When The PSSS Went To The Fiesta of Tagbilaran City

Some years back when 2GO was still ATS (Aboitiz Transport System), the Philippine Ship Spotters Society (PSSS) had a tour-meet in Cebu and as usual many of its leaders came from all over the country. We had the usual tour of Cebu Port, Muelle Osmena, the Mactan bridge, Ouano along with some shipyards. Part of the meet, of course, is the usual talks and camaraderie and that will include some eat-all-you-can stuff. And over the years the favorite EAYC place of PSSS became Joven’s in Parkmall. The restaurant became the respite of the group when it became overheated and fagged out. Ship spotting not only needs sturdy legs but also liters of fluids and sustenance after all the trying efforts under sun.

In those days I was still staying in a hotel and I usually choose one which is near Cebu Port for convenience, of course. It was easy to walk to the pier area and take shots even if alone. Usually, there is also a vantage point in the hotel where one can take shots. Members will visit me there if free for some talks and friendship. Plans are also hatched and in this tour the fiesta of Tagbilaran was vaguely mentioned as a Moderator who is Vinze Sanchez will be going home for the said occasion.

While having a rest in the hotel, I received a text message asking if I was interested in going to the Tagbilaran fiesta together with some members. I said “Why not?” although my mind was a little foggy. I was unbelieving if it was possible as the fiesta is already on the next day and it is part of lore that rides to Bohol are so full during summer especially on fiestas (and that even includes the buses from Manila). I also remember that when a former Japanese member of PSSS wanted to tour Bohol on a moment’s notice that he had to call a very high-ranking Aboitiz scion for intervention to be able to secure a ticket. And it took him many hours even though that Aboitiz scion had the rank of Vice-President, if I remember it right. I then went back to sleep thinking my schedule will be unchanged.

Not long after I was awakened by another message telling me we already had tickets in SuperCat. I was in disbelief as we were an additional four excluding Vinze. I was thinking, “Holy cow, how was Vinze able to pull it off?” when the Japanese group was only two. And now we will be five in all, all in one catamaran and on Vinze’s exact schedule. I was amazed but suddenly I remembered that Vinze has an access to the SuperCat reservation system (I can tell this now as the SuperCat situation already changed over the years and Vinze no longer rides the SuperCat regularly as he is now abroad). As they say in Systems Operation the weakest link is the human link and Vinze had an trump card on that.

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And so we went to the SuperCat terminal and frankly I was expecting a hassle of some kind (to me our trip seemed too good to be true). However, there was no hassle whatsoever, only smiles from the employees that know Vinze and that included his friend who rigged the system. I can only shake my head at the thought that a few people won’t make it to their fiesta as they had been bumped off. I felt pangs of guilt as they would have been too disappointed and will be scrambling to get another ride. I know the usual spiel. “Overbooking”.  Now I realized that regular “pasalubongs” and “pakikisama” go a long, long way.

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Upon boarding SuperCat 26 we only put our bags in our assigned seats and forthwith we proceeded to the catamaran’s  bridge. I saw a white man who got startled. I also saw another white took notice of five men in a procession to and opening the door of the bridge which is officially off limits even to most of the crew. I know what was on the head of the startled whites. “Hijack!”. We as a country are notorious after all in the Western embassies’ advisories.

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We were soon in the bridge of the catamaran and Vinze introduced us to Captain Sunga (he is not working locally so he is safe), the co-Captain and the Chief Engineer. They were the three officers occupying the bridge and there were only seats for three. The seats had belts and with armrests and it looked comfortable. The Chief Engineer was monitoring the engines through a CCTV and through instruments and controls in the bridge. No need for a command to the engine room. Joysticks were in command of the ship from the speed to the direction. However, a bridge designed for three was a little jampacked for eight people and I was glad the cat’s officer bore with us. It was of course illegal to stay on the bridge and it violates the operations manuals. However, in our country friendships go a long way. I heard about the simulator given by Vinze to the Captain which is not only entertaining while waiting for the next trip but improves maneuvering skills, too.

