My First Cebu Tour Last December

My first Cebu tour in my long travel happened after I planed in to Cebu and I was met by Mark at the airport. After lunch there, instead of going to Cebu via Mandaue (and suffer its bad traffic), we made our way to Muelle Osmena in Lapu-lapu City to ride the Metro Ferry. Riding this ferry is the easiest way to cover the various ports and piers of Cebu from Ouano (House) up to Cebu Pier 2. From Pier 3, Mark and me went to the ticketing office of Roble Shipping to secure our passage to Baybay for our trip to Tacloban to be with the PSSS tour from Tacloban to Matnog and back.

After securing our tickets me and Mark parted ways in front of the new Robinson’s Galleria which is near Pier 4. I then haled a taxi for Ouano wharf near the Mandaue market but the driver said a car can’t enter Ouano with its deep muck. I assented but upon reaching the corner entering Ouano I directed him instead to the parallel road I once knew that was adjacent to the SMC Shipping & Lighterage facility that once was the alternate access to Ouano wharf.

amtc-ouano

Turning right into that road, I was surprised it was full of trucks that will be loaded for Asian Marine Transport Corporation or AMTC. I thought I was mistaken but then we came to a gate bearing the AMTC mark. My driver asked for entry inside but the guard said I should just enter by myself. I paid my fare and soon I was already inside the new facility of AMTC, the wharf they transferred to after they were evicted from their former wharf in Pier 8. I can’t believe it was so easy to get in when the gate looked imposing from outside.

I asked about their Mandaue to Batangas trip inside one of their offices there which are converted container vans (but airconditioned). They said the Super Shuttle RORO 3 was just on trial voyage to Cagayan de Oro. That ship has not been running for about a year already but I was interested in it because it offers a direct and cheap passage to Batangas from Cebu and I have not dropped yet my plan to shipspot Batangas and Calapan. They gave me a number and they took my number but it became useless as there was no cellphone signal in the next days because of fears of bombings in the Sinulog activities.

31818554324_3975ac3748_z

Snoopy inside the AMTC facility in Ouano

From the office I tried to make a round of the new facility of AMTC. There were actually some other customers inside their facility that were transacting rolling cargoes so I was not the only outsider. One thing I immediately noticed is the tanker Snoopy which supplies acid to San Miguel Corporation in Cebu was still docked in its usual place. Maybe part of the lease of AMTC with Ouano said it could not be touched.

It was not that easy to roam the new AMTC facility. The old road by the wharf was already destroyed by all the movements of the heavy equipment and the weight of the container vans. However, the inner portion when a container yard should be already has new concrete.

Docked there were the Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and the Super Shuttle RORO 9. It was the first time I saw the latter ship near. I made my way to Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and I was able to talk to a friendly officer. He said they were making some repairs because a previous typhoon dragged her anchor and she ended up beached. It happened when she had no crew onboard. They let me tour the ship and I was happy because I haven’t boarded yet this ship before. She was very similar to any other basic, short-distance ferry-RORO in terms of arrangement. Well, after all they came from one basic design in Japan.

4309

Though the Super Shuttle RORO 9 was just nearby I did not try to board her anymore. Too many people around there as there were works on the ship. I also was able to tour that ship already before. Besides, I also wanted to go to the other side of the fence to the remaining half of the old Ouano wharf by the market while there was still enough light. I also wanted to see the changes there, if there were any and photograph the ships there too.

I went out by foot and took a pedicab near the old wharf entrance. I found out that there was no way to get inside by foot as all footpaths are covered by deep muck. In the near portion were the usual ships doing Afloat Ship Repair (ASR) plus again some basnigs. The ships on ASR then were the Lite Ferry 7, the Filipinas Dinagat and the West Ocean 1. I found a friendly officer and so I boarded the Lite Ferry 7 again although I had already toured her before. There was no significant change inside her.

4340

Lite Ferry 7 and a basnig

On the far end by the wall dividing it and AMTC, I found the LCT Akira and the LCT Poseidon 19 docked. The Cargo RORO LCT Akira of Ocean Transport was discharging container vans. However, her access to their container yard was already cut off by the new AMTC facility and they have to use the muddy main road. I wonder if they were happy with the change. Meanwhile, LCT Poseidon 19 was just on standby without load or cargo movement.

The usual canteen that PSSS shipspotters patronize was still there and the wall of AMTC is touching its side already. So gone from the place were Eliezer Shipworks, a fine subcontractor for ship refitting works and the junk shop adjacent it. Feeling hungry and thirsty, I ordered merienda from the canteen. The lady there recalls me. She even asked where were my usual companions (it seems she remembers we order a lot of her softdrinks when we drop by her place).

Had a small talk with her. She said her business dropped 50% since the AMTC facility was built. She also said other contributary factors were the moving out of the Lite Ferries LCTs to the Ouano-House (that was the first time I knew they were no longer there). She said the passengers were complaining that with the muck one is forced to take the pedicab (whose drivers are taking advantage of the situation by doubling their fare to P20 for a distance of 200 meters; well, it is also hard going for them).

