Maasin Port Is An “Anomaly” And So Is The City

Maasin City as a provincial capital of Southern Leyte is an ”anomaly” but this is in no way meant to insult it and its people. But there is no other provincial capital in the country where the capital is the last and furthermost locality. And that becomes a problem for the people of its towns on the other end like San Ricardo and Silago. They would have to spend several hours on the road just to reach their capital should they need a transaction there. And funny, to reach Maasin faster, even public vehicles go back through Bato in the neighboring  Leyte province to take the mountain road that starts at Bontoc town because it is shorter and travel time is faster. Going back, many take the same road too.

Donna Simon

Maasin port by Donna Simon

Maasin port became an anomaly too because of that road. Ferries from Cebu would rather dock in Bato or Hilongos port in Leyte rather than Maasin port and its vehicles and the shuttles (called “boat service” when the ferries are not boats) will also take the Bato to Bontoc road. But the national government through the Philippine Ports Authority (PPA) will always give priority to Maasin port because it has the designation as a provincial port even though the de-facto ports of entry now of Southern Leyte are the Hilongos and Bato ports in Leyte province.

Those two mentioned ports were so deadly especially with an extension like shuttle buses for passengers and a shortcut to Bontoc via Bato. The two killed the overnight ferries to Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian (or San Juan) especially those of ill-fated Maypalad Shipping (pun intended). Those ports have no chance as their ferries arrive near noon while ferries In Hilongos and Bato aided by shuttle buses can deliver passengers in those towns before breakfast. And the over-all fare is even lower because land fares are much cheaper than sea fares. Moreover, going to Cebu they would have just to wait for the shuttles instead of taking a local commute to the port and no transfers are needed.

Even Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. (CSLI) which has been loyally serving Maasin port (it was a bread and butter of the company in its earlier years) cannot increase its frequency to the city as its passengers now are just from Maasin and the towns between Maasin and Bontoc. In rolling cargo, unless they do some sacrifice they cannot match the rates of the ROROs serving Hilongos and Bato because the distance of the two from Cebu is shorter.

There is even no hope now of a fielding a RORO to the ports of Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian because in rates it can never compete with the Hilongos and Bato ROROs whose rates will be much lower because of the much shorter distance. Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian might be a little far but a car or a truck can easily roll to that and the fuel consumed will be much less compared to a RORO rate. Plus the total time will be way shorter. No way they can really win.

I do not think this situation will change in the future because one can’t change geography.  And thus one thing that could have boosted Maasin, that of being a good port of entry is really not around. Maasin could also not be a port of entry from Surigao like in the old past when ports were lacking because it is the farthest locality of Southern Leyte from Surigao.

In my wandering thoughts , I cannot even understand why Maasin became the capital of Southern Leyte when Sogod is the center point of the three “tentacles” of the province – the series of towns to Maasin, the series of towns to Silago and the series of towns to San Ricardo at the tip of Panaon island. Sogod could have been the commercial town of the province but a direct ship to Cebu hampered that, I think. Now, so-many intermodal trucks roam Southern Leyte already.

In the old past, liners from Manila also came to Maasin, Sogod and Cabalian. But those days are long gone now and will never come back again. Intermodal trucks from Manila have already cobbled up many of the cargo to the eastern seaboard of the country so much so that the old great port of Tacloban is diminished now.

And that also diminished Maasin port. Especially since the Palawan Princess of Sulpicio Lines which called on the port before is also gone now. Whatever, long live Maasin!