We were given an introduction of the bridge system and its instruments, its functions and how it helps the bridge officers. We were a little piqued with what is showing in the radar. The SuperCat was designed after all to operate even in nighttime. I noticed that as the craft sped the Captains always jerked the joysticks but I failed to ask why. All through the voyage we bridge visitors were in standing position but we enjoyed it. Anyway, how often would one be treated to a “Bridge Class” accommodation and a whole group at that? It was also enjoyable to watch the views come and pass by in a bridge. It was really different compared when one is in the passenger compartment. Besides we were able to ask a lot of questions enriching our knowledge of cats and of the routes.5981095965_5faa89f09f_b

SuperCat 26 ECDIS

Tagbilaran port came and we had to bid goodbye to the officers. Some of the passengers had an askance look at us. It is maybe because they noticed that five seats were vacant throughout the voyage and it was too noticeable in a full-packed small craft and probably they asked where were we or they noticed where we went. I don’t know if there was a tinge of envy in the looks. For me personally I was a little ashamed. I do not want such attention when I receive some special privilege. Maybe I am already too old for bragging rights haha!

We arrived the night before the fiesta and we just idled and talked the night away, If there will be a tour of the city during the fiesta itself I found out it was not in the works. No parades or spectacles but just plenty more of stories and camaraderie. Of course we met Vinze’s kins and we ate at the home of the No. 1 Councilor of Tagbilaran (we saw him again in Vinze’s wedding). The food was sumptuous and I took a liking for the lechon which is actually not a good food for my health. I ate a lot and my companions noticed and ribbed me for it. I did not care as I was simply enjoying the trip. If I had a worry it was our trip back but I kept quiet for the moment lest I ruin the fun.

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Our group was an eclectic one. If Vinze is from Bohol, I was from Davao and three were from Manila (one had Bohol origins and two had Mindoro origins but I noticed all three had doctor parents). But we are all friends now and we really wanted to experience the Tagbilaran fiesta. These meets are where we get to know each other well and where true friendships are forged.

We did not stay another overnight in Tagbilaran. We actually wanted to take the last ferry out of Tagbilaran, sleep in it and save on hotel expense (the fare was more or less equal to an single aircon hotel room). We were all on a budget and this was the wise course. The ferry leaves at 10pm and this was the Our Lady of Barangay–1 of Lite Ferries which has a sleeping accommodation. We thought it was perfect for our “pagtitipid” (which is skimping like what is done by backpack travelers). Imagine a “hotel room” traveling at sea. That was what our ride should be.

However, when we arrived in Tagbilaran Port there was a problem. The ferry was fully booked, the Lite Ferries ticketing office at the pier said. But having been a traveler for almost all of my life I knew it was not an impossible situation. There had to be a way, there had to be a vacancy because not all that reserved tickets and not all ticket holders would show up especially since it was a fiesta and people forgets the time or are held up. The only question in my mind was if there were enough bunks. I was prepared in any way to just sit up in the ship somewhere as long as we are able to board the ship. And so we begged the Lite Ferries people and camped in the port terminal building. While camped in the empty terminal we were actually in good spirits.

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Just before departure time we got the signal that we can board. I saw my companions perk up. Aboard the ship we were herded to Business Class which was located on the lowest passenger compartment near the bow of the ship at the car deck (and so the sloshing of the water is audible). There were benches there. And so i thought there was where they accommodate overflow passengers. They told us to wait as they will check which bunks were empty. It was obvious to my eyes there were some empty bunks. The question is if we can be all accommodated in Business Class. I saw that the Tourist Class was full and a little crowded.

The Purser counted. Yes, we can all be accommodated in Business Class and the Purser proceeded to issue us our tickets. It was cheaper than an aircon hotel room which was a good deal as were traveling at the same time, we had a bed (a bunk really) to sleep on and with linen (which they call “beddings” aboard a ship) to boot. I noticed early that the air-conditioner of the Business Class was too cold but that was the least of my worries. I just wanted to sleep as I was tired and a little stressed by the ticketing/boarding hassle which was no fault of the shipping company.

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Our ship arrived in Cebu at dawn as expected after a six-hour voyage. I told my companions there was no need to disembark early. We have no hotel rooms to go back to anyway and our ship accommodation was a perfect waiting area. Cebu overnight ships are gracious enough not to wake the passengers early and they let their guests which means the passengers continue their sleep until there was enough light.

I had also another idea why I don’t want the group to get down early. We were inside the port premises and because of ISPS (International System of Port Security) one can’t get inside it unless one is a passenger. My idea is since we were inside already is we will take the opportunity to ship spot at first light and I know the guards won’t really be in a position to challenge and shoo us away.