4333

I soon bade the canteen owner goodbye. I have to figure out a way how to get out since there were very few pedicabs and it was already near 5pm. Made my way to the market. There was no opening where a person can squeeze through. Now I know my only way now is to hitch a ride with one of the service vehicles going out. I was in luck that a Multicab was on the way out. They even gave to me the front seat and they wouldn’t want to accept any payment.

Finished my first day in Cebu by going to the Cebu North Bus Terminal to take bus pictures (can’t resist it as it was just on the way). I then went back to Robinson’s Galleria to take my knapsack. It was good Mark tipped me their hospitality service was still free. Soon my son was there to fetch me. Seamless.

I was really able to make full my first day in Cebu. And the extra trip to Ouano was well worth it as me and PSSS discovered what were the changes there.

I just rested next day for I know the next days will be consecutive long trips for me. It turned out to be one complete week of travel that was about 1,900 kilometers long including me and Mark’s trip from Baybay to Tacloban [I have reports on that already except for the Cebu to Tacloban section]. It broke my medical spell of no travel and this first-day tour of Cebu was the first part of it.

Advertisements

The Sister Ships Starlite Jupiter and Lite Ferry 11

When I first saw a photo of Starlite Jupiter of Starlite Ferries in Batangas Bay that was uploaded in the Philippine Ship Spotters Society (PSSS) photostream, I immediately knew she was a Honda ship. There is the same tough-looking stance, the sharp-edged front and the tall bridge I noticed in the other Honda ships. Later, I began to realize she looked the same as a ferry in Cebu, the Lite Ferry 11 of Lite Shipping Corporation which was better-known as Lite Ferries. When I checked in Miramar Ship Index, yes, they were true sister ships but the Lite Ferry 11 was built two years earlier than Starlite Jupiter and they came from the same shipping company in Japan. Yes, that is the beauty of international maritime databases and of the IMO Numbers – authoritative checking is easier. No guessing, no speculation. Now if only MARINA, the local maritime regulatory agency knows how to use IMO Numbers. No they don’t; they will insist on their own registry numbers which is not searchable anywhere else and the international maritime databases have no idea of its existence or use.

14653131695_94f77bc2fe_z

Photo by Jefferson Provido

Starlite Jupiter was first known as the Ferry Misaki No.38 of the Oishi Kaiun (or the O.K. Line) of Japan and her date of build (DOB) is 1989. Meanwhile, Lite Ferry 11 was first known as the Ferry Misaki No.5 of Oishi Kaiun, too and her date of build was 1987. Both were built by the Honda Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. in Saiki yard, Japan. Originally the company was known as the Higashi-Kyushu Zosen Co. Ltd. Saiki Works and was founded in 1943. The company is now known as the Honda Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. With such beginnings I assume this is a different company from the world-famous Honda Motor Co. Ltd. which was founded by the great engineer Soichiro Honda in 1948 and whose description of products does not include ships.

30501654272_5d4f617cb6_z

Ferry Misaki No.5 was the first to arrive in the Philippines in 2010 and she was refitted not in a shipyard but in Ouano wharf in Mandaue, Cebu, a cheap refitting place where charges are practically just the docking fees and sub-contractors like Eliezer Shipworks and Industrial Services will come and do specific steel and other works complete with their own generators for power since Ouano does not provide electricity. This is the reason why Ouano wharf is a favorite of Cebu overnight ferry companies for drydocking (its actually “afloat ship repair” or ASR) and refitting. Well, even Cebu Ferries Corporation used Ouano then along with Lite Ferries, Trans-Asia Shipping Line, Cokaliong Shipping Lines, Medallion Transport, George & Peter Lines and others.

8748026503_5ca1778f86_z

Ouano wharf

In Ouano, from a Cargo RORO ship, Ferry Misaki No. 5 was converted into an overnight ferry with two class accommodations – Tourist and Economy over two passenger decks, both of which are below the bridge or navigation deck. With such arrangement Lite Ferries did not bother to extend anymore the pilot house side to side since visibility is good already (however, many think, it gave Lite Ferry 11 some kind of a funny look). However, the look from the sides might fool some to think she has three passenger decks. Her roof on the top passenger deck is not full so there is a small poop deck.

Officially, Lite Ferry 11 has a passenger capacity of 800 but her general arrangement plan (GAP) shows only 492 and about 170 of that are in fiberglass seats, the infamous “cruel” seats that is a Lite Ferries and Roble Shipping staple which a crude offering for a 6-hour Camotes Sea night crossing (as if one can sleep in that). I have long wondered why they can’t offer seats even as good as ordinary bus seats which has cushioning and headrests. And mind you, the fare for that is just a few pesos less than that of a bunk.

8574497789_c4030482f8_z

Lite Ferry 11 has a narrow stern ramp (the only cargo ramp) and two passenger ramps on each of that seems to be too prominent. The cargo ramp is not the three-piece kind but adequate in most cases. The car deck meanwhile has three lanes and with a length between perpendiculars of 60.0 meters it can be surmised she has about 165 lane-meters in rolling cargo capacity. She typically carries a mix of trucks and lighter vehicles in her Cebu-Ormoc route.