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Camotes Sea and Bohol Strait Are Graveyards of Failed Shipping Companies (Part 1)

The Camotes Sea and Bohol Strait are two of the busiest shipping lanes in the country. These are the seas connecting Leyte and Bohol to the trade and commercial center of the central part of the country which is Cebu. Ships from Cebu going to Samar, Masbate, Mindanao and even Luzon have to pass through these seas also along with the foreign ships calling in Cebu. Over-all, the related Camotes Sea and Bohol Strait as sea connections are only rivaled by Manila Bay and the Verde Island Passage in the density of ships sailing and the three are the busiest shipping corridors in the country. There are many shipping companies operating here, both ferry and cargo. However, in terms of absolute numbers, this is also the area with the most number of failed shipping companies in the last 15 or 20 years when a Ph.D. from Philippine Institute of Development Studies (PIDS) said there is no competition or there is no effective competition or there is just mild competition in most routes here. Of course, she was definitely wrong if we sift through the evidence and among the most persuasive of evidences will be the number of shipping companies that failed. Why would they fail if there is no or only mild or no significant competition? Did they commit suicide? Of course not!

The greatest failure in this area is, of course, the big Cebu Ferries Corporation (CFC), the subsidiary of the giant merged shipping company WG&A Philippines which was probably the biggest regional shipping company ever. Their old ships were gone and dead before their time is up because those were sent to the hangmen of ships, the shipbreakers. Their newer ferries, the MV Cebu Ferry 1, the MV Cebu Ferry 2 and the MV Cebu Ferry 3 (the Cebu Ferry series) were transferred to the successor company 2GO Travel and those ferries were sent to Batangas and they are jokingly called the “Batangas Ferries” because they were no longer in Cebu.

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Cebu Ferry 1 leaving Cebu for Batangas

Once upon a time, this company ruled the roost here when they had so many ferries, many of which were hand-me-down liners or equal to liners in caliber. These hand-me-downs were actually much better and bigger than the overnight ferries of their competition. Their only drawback were their big and generally thirsty engines which was needed for speed requirement of the liner routes. Before the Cebu Ferries series came, some ten ships that passed to the Cebu Ferries Corporation fleet were sent to the breakers and most of them were still sailing good when they were sent to the cutters.

For more on this shipping company, I have a separate article:

https://psssonline.wordpress.com/2016/05/15/the-grand-start-of-cebu-ferries-corporation-cfc/

Probably the next biggest casualty in this area is the Palacio Lines (a.k.a. FJP Lines) which had its origins in Western Samar. In their heyday they had routes from Cebu to Bantayan island, Masbate, Northern Samar, Western Samar, Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Negros Oriental and Misamis Occidental. They lost some routes because of paradigm changes like in Bantayan island when they were torpedoed by the short-distance ferry-ROROs from Hagnaya (which is a much shorter route than their route from Cebu City). Palacio Lines was slow in betting on ROROs and they did not immediately see that the paradigm will shift to the intermodal system (as they still acquired cruisers even in the early 1990s).

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Don Martin Sr. 8 not sailing before she was sold to breakers

Later, there were complaints about their ships which progressively got older and less reliable and soon competition was outstripping them. And finally the pressure from these (like Cokaliong Shipping Lines and Lite Ferries) ultimately did them in. They stopped sailing and soon they sold their remaining ferries one by one. This included their MV Bantayan (sold to Orlines Sea-Land Transport), MV Calbayog (sold to Starlite Ferries) and MV Don Martin Sr. 6 (supposedly sold to a Lucena concern). Meanwhile, their biggest ship, the MV Don Martin Sr. 8 was sent to the breakers. And the cruiser ships of the company were even laid up earlier. Their cargo ship, the MV Don Martin which was the first vessel of the company was also sold and this ended up with Quincela Shipping in Manila.