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Our Lady of the Barangay – 1 at dawn

When the first light was breaking there came the Lady of Angels of Medallion Transport coming in. Soon after she docked the passengers and the vehicles came down, of course, and it was a good ship spotting opportunity along with some other ships passing by. We were then between Piers 2 and 3 of Cebu Port.

When the port was already bathed in light I told the group we better board a docked ferry because if we don’t the guards will see and challenge us. Aboard a ship it is only the Captain which can challenge us and to Captains of small ferries of small shipping companies “gate crashers” are the least of his worries. Some are even glad there are people who visit and appreciate their ship. A vessel is a peaceful ship spotting platform for ships passing by and docking nearby.

The ship we boarded was the Fiji-I of the South Pacific Transport Corp. It was a cruiser ship built locally in a shipyard (the Fortune ShipWorks in Tayud) that is also controlled by its owners. The crew not sleeping were friendly and welcoming and they let us free roam of the bridge and we were also able to view the engines. It is just like old times when ships and crew didn’t treat people they didn’t know as potential terrorists or saboteurs. Actually it is only the USA which is too squeamish of people in contact with ships because people there commit massacres every now and then. That kind of violence is completely unknown in our country. Deadly psychopaths are only concentrated in the USA.

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We then decided to end our ship spotting activity. Hunger and thirst were already catching up on us and we needed to refill ourselves. And so we hied off to our breakfast with the guards wondering from what ship we came from as there is no new arrival.

All in all it was a good ship spotting adventure. We were able to experience “Bridge Class” in a SuperCat, enjoyed Tagbilaran hospitality with plenty of food and good stories and we were lucky we did not sleep over in the pier and we had a free dormitory-type hotel room that was sailing at sea that brought us back to Cebu again.

If some will think that was the end of our Tagbilaran adventures, nope. We had another visit but as they say that is a different story. Abangan!

 

[Photos by Mike Baylon and Vinze Sanchez]

 

 

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Lite Ferries

Many people know this shipping company simply as “Lite Ferries”. The name of their ships now start with “Danilo Lines Incorporated” and then a number, hence, people easily make the connection . Actually their ships are numbered now (as of May 2017) from Lite Ferry 1 to Lite Ferry 30. Well, even their official website refers to the company as “Lite Ferries”

Lite Ferries is actually the amalgamation of three shipping companies — the Lite Shipping Corporation, the Sunline Shipping Corporation and Danilo Lines Incorporated. The mother company of this combined shipping corporation is Lirio Shipping Corporation which is into cargo shipping. It is not a big shipping company on its own, however, but the big company Lite Ferries started from that.

Lite Ferries is connected to Bohol, the place of origin of the founder Lucio Lim which still has various business interests in that island-province including in Panglao development. In a sense, many in Bohol has a new company to root for after the demise of Sweet Lines, the old favorite and pride of Bol-anons. However, the nerve center of Lite Ferries’ operation is now Cebu City although they still use a Tagbilaran address.

It is hard not to discuss now Lite Ferries because in this decade its ship acquisitions continued almost yearly and almost always multiple ship in a year and its acquisitions have accelerated since 2009. From a second-tier Cebu passenger shipping company, it now has the most ferries in the Visayas. Their ferries are mainly of medium size for non-liners but with their numbers they now cover more routes and their competitors are now feeling their presence and weight.

Lite Ferries started ferry operations in a limited way in 1992 when it was able to acquire the triple-screwed LCT St. Mark, a surplus ship of the US Navy built in 1964 which has limited passenger accommodations like most conventional LCTs. Lite Ferries used this ship to connect Cebu and Bohol via Argao and Loon. Argao is the southern link of Cebu province to Bohol and with it there is no need for a vehicle to still go to Cebu port. In a later renaming of their ships, the LCT St. Mark became the Lite Ferry 20. She was by then a re-engined ship with just two screws.

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The Lite Ferry 20

In 1994, Lite Ferries acquired the former Horai Maru No. 12 in Japan and in the company this ferry became the Sta. Lucia de Bohol which betrayed the place origin of the company. This ship was a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO with external dimensions of just 32.0 meters length of 8.0 meters beam by 3.0 meters depth with a Gross Tonnage of 199. Sadly this ship is no longer around.