Meanwhile, Ferry Misaki No. 38 arrived in Batangas in 2013 and was refitted into a short-distance ferry-RORO and just equipped with just seats and benches and that can be uncomfortable if the ship is used in the four-hour Roxas-Caticlan route crossing Tablas Strait. Starlite Jupiter had a minimum of modifications and the old Japan passenger section which has airconditioning became the Tourist section and it is equipped with seats that look like bus seats but in longer rows. There is a makeshift deck at the bridge level that houses the Economy section of the ship (which looks hot on a sunny day). It is equipped with cheap plastic benches. There is no passenger accommodation behind the funnel hence the passenger capacity of the ship is small at only 276 passengers. The deck behind the funnels has no roofing.

Starlite Jupiter (Economy Section)

Photo by Raymond Lapus

With such minimal redesign, Starlite Jupiter still looks like a Cargo RORO ship. This is not a ferry that can take in a lot of buses, however, since MARINA rules forbid passengers staying in the bus during the voyage. Reason? There are no lifejackets in the bus. Starlite Ferries tried to extend the pilot house but it also looked makeshift too and the net effect on the eyes is not impressive. Starlite Jupiter is the speedier of the sister ships at 15 knots since she has 2,000 horsepower from 2 Niigata diesels (while Lite Ferry 11 has only 1,500 horsepower from two Niigata engines and just capable of 13.5 knots). The sides of Starlite Jupiter looks high because there are no windows.

29964510932_1bf428a97d_z

Now, I just wonder what is the reason why the international maritime databases confuse Lite Ferry 11 and Lite Ferry 12 of Lite Ferries. They think Lite Ferry 11 is Lite Ferry 12 and vice-versa. Did Lite Ferries swap the AIS? But Lite Ferry 12 is not in the international maritime databases and in fact I can’t find her IMO Number.

Other specifications of Lite Ferry 11:

IMO 8618499, built 1987 by Honda in Saiki, Japan

Bulbous stem, transom stern

65.7m x 15.0m x 3.5m

Japan GT=498, Philippine GT=249, DWT=174

*one of the ships “shrunk” by the MARINA “magic meter”

Lite Ferry 11

Other specifications of Starlite Jupiter:

IMO 8822076, built 1989 by Honda in Sasebo, Japan

Bulbous stem, transom stern

65.1m x 12.0m x 4.6m

Japan GT=441, DWT=216

Starlite Jupiter has a Mindoro route while Lite Ferry 11 is a Cebu-Ormoc ship. Hence, the sister ships do not meet. Both sail at night and both are still reliable.

Good acquisitions for both companies!

The Second Lite Ferry 10

I call this ship the second Lite Ferry 10 because there was an earlier one to bear that name in Lite Shipping Corporation which is more commonly known as Lite Ferries. The first Lite Ferry 10 was a small double-ended RORO which was used in the Cebu-Tubigon route. She was the former Ferry Ezaki No. 11 of the Ezaki Land and Sea Transport of Japan and she came to Lite Ferries in 2009. Subsequently, this ship was sold to Medallion Transport Inc. where she became the Lady of Miraculous Medal and used in the Masbate-Pio Duran, Albay route. Maybe she was sold by Lite Ferries because her passenger capacity is limited and maybe also because Ocean King I became available and was more fit for the needs of Lite Ferries.

The second Lite Ferry 10 was the former Ocean King I of Seamarine Transport Inc., a new Cebu shipping operator then. This was a new company started only in 2009 and they were only able to acquire two ships for their fleet. As a new company in the Camotes Sea/Bohol Strait area that was a little crowded, the company was not able to stabilize a route. Among the other routes they tried was the Liloan-Lipata route which was also crowded especially since there is a competing parallel route, the Benit-Lipata route held by Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. or MSLI. The first RORO ship they tried in this route was their Ocean King II. However, in a few months of sailing, that ship met an accident and capsized (but not sunk) in Benit port. To hold on to the route and since she has no other good route, Seamarine Transport Inc. transferred Ocean King I to the Liloan-Lipata route.

Built as an overnight ship and much bigger than Ocean King II, Ocean King I was a little of an anomaly in that route which has the characteristics of the short-distance ferry route although ferries run even at night. But some tired passengers actually appreciated her because she has an airconditioned Tourist section with bunks aside from also having bunks in Economy. The only problem was the 3-hour cruising time was not really enough to enjoy those accommodations or to wake up really refreshed after being already more than 24 hours on the road. The only other complaint was that the airconditioned accommodation was too cold. She was the only overnight ferry in that route connecting Leyte and Surigao.

Aside from the bunks, there is one feature that truckers and bus drivers appreciated in her that was not present in the other ships sailing to Lipata, whether from Liloan or Benit. Ocean King I was equipped with three-piece hydraulic ramps. So whatever the situation of the tide the vehicles have no problem loading or unloading. And besides having a three-piece hydraulic ramp means the ship moves less when the swells are active.

She was then holding the morning route from Liloan to Lipata and she goes back to that same port from Lipata in the afternoon and she will have a night lay-over in Liloan port. Her Economy fare was P300 but I can’t understand why people balk at the P400 Tourist fare. Maybe that was a little high compared to Camotes Sea routes if the distances are factored in (36 nautical miles versus an average of 55 nautical miles in the Cebu-Leyte routes and the most a Tourist fare there will be P500 and there are Economy fares that are only P300). But fares are really high in the eastern seaboard because they make the passengers pay unwittingly the cost of the discounts they give to the buses and the trucks which regularly cross (the suki). Ocean King I, however, had the disadvantage then that its Economy section is hot because the superstructure fully encompasses the ship. That superstructure was an inheritance from her design in Japan.

