The Fast Cruiser Liners of the Other Shipping Companies Aside From William Lines and Sulpicio Lines

If we adjust the standards a little for fast cruisers in the 1950’s at just below 18 knots then the first “Don Julio” of Ledesma Shipping Lines will qualify a fast cruiser liner. It should be because she was actually the fastest liner of her era! She was the fastest liner of the 1950’s when she was fielded in 1951 and that was true until she was sold to Southern Lines in 1959.

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Credits to Manila Chronicle and Gorio Belen

The first “Don Julio” was an ex-”FS” ship but lengthened in Hongkong when converted to a passenger-cargo ship like many of her sister ships here. She was the fastest in her period because she was re-engined to higher ratings. Two former diesel engines from submarines which were Fairbanks-Morse diesels of a combined 3,600 horsepower were fitted to her and this gave her a speed of over 17 knots. She was the former “FS-286” built by Wheeler Shipbuilding Corp. in Brookly, Newy York USA. As lengthened her dimensions were 66.2 meters by 10.0 meters with a cubic measure of 1,051 gross register tons and she was the biggest former ex-”FS” ship that sailed in the country. Later, when she passed on to Philippine Pioneer Lines she was known as “Pioneer Leyte”. On October 23, 1966, she was involved in a collision in Manila Bay and she was subsequently broken up.

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Credits to Philippine Herald and Gorio Belen

The next fastest liner in Philippine waters came in 1960. She was formerly a seaplane tender named “Onslow” and built for the US Navy by Lake Washington Shipyard in Houghton, Washington, USA in 1943. Continuing service in the US Navy after the war she was known as “AVP-48”, a supply ship. Released from the US Navy, she was converted as a passenger-cargo ship. She measured 94.7 meters by 12.5 meters with a cubic volume of 2,137. This ship has two engines of 6,080 horsepower giving her a top speed of 18 knots. She was first known as “President Quezon” in the fleet of Philippine President Lines and later she was known as “Quezon”. When she was transferred to the fleet of Philippine Pioneer Lines she was known as “Pioneer Iloilo” and when she was sold to Galaxy Lines she became the flagship of the fleet by the name of “Galaxy”. She foundered at her moorings in Cebu while laid up on October 19, 1971.

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Credits to Evening News and Gorio Belen

In 1968, the leading company then Compania Maritima ordered the liner “Filipinas” from Bremer Vulkan AG in Vegesack, Germany. This flagship has the dimensions 121.0 meters by 18.1 meters and her cubic measurement was 4,997 gross tons. She had a single Bremer Vulkan diesel engine of 8,800 horsepower which gave her a top speed of 18 knots. As a fast and modern cruiser liner, she was used by the company in the long-distance route to Davao via Cebu and Zamboanga, a very logical route for her. She served the company until Compania Maritima ceased sailing and she was sent to Taiwan ship breaker. She was demolished on April 5, 1985 after just 17 years of sailing. She was probably not purchased by other companies here because during that time it was already obvious that the period of the ROROs has arrived and she was a cruiser.

In 1970, Compania Maritima acquired another cruiser liner, a second-hand one, the former “Hornkoog” of Horn-Linie GmbH. This ship was built by Deutsche Werft AG in Finkenwerder, Hamburg, Germany in 1959. She was renamed here as the second “Mindanao” and she was actually longer but thinner than the flagship “Filipinas” at 134.6 meters by 16.1 meters. She had the cubic volume 3,357 gross register tons. This liner was powered by a single diesel engine which gave her a top speed of 18 knots. It seems this fast cruiser liner was mainly used by Compania Maritima in their Far East routes where their name was Maritime Company of the Philippines. Incidentally, this ship was the last-ever liner acquired by Compania Maritima. This ship was broken up in Taiwan in 1980.

After the first “Don Julio” from Ledesma Shipping Lines, the coalesced company of Ledesma Lines and Negros Navigation, with the latter as survivor, embarked on a series of orders of new fast cruiser liners which were actually all sister ships. This started with the “Dona Florentina” in 1965. She was built by Hitachi Zosen Corp. in Osaka, Japan and she measured 95.7 meters by 13.9 meters. This liner had a cubic measurement of 2,095 gross register tons and a passenger capacity of 831. She was fitted with a single Hitachi diesel engine with 4,400 horsepower and she had a top speed of 17.5 knots. Since this was still the 1960’s and it was just a shade under 18 knots I already qualify her as a fast cruiser liner. She had a fire while sailing on May 18, 1983 and she was beached on Batbatan Island in Culasi, Antique. She was later towed to Batangas where she was broken up on March 1985.

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Credits to Gorio Belen

The beautiful “Don Julio” followed “Dona Florentina” in 1967 and she became the flagship of the Negros Navigation fleet. She was built in Maizuru Shipyard in Maizuru, Japan and she had the same length and breadth of “Dona Florentina”. She was however a little bigger at 2,381 gross tons and she had a higher passenger capacity at 994. She had the same engine and the same horsepower as “Dona Florentina” and her speed was the same, too. This liner had a long career and she even became part of the transfer of Negros Navigation ships to Jensen Shipping of Cebu. She had her final lay-up sometime ins 2000’s and now her fate is uncertain. Her namesake congressman was however still looking for her several years ago, for preservation purposes. Most likely she is gone now.