Former fleet: Calbayog, Bantayan, Don Martin Sr. Don Martin Sr. 3, Don Martin Sr. 6, Don Martin Sr. 7, Don Martin Sr. 8, Don Martin

The Rose Shipping Company which is also known as Vicente Atilano (after the owner) is probably the next most prominent loser in the shipping wars in this place. Originally they were a Zamboanga del Sur shipping company from the old town of Margosatubig. Leaving that area, they tried their luck here and they fully engaged in the wars in the Leyte routes especially against Aboitiz Shipping Corporation. One of their weakness, however, is their total reliance on cruiser ferries. Being obsolete, this type of ship progressively cannot compete with the ROROs in revenues (but not in comfort and service). Rolling cargo revenue is actually bigger and more significant than passenger revenues. They then stopped sailing and most of their ships had no takers even if for sale because almost nobody looks around for cruisers anymore. Their only notable ship sales were the MV April Rose which went to Atienza Shipping Lines in Manila and the MV Yellow Rose which went to Medallion Transport. Their MV Cherry Rose and MV Pink Rose were broken up while their MV White Rose and MV Tiffany Rose are missing and are presumed to be broken up. Their MV Pink Rose and MV Red Rose can’t also be found now and in all likelihood have been scrapped too by now.

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The Pink Rose in her last days

Maypalad Shipping which was earlier known as K&T Shipping is one of the older shipping companies in the area. They have disparate routes from as far as Lanao del Norte, Leyte, Southern Leyte and Samar. They seemed to have never really recovered from the sinking of their MV Kalibo Star which was their newest ship then and progressively their ships got older. They were also victims of routes that bit by bit weakened because of competition from other routes (like the Liloan route losing to the Bato and Hilongos routes and the Tacloban route losing to the Ormoc and Baybay routes). In due time, they had no good routes left and their ships were also unable to compete in the bigger routes.

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Part of the Maypalad Shipping fleet after it ceased operations

Among these bigger failures, it is Maypalad Shipping which has a fleet of cargo ships but upon being defunct all of these got anchored too in Mactan Channel. Their MV Cebu Star and MV Guiuan were broken up now while their MV Cabalian Star, MV Leyte Star and MV Tacloban Star could all also be gone now. Their MV Samar Star is the only sure extant ship now along with one freighter which may be too far gone now. Three other cargo ships of their wer also broken or sold to breakers and their LCT is also missing.

Roly Shipping and Godspeed Shipping and Ernesto Alvarado are actually legal-fiction entities of the other. They had routes before to Leyte and Bohol. But being a cruiser ferry company, they slow lost to the ROROs since this type of ship earns more revenues because the rolling cargo revenue is such that they can actually afford not to carry passengers as shown by the Cargo RORO LCTs. Some of their earlier ships were gone a long time ago (the MV Flo Succour, the MV Reyjumar-A, the MV Isabel 2 and the MV Tubigon Ferry). The tried to fight back with fast cruisers, the MV Roly 2, the MV Mega Asiana and the MV Tagbilaran Ferry but ultimately they lost too and quit a few years ago when the banks seized their ships and were laid up. The pressure of tightening competition was simply too great and the revenues were not enough to sustain operations. There were also allegations of internal rot.

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Mega Asiana and Tagbilaran Ferry cannibalized

Jadestar Shipping is another cruiser ferry company which just had a single route, the Cebu-Tubigon route. Then the ROROs of Lite Shipping came to Tubigon, four schedules in all daily. With a full load of rolling cargo these ships will not need any passengers to earn. And then a new paradigm came, the cheap but not-so-speedy but fastcrafts of the legal-fiction entities Sea Highway Carrier and SITI Inter-island and Cargo Services which were more popularly known as Star Crafts. Squeezed by two better competitors, Jadestar Shipping found they could not sustain operations and quit a few years ago (in connection with this, Island Shipping which also operated cruiser ships in the Cebu-Tubigon route also quit showing cruisers cannot beat ROROs).

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Jadestar Seis now in Ibnerizam Shipping fleet in Zamboanga

Some of the ships Jadestar Shipping were sold to other shipping companies like the MV Jadestar Tres which went to Wellington Lim and became a cargo ship and the MV Jadestar Seis which went to the Ibnerizam Shipping of Zamboanga). Two of their ships was broken up earlier and this were the MV Jadestar Nueve and MV Jadestar Doce. Head-on, the cruisers can only compete now in Zamboanga (but then that is another situation).