Ocean King I and Lite Ferry 10 was known as the Ferry Yamato in Japan and she was owned and operated by the Kochi Sea Line. This ship was built in Japan by Miura Shipbuilding Company in their Miura shipyard in 1987. She then measured 63.0 meters by 12.0 meters with a Gross Tonnage (GT) of 1,020 nominal tons and a loading capacity of 423 tons which was measured in Deadweight Tonnage (DWT). She was equipped with two Niigata marine diesels with a total of 3,200 horsepower shafted to two propellers and her original sustained top speed was 16 knots. She had a unique design. Being thin, she look long and not only that. Her superstructure in the forward stern section were very low but she has a very high bridge. She does not look like the ordinary ship from Japan.

She was refitted and converted in Ouano wharf in Mandaue. An additional deck was built and after that she already look more like a regular ship. However, her bridge still stood out. The front added section became the Tourist section of the ship. The rear of that held the Economy section and in between the two is a very small kiosk which also masqueraded as the “front desk”. She still looked sleek with her long and sharp bow. Passenger walkways were added on each side of the ship but still there is a very long passenger ramp at the stern.

She was actually already a beautiful ship especially with her raked funnels. She had a declared passenger capacity of 452 persons and her Net Tonnage (NT) rose to 679 nominal tons. However, her declared length her rose to 72.0 meters. Now, even though her superstructure gained in size her Gross Tonnage remained at 1,020 nominal tons. Of course this is a concession from MARINA, the local maritime regular for maybe “considerations”. And so the “magic meter” was applied. However with the added weight and the engines not that healthy anymore, all she can do locally was 13 knots maximum.

After two years in the Liloan-Lipata route she was pulled out. Maybe she was not earning especially since her engines are a little big. Her schedules were not really favorable too. A mid-morning departure from Liloan means most vehicle from afar have not yet reached Liloan. And a 1pm departure from Lipata means too that most vehicles crossing the Surigao Strait have not yet reached Lipata. While her car deck is bigger than most in the route, many of the trucks and buses crossing Surigao Strait was already contracted by the other ferries in the route. It is a suki-suki system with with the suki held by heavy discounts.

Like the Bachelor bus pays only P800 then when the advertised rate is P8,000. This is so because, rightly or wrongly, the passengers still pay for the ferry fare and that can be more than P8,000 worth. This is the system in almost any short-distance route that loads buses – they charge the buses low since the passengers still pay. Actually the buses don’t really pay anything because the bus ticket fare actually has hidden charges which I found out because I can computer the fare by the kilometers. That means they charge additional fare when the ferry was actually not running land kilometers because it is crossing the sea. Philtranco also does this and they gave me another ticket when I protested. But as they defended, “You don’t have to carry your baggage anymore”.

Ocean King I then tried some Cebu-Leyte and some Cebu-Bohol routes. We suggested to the Captain a Cebu-Palompon route (this was before Medallion Transport discovered this route; as a note, she withdrew too early in Liloan-Lipata route; in not a long time there was already long queues of trucks there). Then Lite Ferries chartered her for the Cebu-Tagbilaran route. Later, the arrangement went into a direct sale and she became the second Lite Ferry 10. As Lite Ferry 10, her route extends now up to Siquijor and Plaridel in Misamis Occidental.

Not long after acquiring her, Lite Ferries brought her in Tayud, Cebu for another conversion and refitting. Two passenger deck were added to her and her tall bridge deck now has a passenger deck. Her superstructure was cut and more “windows” appeared on her superstructure and those were slanted in a beautiful way and so now she looks sleekier. With that her Economy section is no longer as stuffy.

Her Gross Tonnage should have come up with an additional deck. But her Gross Tonnage actually went down to 999. Her Net Tonnage is now 679 nominal tons. Her length went back 63.6 meters with a depth of 4.0meters. With those changes her passenger capacity which should be over 700 persons by now. Maybe Lite Ferries also did those alterations so she will have a Cabin class that was not available before.

She is probably the most beautiful ship of Lite Ferries as viewed from the outside. She is also one of the biggest. The only one clear-cut bigger than her is Lite Ferry 8 which was once a Negros Navigation liner. Although her Captain as Ocean King I admitted her engines were not that strong anymore, he was really referring to the speed and not to reliability as she is still a a very reliable ship. Engines getting grey and weak is actually not that much of a problem anymore as surplus and brand-new replacement engines are already readily available in the market. In fact in the Lite Ferries fleet, the Lite Ferry 5, the Lite Ferry 8 and the Lite Ferry 20 were recipients of the re-engining treatment.

This is one ferry that will still last long and she is a beauty to watch. She will turn out to be a good buy for Lite Ferries.