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Credits to Times Journal and Gorio Belen

In 1971, Negros Navigation rolled out a new flagship, a sister ship to “Dona Florentina” and “Don Julio” but with a bigger engine and a higher top speed. This was the “Don Juan” with the same length and breadth as the two but fitted with 5,000-horsepower B&W engine which gave her a top speed of 19 knots. Her cubic measure was 2,310 gross register tons and she had a passenger capacity of only 740 because she had more amenities. She was built by Niigata Shipbuilding & Repair in Niigata, Japan. This fast cruiser liner did not sail long because on the night of April 22, 1980, she was hit by tanker “Tacloban City” on her port side while cruising in Tablas Strait at night. She went down quickly with a claimed 1,000 number of lives lost. She was reckoned to be overloaded at that time.

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Credits to Times Journal and Gorio Belen

In 1976, Negros Navigation procured a second-hand fast cruiser liner, the “Don Claudio”. During that time, because of the fast devaluation Philippine shipping companies can no longer afford to acquire new liners. This ship was the former “Okinoshima Maru” of Kansai Kisen KK. She was built in 1966 by Sanoyas Shoji Company in Osaka, Japan. Her dimensions were 92.6 meters by 14.4 meters and her cubic dimensions was 2,721 gross tons. Originally, her passenger capacity was 895. She was equipped with a 3,850-horsepower Mitsui-B&W engine that gave her a top speed of 18.5 knots.

All the fast cruiser liners of Negros Navigation were mainly used in the short routes to Bacolod and Iloilo. Later, some were assigned a route to Roxas City, another short route.

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Credits to Philippinje Herald and Gorio Belen

The last shipping company to have a fast cruiser liner was Sweet Lines. She purchased the “H.P. Prior” from Det Forenede in Denmark in 1970 and when they fielded this they ruled the Manila-Cebu route. She was the legendary and first “Sweet Faith” which later battled in that route the equally-legendary “Cebu City” of William Lines. “Sweet Faith” was built by Helsingor Vaertft in Elsinore, Denmark in 1950. She measured 104.0 meters by 14.9 meters and 3,155 gross register tons as cubic measure. This fast cruiser was equipped by two Helsingor Vaerft diesel engines with a total of 7,620 horsepower which provided her a top speed of 20 knots sustained. She was actually the first liner in the inter-island route capable of 20 knots, a magic threshold. She only sailed for ten years here and in 1980 she was broken up in Cebu.

Sweet Lines had another liner capable of sailing at 18 knots when she was still new. This was the former “Caralis” of Tirrenea Spa di Navale of Italy which was built by Navalmeccanica in Castellamare, Italy. She was the second “Sweet Home” of Sweet Lines and she measured 120.4 meters by 16.0 meters and 5,489 gross register tons in cubic capacity and she can carry 1,200 persons. Sweet Lines advertised her and the “Sweet Faith” as the “Inimitable Pair” and the two were paired in the premier Manila-Cebu route. Sweet Lines sold her in 1978 and she became a floating hotel. She capsized and sank while laid up in Manila on November 24, 1981. She was subsequently broken up.

These were the eight other fast cruiser liners that came to the Philippines which were not part of the fleet of William Lines and Sulpicio Lines in which I had an earlier article.

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The M/S Don Claudio

In 1976, when Negros Navigation Company (Nenaco) felt the need for another liner they bought the “Okinoshima Maru” from Kansai Kisen KK and this became the M/S Don Claudio in their fleet. From a line of four brand-new liners starting with the “Dona Florentina” in 1965 to “Don Julio” in 1967, to “Don Vicente” in 1969 to the “Don Juan” in 1971, Negros Navigation was forced to buy second-hand because of the fast deteriorating value of the peso. This was no disgrace to Negros Navigation since when Martial Law was declared in the Philippines in 1972, no passenger liner shipping company was still able to buy brand-new.

The “Okinoshima Maru” was a cruiser ferry which means she was not a RORO. When she was built in 1966, the age of ROROs has not yet fully bloomed (it will come very soon in the era of the “Bypasses of the Sea” which started in the late 1960’s). Hence, she handled cargo by booms and she had these equipment fore and aft. Later, those cargo booms also handled container vans LOLO (Lift On, Lift Off). However, her early booms were not strong enough for 20-foot container vans. She mainly handled XEUs or the squarish 10-foot container vans. Her front boom had that characteristic A-frame which was rather rare.