Former fleet: Jadestar, Jadestar Dos (cargo), Jadestar Tres, Jadestar Seis, Jadestar Nueve, Jadestar Doce.

Kinswell Shipping made a big splash when they started in 2002 because what they introduced were China-built vessels that were not of the usual design or hull material. Some of these are actually very small and not bigger than boats and were a little queer. But their Medium Speed Crafts (MSCs) could have been winners had they been handled well. One sold one, the MV Gloria G-1 is sailing well for Gabisan Shipping and the comparable Star Crafts were also successful.

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The derelict Kinswell boats

They tried many routes and the name of the ships reflected where they were sailing. The smallest ones were the first to quit sailing as it found no great patronage because they simply bobbed too much in unsettled seas. Now they are jut anchored near the Tayud shipyards. Being fiberglass they will not sink or rust and so up to this day those remain as floating markers outside Cansaga Bay. All their three bigger ships, the MSCs were sold, the MV Kinswell, MV Kinswell II and lastly, the MV Kinswell Cebu. They have no more sailing ships left.

Former fleet: Kinswell, Kinswell II, Kinswell Cebu (2), Kins Bantayan, Kins Ormoc, Kins Danao, Cadiznon 3, Kins Camotes.

San Juan Shipping of Leyte is another hard-luck company. They were doing relatively well with their first two ferries, the MV Sr. San Jose, a beautiful cruiser and the MV John Carrier-1, a small ferry even though competition to the Leyte route was already stiffening. Now, I wonder how they were sweet-talked into purchasing the MV Dona Cristina of the Cebu Ferries Corporation. This overnight ferry was a former regional ship of the Carlos A. Gothong Lines, Inc. (CAGLI) whose old ships invariably has a history of engine troubles (except for MV Our Lady of Mt. Carmel). However, it was already WG&A, the merged shipping company which sold the ship to them. Maybe they thought that since the name WG&A was glistening then, then the ship must be good.

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The remains of San Juan Ferry (Photo by Kontiki Diving Club-Cebu)

This ship which became the MV San Juan Ferry in their fleet and became the flagship and biggest ship. San Juan Shipping spent money to refurbish this ship. However, the ship brought misery to them when a explosion hit the ship and caught fire while on trials off Liloan, Cebu. The ship then sank. San Juan Shipping never recovered from that debacle especially since competition then to Leyte was very fierce. They then sold out to Lite Ferries lock, stock and barrel and it was there that Lite Ferries gained a foothold to Leyte.

M.Y. Lines is unique in a sense that when wooden motor boats were already on their way out they sort of made a revival out of it. They had two big, wooden motor boats in a fleet of three but one, the beautiful MV M.Y. Katrina was wrecked in a typhoon and scrapped. They bounced from one route to another and was never able to fully settle especially since they were using non-ROROs when ROROs had already come into full force and was proving its superiority. They tried to find niche routes in northwestern Leyte but was never able to really discover one. One thing that torpedoed them there was the opening of the Bogo-Palompon route and the rolling of Ceres buses from Cebu to that corner of Leyte. Later, their ferries were seized by the banks and laid up.

Former fleet: M.Y. Katrina, Michael-3, Sunriser

(To be continued)

The Sunset of Tacloban Port

Tacloban City is the regional commercial center of Eastern Visayas and this has been so for about a century now. It has the advantage of a central location and a sheltered port and bay. Its reach weakens, however, in the western coast of Leyte which has its own sea connections to a greater trade and commercial center, the great city of Cebu which has been ascendant in the south of the Philippines since half a millennium ago. 