The Well-Travelled MV Asia Japan, the Third

The MV Asia Japan, the third to carry such name in the Trans-Asia Shipping Line, Incorporated (TASLI) fleet is the Asia Japan most would likely remember. But she was already the third to carry such name in the Trans-Asia fleet as two previous cruiser ships named Asia Japan came before her in the Trans-Asia fleet Shipping Line. The third Asia Japan I am describing here is a RORO (Roll-on, Roll-off) ship and not a cruiser ship like the first two to carry that name. Her company, the Trans-Asia Shipping Line, Incorporated is a regional shipping company based in Cebu that is sailing Visayas-Mindanao routes.

The first Asia Japan was the former Ishu Maru from Kyushu Yusen of Japan with the IMO Number 5164459. She was built in 1957 and she came to the Trans-Asia Shipping fleet in 1975. This ship was later sold to Roble Shipping Incorporated where she became the second Guada Cristy of that company. The second Asia Japan, meanwhile, was the former Nankai Maru from Nankai Kisen of Japan with the IMO Number 7130191. She was built in 1956 and she came to the Trans-Asia Shipping fleet in 1974 where she was first known as the Solar before she became the second Asia Japan (Trans-Asia Shipping Line Incorporated was first known as Solar Shipping Line Incorporated). This ship was later sold also to Roble Shipping Incorporated where she became the first Guada Cristy. She was wrecked in 1990, the reason why there became a second Guada Cristy.

The second Asia Japan was sold by Trans-Asia Shipping Line Incorporated in 1988 when the third Asia Japan was purchased by the company from Ise Bay Ferry or Ise-wan Ferry. This Japanese company sold this ship, their Atsumi Maru because their brand-new Atsumi Maru was already delivered to them. Incidentally, this successor Atsumi Maru also came to the Philippines in 2007 to the fleet of Montenegro Shipping Lines Incorporated (MSLI) where she is known as the Maria Oliva.

The earlier Atsumi Maru was built by Naikai Zosen Taguma Works in Taguma, Innoshima, Japan in 1973. She is steel-hulled ship with a raked stem and a transom stern, two masts and a single passenger deck. A RORO ship, she has a bow ramp and a stern ramp and a single car deck. She has an over-all length of 64.0 meters, a length between perpendiculars of 60.3 meters and a maximum breadth of 13.1 meters. Her original Gross Register Tons (GRT) was 990 and her Deadweight Tonnage (DWT)was 403 tons. She is equipped with 2 x 2,000hp Daihatsu engines which propelled her to 16 knots on two screws. In the Philippines, her probable sister ships are the late Starlite Voyager of Starlite Ferries Incorporated (though their bows are different) and the Reina Timotea of Marina Ferries, the legal-fiction sister company of Montenegro Shipping Lines Incorporated.

When Atsumi Maru arrived in the Philippines in 1988 to become the third Asia Japan, another deck was added to her to increase the passenger capacity. She was also converted into an overnight ferry with bunks. With that, her Gross Tonnage rose to 1,302 with a Net Tonnage of 359 and her Deadweight Tonnage also increased to 443 tons. Her new passenger capacity was 454 persons in a three-class configuration – Cabin, Tourist and open-air Economy. She had a good restaurant, a bar-lounge, a lobby and a front desk. This Asia Japan already had a Hotel Department aside from the Deck Department and Engine Department, one of the first regional ships to have such distinction. Maybe that has a connection to its first route Zamboanga which I will discuss later. For easier docking this ship is also already equipped with side thrusters at the bow. She also had a cargo ramp at the port side and two passenger ramps at the stern and another ramp at the port side.

Her first route was the Cebu-Dumaguete-Dipolog-Zamboanga route. This was still the time when big Cebu regional shipping companies Trans-Asia Shipping Lines, George & Peter Lines and the Zamboanga-based Aleson Shipping Lines were still giving much importance to the Cebu-Zamboanga connection via Dumaguete (this was later downgraded by the opening of the Dapitan-Dumaguete RORO connection). It was amazing then that a new ship like the third Asia Japan will be fielded to this route when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was still using their older overnight ferry-cruisers in the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route which was the premier Visayas-Mindanao route.

Later, the third Asia Japan was also fielded in the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route when Trans-Asia Shipping Lines began selling their old overnight cruisers in the early 1990’s. But with the arrival of the new and bigger RORO series of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines – the Trans-Asia (1) in 1993, the Asia Philippines in 1994 and the Asia China in 1995, Asia Japan was relegated to the secondary routes of the company like Cebu-Iloilo. Very soon the Visayas-Mindanao overnight ferry wars which was started with the creation of the big Cebu Ferries Company started and Trans-Asia Shipping Lines had to reserve her best and biggest ferries to the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro premier route. This was also marked by the withdrawal of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines in the Cebu-Zamboanga route and just sticking to cargo there with the Asia Pacific. The coming of the more superior Lady Mary Joy (1) of Aleson Shipping Lines practically closed the door to them in Zamboanga (this Aleson ship is different from the current Lady Mary Joy 1 of the company). Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was immediately under siege by the much bigger Cebu Ferries Corporation as they bore the brunt of the offensive of that subsidiary of the giant William, Gothong & Aboitiz (WG&A) shipping line.