The “Okinoshima Maru” was built by Sanoyas Shipbuilding Corporation or Sanoyasu of Japan in their Osaka yard. Her keel was laid in July of 1965 and she was completed in February of 1966. A steel-hulled ship, she had a raked stem and a cruiser stern, the common design combination of that cruiser era. She had two masts and two passenger decks originally. Her top deck superstructure then was mainly for the crew. The ship’s permanent ID was IMO 6603373. In Japan she was classed for open-ocean navigation which means routes to the outside of the four main Japan island and not just to the Inland Sea routes of Japan.

The ship was 92.6 meters in Length Over-all (LOA), a Length Between Perpendiculars (LBP) of 86.4 meters and 14.4 meters in extreme breadth and so her size was more or less equal of the fast cruisers being rolled out then here (except for some former European cruiser liners which have lengths of over 100 meters). Her original Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) was 2,721 tons but this later this rose this rose to 2,863 when scantling for open-air third-class accommodations were added at the top deck. She had a load capacity in Deadweight Tonnage (DWT) of 1,950 tons. The ship’s depth was 8.4 meters which means she was more stable than the other liners of the Negros Navigation fleet. Well, her wider breath also helped in that department.

After internal renovations locally, she can already accommodate 895 passengers in different classes. That was about par with most of the fast cruisers of that era, the 1970’s. Later, her passenger capacity rose to 963 and her Net Register Tonnage (NRT) increased to 1,108 tons. That figure shows her internal revenue-generating space in terms of passengers and cargo. She was powered by a single Mitsui-B&W engine of 3,850 horsepower that was good enough for 18 knots. The company claimed that was still her speed here. This means she can be classified as a fast cruiser here. She was given the call sign DZOC in the Philippines.

In those days, the routes of Negros Navigation from Manila was only Bacolod and Iloilo and so she did those routes together with the other fast cruisers of the company like the “Dona Florentina”, the “Don Julio” and the “Don Juan”. For the two routes which was more or less equidistant, she took 22 hours of sailing. For passenger ingress and egress, she had that famous sliding door at both sides of the ship. It was a contraption that was reassuring when seas are rough. Her superstructure extended to the side of the ship and there are no outside passageways. She then sailed practically trouble-free with no controversy for the next twenty years.

In the middle of the 1990’s, when Negros Navigation began receiving new RORO liners, the “Don Claudio” began serving Roxas City (Culasi port) aside from the routes to Bacolod and Iloilo. When more RORO liners arrived for Negros Navigation, she and fellow cruiser “Don Julio” was assigned the shorter routes to the small ports of northern Panay. Initially, she held the the Manila-Roxas City-Estancia (Iloilo) route. A little later, she also held the Manila-Dumaguit (Aklan)-Roxas City route of “Don Julio” in competition with the bigger “Our Lady of Naju” of WG&A. Incidentally, both were cruisers. And a little later again she pioneered the Manila-Estancia-San Carlos City (Negros Occidental) route.

She was then just sailing at 16 knots which was still somewhat decent (that was just about the speed of “SuperFerry 3”, “Our Lady of Medjugorje” and “Our Lady of Sacred Heart”, the “Zambonga City”, “Tacloban Princess”, “Masbate I” and better than “Maynilad”, “Cebu Princess”, “Surigao Princess” and “Palawan Princess”). Of course she cannot match the newer, faster RORO liners. In her whole career with Negros Navigation, she only held short and medium distance routes which was the equivalent of an interport call of rival shipping companies which means a sailing time of less than a day. San Carlos City was the longest route she held for Negros Navigation.

One night when I was aboard a liner on the way to Mindanao (sorry, I can’t remember the name of the ship now) I was surprised to see her in Dumaguete port. I asked around and found out she was doing or Negros Navigation was trying a Bacolod-Dumaguete-Cagayan de Oro route. I wished then she would succeed as no shipping company tried that route before and it might have been a valid route although Negros Navigation was already doing the Bacolod-Cagayan de Oro route with their liners from Manila. That shunting to minor routes was the fate then of the old cruiser liners of Negros Navigation. It seemed they had nowhere to go and nobody would still buy cruisers then except for the ship breakers.

She, together with “Don Julio” and not-so-reliable-anymore “Santa Ana” (later renamed “Super Shuttle Ferry 8”) was transferred to Jensen Shipping Corporation which was an attempt to try to fit former liners into extended overnight routes. It was with this company that she was tried on a Cebu-Bacolod-Iloilo-Puerto Princesa route. Well, this route looks like a liner route to me with its distance and many ports of call. I liked it then when shipping companies will still try to find a route somehow for their old ferries (and that is a reason I have a dislike for one particular shipping company which mastered in the early selling ships to the breakers).

I cannot gather exactly when “Don Claudio” stopped sailing. A database said she was laid up in 2009 but I think it might have happened earlier than that. There was even a report she was broken up as early as 2003. She is no longer in the MARINA database and nor is Jensen Shipping Corporation reflected to still have ships or operating. In almost all likelihood, she is already in shipping heaven.

 

 

[Photo Credit: Ray Smith                                                                                                                                 [Research Support: Gorio Belen]                                                                                                                   [Database Support: Jun Marquez/Mike Baylon/PSSS]