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http://image.slidesharecdn.com/easternvisayasfinal-150407210918-conversion-gate01/95/eastern-visayas-biliran-2-638.jpg?cb=1428459126

As a regional commercial center, it is but natural for Tacloban to have a great port with trade routes to many places. That has been the situation of Tacloban since before World War II and even before World War I. It also does not hurt that Tacloban is the capital of the province of Leyte. In fact, because of her superior strategic location, Tacloban even exceeded her mother town which is Palo which is still the seat of the church hierarchy.

Before World War II and after that, passenger-cargo ships from Manila will drop by first in Masbate, Catbalogan and Calbayog before hooking route and proceeding to Tacloban. Some of these ships will then still proceed to Surigao and Butuan or even Cagayan de Oro using the eastern seaboard of Leyte. Tacloban then was the fulcrum of these liner routes going to Eastern Visayas. That route was much stronger than the routes that drop by Ormoc and Maasin and perhaps Sogod and Cabalian before going to Surigao. The two routes were actually competing (like Ormoc and Tacloban are competing). If the route via Tacloban was stronger it is because Tacloban was the trade and commercial center of the region.

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At its peak, Tacloban port hosted some seven passenger-cargo ships from Manila per week from different liner companies. She also had daily regular calls from passenger-cargo ships emanating from Cebu. There were also some ships that originate from as far as Davao which dropped by Surigao first. Such was the importance of Tacloban port then which can still be seen in the size of Tacloban port and the bodegas surrounding it.

There were many liner companies that called over the years in Tacloban from Manila. Among them were Sulpicio Lines (and the earlier Carlos A. Gothong & Co.), Compania Maritima, General Shipping Company, Philippine Steam and Navigation Company, Philippine Pioneer Lines (and later the successor Galaxy Lines), Escano Lines, Sweet Lines, even the combined Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. and Lorenzo Shipping Corporation. When it was still sailing local routes, even De la Rama Steamship served Tacloban. Among the minor liner companies, Royal Lines Inc., Veloso Brothers Ltd., N&S Lines, Philippine Sea Transport and Oriental Shipping Agency also served Tacloban. Not all of those served at the same time but that line-up of shipping companies will show how great was Tacloban port then.

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Gorio Belen research in the National Library

For many years there was even a luxury liner rivalry in Tacloban port. This was the battle which featured the Dona Angelina of Sulpicio Lines and the Sweet Rose of Sweet Lines which mainly happened in the 1970s. Sweet Rose was sailing to Tacloban from the late 1960s and was in fact the first luxury liner to that port. The two liners were the best ships then sailing to Tacloban port. The rest, of course, were mainly ex-”FS” ships which was the backbone of the national liner fleet then and there was no shame in that.

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Gorio Belen research in the National Library

Tacloban port was doing well until the late 1970’s when a paradigm change pulled the rug from under their feet. This development was the fielding of a RORO by Cardinal Shipping, the Cardinal Ferry I that connected Sorsogon and Samar. With San Juanico bridge already connecting Samar and Leyte and the Maharlika Highway already completed, intermodal trucks and buses started rolling into Tacloban and Leyte. In fact, in just one year of operation the intermodal link was already a roaring success with many trucks and buses already running to Manila. Soon other ferries were connecting Sorsogon and Samar including the Maharlika I of the government.

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Gorio Belen research in the National Library

With this development the irreversible decline of Tacloban port began. It was a slide that never ever saw a reversal because what happened over the years was the buses and trucks rolling to Tacloban and Leyte just continued to multiply without abatement (and the ROROs in San Bernardino Strait also increased in number). Soon the passengers were already filling the intermodal buses and freight except the heaviest and the bulkiest was also slowly shifted to the trucks. Over the years the number of passenger ships to Tacloban slowly declined as a consequence.

In the late 1980’s, when the pressure of the intermodal was great there were still three national shipping lines with routes to Tacloban – Sulpicio Lines, William Lines and Sweet Lines. In the early 1990’s. when Sweet Lines quit shipping only the top two shipping lines then where still sailing to Tacloban with the Tacloban Princess of Sulpicio Lines and the Masbate Uno of William Lines. Incidentally, the infamous Dona Paz which burned and sank after a collision with a tanker in December 1987 originated from Tacloban.