Lite Ferries then acquired the former Hayabusa in Japan in 1996 and she became the Lite Ferry, without a number. This was not a small ship for she measured 88.0 meters by 15.0 meters by 4.8 meters in L x B x D with a Gross Tonnage of 1,389 and she had a Cebu to Ozamis route. Maybe in Lite Ferries this ship was too big for them then and so they sold this ship to Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Incorporated (TASLI) where she became the Trans-Asia II.

After this, Lite Ferries was able to acquire the rump of the fleet of San Juan Shipping Corporation. That company plummeted after the loss in an explosion and fire and subsequent sinking of their biggest ship, the San Juan Ferry which was the former Dona Cristina of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Incorporated (CAGLI) and Cebu Ferries Corporation. From San Juan Shipping Corporation, Lite Ferries was able to acquire the Sr. San Jose, a beautiful cruiser but with a weak engine and the John Carrier-1, a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO with problematic engines also. The important thing this purchase gave Lite Ferries were not the ships and these were not used by Lite Ferries for long. Actually, it was the important franchises and route to Leyte which they did not have before and which proved profitable for them in the long run.

In 2004, Lite Ferries acquired the Salve Juliana of the MBRS Shipping Lines of Romblon which was then disposing their earlier ships as it has already acquired bigger ones. This ship became the Sr. San Jose de Tagbilaran (in that period many of the ships of Lite Ferries were still named after saints) and it seems it is this ferry that displaced the Sta. Lucia de Bohol in the Tagbilaran route. Later this ship was also assigned to the Ormoc route. When the ships of Lite Ferries were renamed to “Lite Ferry”, she became the Lite Ferry 6.

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The Lite Ferry 6

The next year, in 2005, Lite Ferries acquired the former Daishin Maru and made her into a small overnight ferry-RORO. Her dimensions were only 42.6 meters by 11.5 meters by 3.0 meters and forward part of the car deck has to be converted in Tourist accommodation to increase her passenger capacity. The ship was first known as the Our Lady of Barangay-1. Her engines were later not strong and she was put up for sale. When there were no takers, Lite Ferries had her re-engined and now she is known as the Lite Ferry 5 and still sailing for Lite Ferries in her original route which is the Tagbilaran route.

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The Lite Ferry 5

In 2005, Lite Ferries acquired the former Shodoshima Maru No.1 which was the former Zhu Du No.2 in China. In the Lite Ferries fleet she was first known as the San Ramon de Bohol with a flat bow ramp. Later, Lite Ferries fitted her with a conventional pointed bow thereby adding to her length (but I wonder what other things were gained by that). In the renaming of their ships, this became the Lite Ferry 7.

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The Lite Ferry 7

Many will ask where is Lite Ferry 1, Lite Ferry 2 and Lite Ferry 3? Lite Ferries was able to acquire the shipping company Danilo Lines which served the San Carlos-Toledo route in 2006 and the two main ships of that fleet, the Danilo 1 and Danilo 2 became the Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2, respectively. The two are actually sister ships and they are actually sister ships too to Lite Ferry 6. Danilo Lines actually has two wooden ships, the Danilo III and Danilo IV but those were not transferred to Lite Ferries anymore which by that time was just sticking to ROROs (well, they even had the Sr. San Jose cut up).

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The Lite Ferry 1

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The Lite Ferry 2

The Lite Ferry 3 was also acquired in 2006. This was the former Noumi No.8 in Japan and she became the second Santiago de Bohol in the Lite Ferries fleet. As an overnight ferry-RORO, the Lite Ferry 3 is small and she has just the external dimensions of a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO at 38.3 meters by 9.0 meters by 2.9 meters with a Gross Tonnage of just 250 but she has one-and-a-half passenger decks. The Lite Ferry 3 is now the shortest ship in the fleet of Lite Ferries.

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The Lite Ferry 3

In 2007, Lite Ferries bought again a relatively big ship, the former GP Ferry-1 of George & Peter Lines which was the former small liner Sta. Maria of Negros Navigation Company. This was no longer renamed to a saint and she directly became the Lite Ferry 8. The ship was fielded to the Ormoc route to battle the Heaven Stars of Roble Shipping Incorporated which by then was having engine unreliability already. Soon after her rival was laid up, Lite Ferry 8‘s engines also began acting up also and so she was spending half of her time laid up. Lite Ferry decided to have her re-engined and the ship was used for Lite Ferry’s foray to Cagayan de Oro.