The third Asia Japan sailed many secondary routes for Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. Before the end of the old millennium the assignments of the fleet got quaky with the losses of the Asia South Korea (grounding and sinking) and Asia Thailand (fire) with no clear replacement. Not long after, this the RORO Asia Singapore, the Second, was also sold to F.J. Palacio Lines. Later, the third Asia Japan was assigned to the Cebu-Masbate route of the company. She was a big success there as that route of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was practically a monopoly. And Masbatenos were not disappointed at her appointments especially since she was a former Cebu-Zamboanga ferry, a route which takes about a day with its two stop-overs. In routes such as this, the passengers’ comfort and sustenance needs are greater than that of a simple overnight ferry.

Once, I booked a ticket from Cebu to Cagayan de Oro hoping to catch either the Trans-Asia (1) or Asia China. Lo and behold, when I reached the waterfront what I saw waiting for us was the Asia Japan. I actually grumbled and said we are entitled to a discount as our fare was supposedly on that superior-than-her sister ships. I can accept the third Asia Japan as a Cebu-Masbate ferry as there was none better than her in that route (her reliever Asia Brunei was just as good) but the Cebu-Cagayan route is littered with superior overnight ferries that was at or near the level of Manila liners like the Princess of the Ocean, the Our Lady of Good Voyage, the Our Lady of the Rule and the Dona Rita Sr.

I was disappointed. The aircon was not strong and the restaurant was no longer as good as before. Maybe her best Hotel Department crewmen were already assigned to the better overnight ferries of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. And then I was furious that when I woke up we were still just at the entrance of Macalajar Bay and still distant from Cagayan de Oro. Other passengers were already impatient and I even saw one flash the pumping arm sign to the bridge which is a universal sign of “Hurry up!”. Passengers in this route were used to daybreak or even dawn arrivals which were needed by passengers still travelling 300 land kilometers or over by buses or commuter vans like me.

Soon, some were groaning they were already hungry. I was, too. I know that by MARINA rules they should have fed us breakfast but there was no decent breakfast to speak of even if one was willing to pay. It was a personal disaster to me as I was a diabetic. We finally reached Cagayan de Oro port and to a man I know all were disappointed. They should never have substituted Asia Japan in that route because it will just be a disaster for the goodwill and reputation of the company like what happened. I asked of the speed and a crewman grimly admitted she can just do 10 knots then, best. Use that in a 134-nautical mile route with a departure of 8PM and no breakfast; it does not need coconuts to foresee the consequences. I thought they should just better stick Asia Japan to the 110-nautical mile Cebu-Masbate route where the expectations of the passengers is not so high. In an afterthought, yes, I also realized she has been sailing for nearly nearly twenty years already and it seems time has not been very kind to her engines.

Not very long after that Asia Japan was seen by members of the Philippine Ship Spotters Society (PSSS) to be just laid up in the Ouano wharf in Mandaue, tied up. It was intriguing the members especially since the fleet of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines was very thin for its routes. Already gone were the Asia Brunei, Asia Hongkong which were both sold and soon Asia Malaysia was gone, too (she capsized and sank off Iloilo). And there was the third Asia Japan just lying around there. That time, Trans-Asia Shipping Lines cannot even serve her Nasipit route and just a single ship from two was serving her Iloilo route.

Once, on a visit to Ouano wharf, we were able to ask the in-charge of the ship her state. He told us third Asia Japan was sold by Trans-Asia Shipping Line to Key West Shipping Line Corporation which were operators of tugboats and partner then in the West Ocean Lines & Transport Incorporated operating container ships. We saw some works being done and the in-charge told us the ship will be used for a Cebu-Zamboanga run. That was intriguing as she was a former Cebu-Zamboanga ship and neither Key West Shipping Line Corporation nor West Ocean Lines & Transport Incorporated have operated ferries before. I am not even sure if they were holders of a franchise (CPC) in that route but in case it will be a welcome development since there was just one ferry left in the Cebu-Zamboanga route, the Zamboanga Ferry of George & Peter Lines and she was already very slow then.

Soon the little works we observed in Ouano wharf stopped and the next thing we knew was she was already in Nagasaka Shipyard in the shipyard row of Cebu in Tayud by the Cansaga Bay and bridge. We thought then further works will done there especially since the in-charge in Ouano admitted to us that the third Asia Japan doesn’t have strong engines anymore. Then me and a fellow ship spotter were able to board the ship and meet her new officer-in-charge, Engr. Rey Bobiles, the naval architect of Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation, a Bicol shipping company. It was a surprise and a further intrigue!

Yes, the third Asia Japan was renamed into Strong Heart 1, a show she was really transferred to the Key West Shipping Line Corporation as all the names of the vessels of the company starts with “Strong” like Strong Will, Strong Devotion, Strong Desire, Strong Dignity, Strong Bliss, etc. No, she will no longer be sailing for Zamboanga as she has already been sold to Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation and will become a Bicol ferry. It turned out that Trans-Asia Shipping Line sold her to Key West Shipping Line Corporation to settle fuel debts dacion en pago. I suddenly realized the connection. Trans-Asia Shipping Line was also intending to sell Trans-Asia 3 because “she consumes too much fuel”. It seemed believable at first glance because she has 2 x 4,500 horsepower engines. Then an investigation with the proper authorities commenced and it turned out Trans-Asia Shipping Line was simply a victim of a fuel scam as in fuel pilferage, a scourge of our local transport fleet. It happens even in the tankers, in the fishing fleets, in land tankers and in trucks.