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Tacloban Princess by John Carlos Cabanillas

When the WG&A merger came in 1996 the company pulled out the Masbate I from the Tacloban route. The last liners ever to sail the Tacloban route were the Tacloban Princess and the Cebu Princess which alternated in the route. Both belonged to Sulpicio Lines. The liner route from Manila to Tacloban was finally severed when Sulpicio Lines got suspended from passenger service as a consequence of the sinking of the Princess of the Stars when both the Tacloban Princess and the Cebu Princess were sold.

The overnight ferry service from Cebu almost followed the same path and died at almost the same time. The last three shipping companies which had a route there were Roly Shipping, Maypalad Shipping and Cebu Ferries Corporation (which was the successor of CAGLI). But passengers slowly learned that the routes via Ormoc and Baybay were faster and cheaper and the connection was oh-so-easy as the bus terminals of the two cities were just outside the port gates of Ormoc and Baybay. The High Speed Crafts (HSCs) to Ormoc, mainly SuperCat and Oceanjet also made great strides and captured a large portion of the passenger market and it further denied passengers for Tacloban. With the HSCs and overnight ships from Cebu that leave Ormoc in the morning there was no longer any need for Tacloban passengers to wait until night.

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http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/Paralyzed-Philippine-Port-Resumes-Operations-2013-11-21

The last rope for Tacloban port passenger-cargo ships was cut when the new coastal highway from Basey, Samar to Guiuan, Eastern Samar was completed. With that the passenger ships connecting Tacloban and Guiuan had to go as the fast and ubiquitous commuter vans (called “V-hire” in the province) suddenly supplanted them. Trucks also began rolling and some of these were even coming from Cebu via the intermodal.

Now only a few cargo ships dock in Tacloban port. There is still one cargo shipping company based in Tacloban, the Lilygene Sea Shipping Transport Corp. Gothong Southern Shipping Lines meanwhile still has a regular container ship to Tacloban but there are complaints that the rates are high (the consequence of no competition). Whatever, there are still cargoes better carried by ships than by trucks. However, some of the container vans for Leyte are just offloaded now in Cebu and transferred through Cargo RORO LCTs going to several western Leyte ports.

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What might remain for a long time maybe in Tacloban port are the big motor bancas for Buad island in Western Samar which hosts the town of Daram and Bagatao island which hosts the town of Zumarraga. I am not sure of the long-term existence of the other motor bancas for the other Samar towns except for maybe Talalora as more and more they have buses that go to Tacloban and maybe soon the commuter vans will follow. Or maybe even the jeep. The lesson is with roads established the sea connection always have to go in the long term.

Tacloban port is improved now. Improving the port eases port operations but it will not make the ships come back contrary to what the PPA (Philippine Ports Authority) and the government say. It is cargo and passengers that make the ships come to a port but if there are other and better transportation modes that are already available then cargo and passenger volumes drop and sometimes it becomes uneconomical for the ship to continue operating.

So I really wonder what is the point in developing a port in the nearby town of Babatngon as an alternative to Tacloban port. Have the Philippine Ports Authority ever asked who wants to use it? It is not surprising however as the PPA is the master of creating “ports to nowhere” (ports with practically no traffic) especially in the time of Gloria Macapagal Arroyo who was so fond of those (for many “reasons”, of course).

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Ormoc Port by John Luzares

In the past two decades the PPA always touted Tacloban port. For maybe they are based there. There was a denial that actually Ormoc port was already the main gateway to Leyte and it is no longer Tacloban port. Recently however, there seems to be an acknowledgment of the real score — that Ormoc port has actually been the de facto gateway already. The government is now developing Ormoc port and it is good that the PPA vessel arrival and departure site already covers it.