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The Lite Ferry 8

The next year, in 2008, Lite Ferries purchased a second-hand LCT from the Socor Shipping Lines, the former LCT Socor 1. Like the Lite Ferry 20m she was over 50 meters in length at 55.4 meters but like the conventional LCT, her passenger capacity is small. She was initially named as LCT Sto. Nino de Bohol in the Lite Ferries fleet before she was renamed to Lite Ferry 22.

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The Lite Ferry 22 by James Gabriel Verallo

In 2009, Lite Ferries made a decision to acquire double-ended ferries and this was a surprise to me given the nature of her routes which are not very short actually. In their routes, the double-ended ferries can actually suffer because of the drag and sometimes the lack of speed and their characteristic of having not to maneuver might just be negated.

The Lite Ferry 9 which was actually a beautiful double-ended ferry was the former Daian No.8 and relatively new when acquired in 2009 because the ship was built just in 1997. She was not really small at 45.0 meters length, 10.0 meters breadth and 2.8 meters depth. Her Gross Tonnage was only 170 and her Net Tonnage is only 89 which is small. That is so because double-ended ferries cannot maximize their passenger deck up to the stern of the ship. Now this ship is no longer in the fleet of Lite Ferries and might have been sold elsewhere.

In the Lite Ferry 10, another double-ended ferry, Lite Ferries tried to increase passenger space by adding scantling and bunks. With limitations this ship can also serve as an overnight ferry-RORO and there was not much of a problem with that since its route is only to Tubigon which is some two hours sailing distance away. The ships is also not that small at 46.0 meters by 10.0 meters by 3.8 meters with a Net Tonnage of 165. However, like in Lite Ferry 9, maybe double-ended ferries are not really fit for them and so Lite Ferries sold this ship to Medallion Transport in 2011 where she became the Lady of Miraculous Medal.

Later, another Lite Ferry 10 came into the fleet of Lite Ferries which arrived first as a charter and later a purchase. This ship was the former Ocean King I of Seamarine Transport Incorporated. Ocean King I was an overnight ferry -RORO which abandoned the Liloan-Lipata route and then tried the Leyte route without going anywhere. Lite Ferries then took over her and Seamarine Transport became defunct. Lite Ferry 10 is bigger and has more capacity than the other overnight ferries of Lite Ferries because she has 3 passenger decks.

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The second Lite Ferry 10 by James Gabriel Verallo

In 2010, Lite Ferries acquired 4 surplus ferries. None of them was the expensive kind but as the norm in the Philippines those can be converted into valuable ferries and they were refitted simultaneously in Ouano wharf.

The biggest of the 4 became the Lite Ferry 11 and this was the Misaki No.5 of Oishi Shipping in Japan. In international maritime databases, she is mistaken for the Lite Ferry 12 maybe because that is what reflected is in the AIS transmissions. The Lite Ferry 11 measures 65.7 meters by 15 meters by 3.5 meters but her Gross Tonnage of 498 in Japan shrank to 249 here even when decks were added. The Lite Ferry 11 is now the primary ship of Lite Ferries in the Ormoc route.

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The Lite Ferry 11

The Lite Ferry 12 is a pocket overnight ferry-RORO with a registered length of just 41.6 meters, a breadth of 9.6 meters, a depth of 5.6 meters (which is rather deep) and just a Gross Tonnage of 249 which is low. This ship I found to be densely packed, so to speak. The Lite Ferry 12 rotates among many routes of Lite Ferries but she was the ship that opened the Nasipit-Jagna route for her company.

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The Lite Ferry 12

There is no Lite Ferry 13 (nor a Lite Ferry 4) because those numbers are usually not used by local shipping companies out of superstition. There is also not a Lite Ferry 14 but I don’t know the reason for that. Maybe the owner is just averse to that number.

