airconditioned accommodation was too cold. She was the only overnight ferry in that route connecting Leyte and Surigao.

Aside from the bunks, there is one feature that truckers and bus drivers appreciated in her that was not present in the other ships sailing to Lipata, whether from Liloan or Benit. Ocean King I was equipped with three-piece hydraulic ramps. So whatever the situation of the tide the vehicles have no problem loading or unloading. And besides having a three-piece hydraulic ramp means the ship moves less when the swells are active.

She was then holding the morning route from Liloan to Lipata and she goes back to that same port from Lipata in the afternoon and she will have a night lay-over in Liloan port. Her Economy fare was P300 but I can’t understand why people balk at the P400 Tourist fare. Maybe that was a little high compared to Camotes Sea routes if the distances are factored in (36 nautical miles versus an average of 55 nautical miles in the Cebu-Leyte routes and the most a Tourist fare there will be P500 and there are Economy fares that are only P300). But fares are really high in the eastern seaboard because they make the passengers pay unwittingly the cost of the discounts they give to the buses and the trucks which regularly cross (the suki). Ocean King I, however, had the disadvantage then that its Economy section is hot because the superstructure fully encompasses the ship. That superstructure was an inheritance from her design in Japan.

Ocean King I and Lite Ferry 10 was known as the Ferry Yamato in Japan and she was owned and operated by the Kochi Sea Line. This ship was built in Japan by Miura Shipbuilding Company in their Miura shipyard in 1987. She then measured 63.0 meters by 12.0 meters with a Gross Tonnage (GT) of 1,020 nominal tons and a loading capacity of 423 tons which was measured in Deadweight Tonnage (DWT). She was equipped with two Niigata marine diesels with a total of 3,200 horsepower shafted to two propellers and her original sustained top speed was 16 knots. She had a unique design. Being thin, she look long and not only that. Her superstructure in the forward stern section were very low but she has a very high bridge. She does not look like the ordinary ship from Japan.

She was refitted and converted in Ouano wharf in Mandaue. An additional deck was built and after that she already look more like a regular ship. However, her bridge still stood out. The front added section became the Tourist section of the ship. The rear of that held the Economy section and in between the two is a very small kiosk which also masqueraded as the “front desk”. She still looked sleek with her long and sharp bow. Passenger walkways were added on each side of the ship but still there is a very long passenger ramp at the stern.

She was actually already a beautiful ship especially with her raked funnels. She had a declared passenger capacity of 452 persons and her Net Tonnage (NT) rose to 679 nominal tons. However, her declared length her rose to 72.0 meters. Now, even though her superstructure gained in size her Gross Tonnage remained at 1,020 nominal tons. Of course this is a concession from MARINA, the local maritime regular for maybe “considerations”. And so the “magic meter” was applied. However with the added weight and the engines not that healthy anymore, all she can do locally was 13 knots maximum.

After two years in the Liloan-Lipata route she was pulled out. Maybe she was not earning especially since her engines are a little big. Her schedules were not really favorable too. A mid-morning departure from Liloan means most vehicle from afar have not yet reached Liloan. And a 1pm departure from Lipata means too that most vehicles crossing the Surigao Strait have not yet reached Lipata. While her car deck is bigger than most in the route, many of the trucks and buses crossing Surigao Strait was already contracted by the other ferries in the route. It is a suki-suki system with with the suki held by heavy discounts.

Like the Bachelor bus pays only P800 then when the advertised rate is P8,000. This is so because, rightly or wrongly, the passengers still pay for the ferry fare and that can be more than P8,000 worth. This is the system in almost any short-distance route that loads buses – they charge the buses low since the passengers still pay. Actually the buses don’t really pay anything because the bus ticket fare actually has hidden charges which I found out because I can computer the fare by the kilometers. That means they charge additional fare when the ferry was actually not running land kilometers because it is crossing the sea. Philtranco also does this and they gave me another ticket when I protested. But as they defended, “You don’t have to carry your baggage anymore”.

Ocean King I then tried some Cebu-Leyte and some Cebu-Bohol routes. We suggested to the Captain a Cebu-Palompon route (this was before Medallion Transport discovered this route; as a note, she withdrew too early in Liloan-Lipata route; in not a long time there was already long queues of trucks there). Then Lite Ferries chartered her for the Cebu-Tagbilaran route. Later, the arrangement went into a direct sale and she became the second Lite Ferry 10. As Lite Ferry 10, her route extends now up to Siquijor and Plaridel in Misamis Occidental.

Not long after acquiring her, Lite Ferries brought her in Tayud, Cebu for another conversion and refitting. Two passenger deck were added to her and her tall bridge deck now has a passenger deck. Her superstructure was cut and more “windows” appeared on her superstructure and those were slanted in a beautiful way and so now she looks sleekier. With that her Economy section is no longer as stuffy.

Her Gross Tonnage should have come up with an additional deck. But her Gross Tonnage actually went down to 999. Her Net Tonnage is now 679 nominal tons. Her length went back 63.6 meters with a depth of 4.0meters. With those changes her passenger capacity which should be over 700 persons by now. Maybe Lite Ferries also did those alterations so she will have a Cabin class that was not available before.

She is probably the most beautiful ship of Lite Ferries as viewed from the outside. She is also one of the biggest. The only one clear-cut bigger than her is Lite Ferry 8 which was once a Negros Navigation liner. Although her Captain as Ocean King I admitted her engines were not that strong anymore, he was really referring to the speed and not to reliability as she is still a a very reliable ship. Engines getting grey and weak is actually not that much of a problem anymore as surplus and brand-new replacement engines are already readily available in the market. In fact in the Lite Ferries fleet, the Lite Ferry 5, the Lite Ferry 8 and the Lite Ferry 20 were recipients of the re-engining treatment.

This is one ferry that will still last long and she is a beauty to watch. She will turn out to be a good buy for Lite Ferries.