Whatever and however they try, it cannot be denied that the sun is already setting in Tacloban port. It is no longer the same port it used to be in the past because of the intermodal assault changed things.

Like they say, things always change.

The Remaining Cruiser Ferries of Cebu Port

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The cruiser era is near to drawing to a close in the Philippines, maybe. Cruisers might hold on to Zamboanga but I don’t know anywhere else. In the Port of Cebu they might have been gone now except for three hold-outs, the Lapu-lapu Shipping, Gabisan Shipping and South Pacific Transport which don’t operate ROROs. But recent rumor say Gabisan will sell one of its cruisers, either the Gloria Two or Gloria Three and in its place will come the former Maharlika Cinco of Archipelago Philippine Ferries which supposedly will become the Gloria V in their fleet. This ferry is now undergoing renovation and refitting in Leyte and she is a big one. Seems Gabisan Shipping also wants a slice of the growing rolling cargo traffic to Leyte using Hilongos port.

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The cruiser ferries of Lapu-lapu Shipping, the Lapu-lapu Ferry 1, Lapu-lapu Ferry 8 and Rosalia 3 are really fighting very hard. From simple tejeras they now have bunks and even a Tourist section. They have been pressured by the coming of Montenegro Shipping Lines to Cataingan, Masbate, their old staple but they did not budge. They are even pressured more in Baybay City by Roble Shipping. They have already withdrawn from the Villaba, Leyte route. As cruisers they have nowhere to go; they have to dig in their heels and try to survive all the onslaughts.

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The five cruiser ships of Lapu-lapu Shipping and Gabisan Shipping are all bunched up between Pier 2 and Pier 3 of Cebu port and many times they dock diagonally to save up on limited wharf space. Sometimes they are joined by a Gemini ship of Isla de Bantayan Shipping. But these Geminis are not really passenger-cargo ships.

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Also still present in Cebu port are the two cruiser ferries of South Pacific Transport, the South Pacific and Fiji-II which have a route to Bato, Leyte. These ships are known that will never give up because they are owned by Fortune ShipWorks, a shipyard in Tayud which has also a freighter company and will live as long as the owners want them.

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Docking not far from the seven is the VG 1 (and the former Andy Two) of VG Shipping which has a route to Talibon, Bohol. This lady is an old survivor from being the Princess of Samar of the defunct Western Samar Shipping Lines and as the Princess Joan of the defunct Georgia Shipping Lines. I don’t know right now if she was the former Joan Glory of the defunct Glory Shipping Lines. She is re-engined with Weichai from Dynamic Power now so it means she will still be around for a while.

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I am not sure if the Super Island Express II of Island Shipping has already quit or was replaced. She is also a cruiser ferry and has a route to Tubigon, Bohol. Once upon a time Island Shipping has a big presence in the Tubigon route until slowly they were pushed by the ROROs of Lite Ferries and the cruisers of Jadestar Shipping which are gone now, which surrendered the fight when they realized their cruisers cannot match the ROROs of Lite Ferries and the fastcrafts of Star Crafts.

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I don’t know if Island Shipping will attempt a comeback. They have enough ROPAX LCTs now. They even sold their Island RORO II which they should have used to hold their Tubigon route, in my view. This became the VG RORO II of VG Shipping.

Rose Shipping/V. Atilano with its cruiser ferries is now gone too. And to think in its heyday they have been involved in wars across the Camotes Sea versus the Aboitiz Shipping Corporation which is also gone now. What a sad end and it seems it is only their April Rose and Yellow Rose which has survived in other hands. However, only Yellow Rose is remaining in Cebu but not sailing. Her last duty was as restaurant-tour ship with the name Lady of the Gate of JJA Transport.