The Lite Ferry 15 is almost the size of Lite Ferry 11 at 60.3 meters length, 11.4 meters beam and a Gross Tonnage of 827 with a Net Tonnage of 562. From twin Akasaka engines, she has 2,600 horsepower on tap which is higher than the 2,000 horsepower of Lite Ferry 1, Lite Ferry 6 and Lite Ferry 7 but below the 3,000 horsepower of Lite Ferry 11. Most of the time this ship holds the Cagayan de Oro to Jagna route of the company.

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The Lite Ferry 15

The fourth ship to be acquired in 2010, the Lite Ferry 23 is very unique and there is no other of her kind in the country. It is a RORO and looks like an LCT from the side but it has a catamaran hull and so she is wider at 16.0 meters (her registered length is 57.5 meters). Attached and rigged to the stern before were two pusher tugs (in Japan those were free). Two funnels were attached to the ship here because there are now passengers. Modifications were made so a passenger deck could be added to the ship which is a little bigger than the average LCT.

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The Lite Ferry 23

Initially, Lite Ferry 23 was a slow craft barely able to do 7 knots and so she was just assigned the Mandaue to Tubigon route which caters basically to rolling cargo. Later, the tugs were removed and she was given two decent engines and now she can do what a short-distance ferry can do. Still, she is doing the same route and basically catering to rolling cargo with a few passengers mixed in.

2011 was a respite year for Lite Ferries and they did not acquire any ship. But in 2012 they acquired the LCT Dona Trinidad 1 of Candano Shipping Lines, a Bicol shipping company. This ship first became the LCT Sta. Filomena de Bohol and like the other LCT in the Lite Ferries fleet she is over 50 meters at 53.5 meters. Shortly later, this ferry was renamed to Lite Ferry 21.

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The Lite Ferry 21

In the same year 2012, Lite Ferries acquired a brand-new LCT from China, the Lite Ferry 25. Maybe this was the sign that in the future Lite Ferries will also be relying on this type of ship and mainly for rolling cargo with a few passengers mixed in. During this time China LCTs which are cheap (but which has questions on engine reliability) already had an allure for local shipping operators and maybe the Lite Ferry 25 was the test purchase of Lite Ferries from China. The size of this ship is almost the same as the other LCTs of Lite Ferries at 58.0 meters length. Some modifications to the ship was made to increase the passenger capacity.

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The Lite Ferry 25

In 2012, Lite Ferries also ventured into HSC (High Speed Crafts) operation when they acquired the beautiful and modern-looking Japan fastcraft Lite Jet 1 (which are not powered by waterjets anyway). She was fielded in the Tubigon route where the new company Star Crafts was making a heyday. Maybe they perceived the fastcrafts of this company as a threat to their ROROs in Tubigon as it multiplied fast. The Lite Jet 1 was more modern and faster than the Star Crafts.

Next year, in 2013, Lite Ferries acquired two more HSCs but this time from Vietnam. These were actually the former Aquan One and Aquan Two in Hongkong and they were the Nonan 1 and Nonan 2 in Vietnam and both were catamarans built in China. On conduction here one of the two grounded in the Spratly islands and it took longer to be fielded. The Aquan Two/Nonan 2 was named the Lite Jet 8 while the Aquan One/Nonan 1 was named the Lite Jet 9.

These two catamarans proved problematic and hard for the technical resources of Lite Ferries which has not much HSC experience. MTU engines are fast but needs attention to maintenance and can be problematic when it gets old. This is the engine of of the Lite Jet 8. On the other hand, the Lite Jet 9 was powered by Isotta-Fraschini engines, a make not that well-known in the HSC field. That proved balky and slower and Lite Ferries tried to re-engine it with Caterpillar engines.

Not long after, however, Lite Ferries completely gave up and sold all their High Speed Crafts including their good and reliable Oceanjet 1 to Ocean Fast Ferries Incorporated which operates the now-dominant Oceanjet HSCs. Maybe Lite Ferries realized that High Speed Crafts are not their cup of tea and they just better concentrate on RORO operations which they understand deeply as shown by their successful successful expansion.

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The Lite Ferry 26

With this divestment, Lite Ferries bought out two Cargo RORO LCTs that came and challenged them in the Cebu-Tagbilaran route which was proving to be a serious threat to them. These were the Diomicka and the Maria Dulce which were just chartered ships. With the buy-out in 2015, the Diomicka became the Lite Ferry 26 and the Maria Dulce became the Lite Ferry 28. These 2 LCTs are the only ships in the fleet of Lite Ferries that do not carry passengers.