Strong Heart 1 stayed very long in Nagasaka Shipyard with few works being done. She simply became the office of Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation and clearing house for the new crew recruits of the company and dormitory at the same time. She can stay in the shipyard long because Sta. Clara Shipping Company and her sister company Penafrancia Shipping Corporation are stockholders in Nagasaka Shipyard. Actually, vessels of the companies were withdrawn from the servicing of Mayon Docks Incorporated in Tabaco City in Albay and transferred to the care of Nagasaka Shipyard. Bicol ships also owned by the related stockholders of the two companies were also being transferred to the care of Nagasaka Shipyard. Nagasaka Shipyard was the former Villono Shipyard before the change in the ownership structure (Engr. David Villono, the founder is still the head of this shipyard).

While in the shipyard engine parts were ordered fabricated in Japan. When that arrived in 2014, serious restoration work was done on Strong Heart 1 which was already renamed to Nathan Matthew. Since she has lain untended in sea water for several years she was already rusty and when walking around one has to be careful not to fall in the weak deck plates and stairs. It was even raining at times inside some portions of her already. So, she was stripped to metal by sandblasting, her weak hull and deck plates were replaced and her engines were repaired.

A portion of her superstructure in the aft of the second deck was removed too since it was thought her space for passengers as a short-distance ferry will be enough since she will simply be fitted with sitting accommodations. With this, her gross tonnage was reduced to 1,030 nominal tons and her net tonnage was also reduced to 357 nominal tons. Her passenger capacity increased to about 800, however. So the rumor and the wish that she will still be an overnight ferry in the Liloan-Lipata route never materialized. Drivers and passengers in that route wished there will be a replacement of the Ocean King I in that route since when they arrive from Manila or Luzon they are already badly in need of an accommodation where they can lie down and sleep.

Upon finishing works in Nagasaka, the Nathan Matthew was first fielded in the Masbate-Pio Duran, Albay route. I don’t know if they want to tickle the Masbatenos but for sure many there will be many there who will recognize her even if she was already converted to a short-distance ferry, even though the bow ramp has changed and even though they chopped off part of the second passenger deck and even though the name has changed. Even with alterations, I noticed passengers really familiar with a ship still recognize them even after a long absence. Nathan Matthew won’t be an exemption.

She did not stay long there in that route, however. In not a long time she was transferred to the new Liloan, Southern Leyte to Lipata, Surigao route of Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation. The company has long been a holder of a franchise (formally Certificate of Public Convenience) in that route but it is only now that they had a ship that can serve there. Right now, Nathan Matthew is the biggest ship in that route especially since the Archipelago Ferries Philippines Corporation ships (the Maharlika Dos, Maharlika Cuatro and Maharlika Cinco) are already gone in that route.

There, Nathan Matthew is directly competing with the newly-fielded FastCats of Archipelago Philippine Ferries, the obsolescent Millennium Uno of Millennium Shipping and the Cargo RORO LCTs chartered by NN+ATS which is aimed against the truck congestion in that route (also for really heavy load like earth movers and trailers capable of carrying that). However, that route is slowly being squeezed by the shorter Benit, San Ricardo to Lipata route held by Montenegro Shipping Lines Incorporated (MSLI). Now it seems a new port will be built in San Ricardo, S. Leyte and if that will materialize that might be the end of the Liloan-Lipata route.

In won’t mean the end of Nathan Matthew, however, as she might simply be transferred to the new San Ricardo route. Otherwise, she can also be fielded in the other routes of owner Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation (making her more well-travelled). It won’t be much of a burden for them because her owners are known also for having deep pockets, relative by Bicol standards. They are even operating their own port now in Allen, Northern Samar.

Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation is known for taking care well of old ships. They are actually allergic to breakers, to put it in another way. And with the support of Nagasaka Shipyard, this refurbished ship looks like it still has a long way to go. With the Sta. Clara Shipping Corporation officers and crew steeped and trained in the dangerous swells of San Bernardino Strait I don’t see her suffering the fate of the capsized and sank Maharlika Dos in Surigao Strait, knock on wood.

Long live then this well-travelled ship!

Ouano Wharf: A Place For Refittings

Retrieved from the old PSSS Website
written by: Mike Baylon

Whenever news that a vis-min shipping company would buy a new ship, one of the most asked questions is “Where would that ship be refitted?” For an archipelagic country like the Philippines, sea travel and short inter-island ferry services and trips are the swiftest way of transporting yourself to and from an island. But didn’t you ever how and where are these ships remodelled and refitted?

Ouano Wharf at Day


Ouano Wharf at Night ©Jonathan Bordon

Ouano Wharf Located at Mandaue City in the Island of Cebu is one of the busiest wharf of the country, is known to be the home of new ships bought from other countries like Japan, Korea and China are remodelled.

The history of Ouano Wharf was traced back during the early 70’s and was made into reality by industrialist Ernesto Cabrera Ouano Sr. He was a visionary who started his fortune in business with vast tact of salt beds and later converted the area into an “Industrialized Zone” making it one of the most busiest wharfs in Cebu. Along the piece of land is the ancestral house of the Ouanos. The Ouanos also owns a yacht that would carry the replica of the Holy Infant Jesus or better known as the Sto. Niño de Cebu during the yearly fluvial procession.