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The Lite Ferry 28

With the remainder, in 2015, Lite Ferries continued the China experiment and purchased another brand-new LCT but which has a different design than the Lite Ferry 25. This was the Lite Ferry 27. It has a taller tower and and modifications were made so there will be two short passenger decks. Bunks were even provided (Lite Ferries is one of the shipping companies that combine bunks with seats). Like the Lite Ferry 25, this LCT is also powered by Weichai engines.

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The Lite Ferry 27

At the same time of acquiring the Lite Ferry 27, Lite Ferries uncorked a new China experiment (well, their patron seems to really have strong China connections). Among these were two laid up Hainan Strait Shipping Company (HNSS) vessels that once connected Hainan island to the China mainland and which they acquired in 2015 and 2016. When the two arrived here they all looked very rusty but to the knowing they know once refitted the two will become beautiful and useful ferries (is there a rust that cannot be removed?).

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The Lite Ferry 16

The two were renamed to Lite Ferry 16 and Lite Ferry 19 look to be modified LCTs with a car ramp at the bow and two partial decks of passenger accommodations below the bridge where one extend to near amidship which means the passenger area is far higher than the conventional LCT. With extensions of both decks that becomes passenger promenades, the feeling of being too enclosed in an LCT with nowhere to go is gone. Lite Ferry 16 and Lite Ferry 19 look to be sister ships.

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The Lite Ferry 19 by Mark Ocul

Two other rusty ferries from China which are sister ships also arrived for Lite Ferries in 2016, the Bao Dao 5 and the Bao Dao 6 which will become the Lite Ferry 17 and Lite Ferry 18. The two looks to be conventional ROROs with the bridge at the bow and with car ramps at the bow and the stern. When finished, at 89.0 meters length and 16.0 meters breadth, these two ships will give Lite Ferries a size that can already challenge the ships of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated and Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Incorporated and it is titillating to think where Lite Ferries intend to field the two.

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The Lite Ferry 18 and Lite Ferry 17 by Mark Ocul

While three of these rusty ships were still being refitted, Lite Ferries also took delivery of another two brand-new LCTs from China, the Lite Ferry 29 and the Lite Ferry 30 which look sleek for an LCT. Slight modifications were also made in Ouano wharf to build passenger accommodations a la Lite Ferry 27. Right now these two LCTs which are obviously sister ships are now sailing.

Lite Ferry 29

The Lite Ferry 29 by Edison Sy

Lite Ferry 30

The Lite Ferry 30 by R. Sanchez

Currently at the start of June 2017, Lite Ferries have 23 ferries that are ROPAXes plus 2 Cargo RORO LCTs. Of the 23 ferries, 9 are passenger-cargo LCTs while 1 is a passenger-cargo catamaran-RORO. Lite Ferries might have started behind other Cebu shipping companies as they are a relatively new company but with their turbo expansion in the last few years they have already overtaken most other operators of medium sized ferries and not only in the Visayas.

Aside from the old routes from Cebu to the Bohol ports of Tagbilaran and Tubigon and the route from Mandaue to Tubigon, the Cebu to Ormoc route is another old route that is a stronghold of Lite Ferries. That also includes the old route of Danilo Lines, the San Carlos-Toledo route.

Lite Ferries also serves the Cebu-Tagbilaran-Larena-Plaridel route that was already abandoned by Palacio Shipping. They were also successful in the expansion to the Cagayan de Oro to Jagna route. However, their Nasipit-Jagna route seems to be little seasonal. Recently they also tried the Cebu to Cagayan de Oro route.

Their Samboan to Dapitan route also proved successful as they offered a shortcut to the truckers that once had to go to Dumaguete first. They are also connecting Cebu to Negros with the Samboan to Sibulan route. A PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) member recently called and he was told the Dumaguete-Cagayan de Oro route is already off.

But with such a great fleet now Lite Ferries is seriously needing to expand already and I just hope they go to the underserved routes. With many profitable routes already they can actually afford to experiment with new routes now.

The expansion of Lite Ferries in the last 8 years is simply breathtaking with 17 ships added net. Lately their fleet addition even accelerated. They now have a critical mass and I will be watching where they will be headed.

Liners like the old Bohol shipping great Sweet Lines?