Busy Ouano Wharf ©Mark Ocul

Cebu, being the centre of the shipping industry of the Philippines, has the most number of inter-island shipping companies where their fleet would range from 40-100 meter ships and some of these companies operate a wide range of routes where there’s a need for a better and a faster ship.

Japan is one of the main sources of 2nd hand ships that are now being used by most of the local shipping companies in their operations. A delivery of a ship from Japan to the Philippines would last 5-7 days, depending on the route being used and on the speed of the ship. Most of the companies here in Cebu like Lite Shipping, Cokaliong Shipping Lines, Gothong Southern, Trans Asia Shipping Lines Inc., and Cebu Ferries Corporation would have their newly acquired 2nd hand ship remodelled and refitted in Ouano Wharf. Probably, the rental of the place is much cheaper than a regular shipyard, and accessibility to the main road is just 300 meters away.

One of the common things you will notice in Ouano wharf is that any shipping company can dock there and would probably have their ships repaired and remodelled there. The shipping company will also hire their own security guard to ensure peace and order on their ships. The company is also the one who will choose their own contractor and bring their own equipments, have their own power source by the use of generators and have the ship design by the Naval Architect hired by the owner.

Ouano Wharf Aerial View ©Raymond Lapus

Most of the ships that are bought from Japan are mostly for rolling cargoes and there is just a small passenger deck attached on the ship. Most of them too, has a bow ramp which is usually used when docking while they are still used by their own individual operators in Japan.

Take for instance, the Big Three of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated: MV Filipinas Cebu, MV Filipinas Ozamis, MV Filipinas Iligan. They all had a bow ramp in Japan and there was just a little space on a deck where passengers could stay. When they acquired their ships, they immediately had it dock in Ouano Wharf and had their new closed bow attached their. In addition, supplementary decks were also added in order for the ship to cater the demands of passenger accommodations. Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated hired their own contractor.

Another good example is the Big Three of the Cebu Ferries Corporation. The MV Cebu Ferry 1, MV Cebu Ferry 2 and MV Cebu Ferry 3. They were all refitted in Ouano wharf when the company acquired them. The 3 decks of MV Cebu Ferry 2 and MV Cebu Ferry 3 were just added when they were being refitted their. On the original design, these 2 ships are just mostly used for rolling cargo and there were basically no room for passenger accommodations.

Cebu Ferry 2 reffited at Ouano Wharf

Filipinas Ozamis reffited at Ouano Wharf ©Vincent Paul Sanchez

The examples mentioned above are very good examples why most of the vis-min shipping companies would choose Ouano wharf as a place where they can refit their ships. There is freedom for the company to choose things that will be done to the ship in order for it to look good and be loved by the riding public.

These are some of the ships that were recently refitted in Ouano when a company acquired them:

Lite Shipping Corporation
MV Lite Ferry 8 (ex-Sta. Maria of Negros Navigation, ex-GP Ferry 1 of G&P Lines, built in Japan)
MV Lite Ferry 9 (ex-Daian 8, built and acquired in Japan)
MV Lite Ferry 10 (ex-Ferry Ezaki, built and acquired in Japan)
MV Lite Ferry 11 (built and acquired from Japan)
MV Lite Ferry 15 (built and acquired from Japan)
MV Lite Ferry 23 (ex-Ferry Misaki, built and acquired from Japan)

Trans Asia Shipping Lines Inc
MV Trans Asia 3 (ex-New Shikoku, built and acquired in Japan)
MV Trans Asia 5 (ex-Butuan Bay 1of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc, built and acquired from Japan)

Cebu Ferries Corporation
MV Cebu Ferry 1 (ex-Ferry Kumano, built and acquired from Japan)
MV Cebu Ferry 2 (ex-Asakaze, built and acquired from Japan)
MV Cebu Ferry 3 (ex-Esan, built and acquired from Japan)

Cokaliong Shipping Lines
MV Filipinas Dinagat (ex-Soya Maru, built and acquired from Japan)
MV Filipinas Iligan (ex-Ferry Fukue, built and acquired from Japan)
MV Filipinas Cebu (ex-Mikawa Maru, built and acquired from Japan)
MV Filipinas Ozamis (ex-Suruga, built and acquired from Japan)

Negros Navigation
MV St. Michael the Archangel (ex-Blue Diamond, ex-Queen Mary, acquired from Korea, built in Japan)

Ouano Wharf isn’t just a normal place where ships are being refitted. There are also Motorbancas and LCTs who are plying some short distance routes. MB Ave Maria 5, a Motorbanca, is doing a Ouano(Cebu)-Poro, Camotes-Ormoc route and LCT Sta. Filomena and LCT Sto. Niño de Bohol is doing a Ouano(Cebu)-Tubigon, Bohol route.

Basically, there are more ships that were refitted in Ouano during the past, probably. But no matter what happens to the shipping industry, may it rise or fall, one thing will always be in the minds of Ship Spotters – Ouano Wharf is a part and will always be a part of the history of the shipping industry in the vis-min region of the Philippines.