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Aside from Jadestar Shipping, another recent casualty which quit was the Roly Shipping/Godspeed Shipping/Ernesto Alvarado combine. I thought they will survive somehow as they have a more diversified route system (Leyte and Bohol) but I heard there were internal difficulties and one day they were just gone like Jadestar. Their Roly-1 capsized in a shipyard and their Tagbilaran Ferry and Mega Asiana were cannibalized in Star Marine Shipyard in Tayud, Cebu and are technically dead ships.

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Maypalad Shipping meanwhile had a very slow death. Their tied-up ships in Mactan Channel disappeared slowly over several years but as of last count two freighters are still there and their Samar Star is still in Star Marine Shipyard but this is an early generation RORO. Their Guiuan, however was a cruiser ferry. It is now gone.

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Another solitary cruiser that is still tied up is the Ormoc Star of Roble Shipping which is still in Pier 7 but it seems it is no longer in sailing condition. A few years ago, the Melrivic Ten which has a route to Poro, Camotes also quit and was sold to shipping company that has a Cuyo route from Manila. Melrivic Nine has quit the Toledo-San Carlos route and is laid up in Dunggo-an, Danao City. I wonder if owner Aznar Shipping will want to use her revive their Cebu-Poro route.

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So Cebu Port has just some ten cruiser ferries surviving now but not all are in sailing condition and some might be technically dead ships now (intact but no longer capable of sailing). There are however cruiser ferries on the western side of Cebu island under the hands of Island Shipping and PAR Transport. Those are still sailing.

Take your views and pictures of them now. Who knows if they will still be around in a decade’s time. For sure, when they go, there will no longer be cruiser replacements. The replacements, if ever there will be any, will for sure be ROROs. If not, LCTs which are booming now.

This is a tribute to them. I cannot say “Long live” because I know they will be gone in a few years time. For sure.

The Leyte Ports to Cebu

Talking of Leyte, I am referring to the old Leyte province which included Biliran, Southern Leyte and Panaon island. The reason is port and route competition does not actually respect current political boundaries. Biliran and Panaon islands are connected by bridges to Leyte hence there is no practical physical division separating them from the main island of Leyte.

In the recent past and including ports used by RORO Cargo LCTs, there were many Leyte ports with scheduled connections to Cebu. Starting from Cabalian (San Juan), that includes, counter-clockwise, the ports of Liloan, Sogod, Maasin, Bato, Hilongos, Hindang, Baybay, IDHI Port (Albuera), Ormoc, GGC (Ormoc), Pingag (Isabel), Isabel, Palompon, Villaba, San Isidro, Naval and Tacloban. This list does not include ports that lost connection to Cebu much earlier like San Francisco, Malitbog and Calubian. There are so many Leyte ports with Cebu connection because Leyte is economically tethered to Cebu. And Cebu is the true regional center of the middle of the Visayas.

However, in recent years, some of these ports waned with the development of the roads and land transport including the ubiquitous commuter van. Cabalian, Liloan and Sogod, all in Southern Leyte, lost its regular connections to Cebu. Even the supposed main port of entry to the province, the Maasin port was much weakened. The reason for this was the rise of commuter vans and buses connecting to the arriving and departing ships. Bato and Hilongos became the main ports of entry for Southern Leyte even though they are located in another province. From these two ports, connecting vans and buses rolled to Maasin and to towns beyond. The vans and buses also passed through the shortcut mountain road to go as far as Sogod, Cabalian, Silago and Panaon island. These land transports have dedicated connections with the ferries and tickets can be bought even in Cebu or aboard the ferry.

These connecting rides are actually faster compared to the old ferries going to Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian. With dawn arrivals of the ships in the entry ports, most of the passengers will be at their homes by breakfast. Even in the farthest destinations it will be well before lunch when the passengers will arrive. Compare this to the near or lunch arrivals of the ships to Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian before. And besides these new ferry plus van modes are cheaper than the old ships to Southern Leyte. In the process, Bato and Hilongos ports became more important.

Going to Cebu, these same vans and buses also brought the passengers to the ships. Besides, it is also easy for people of Southern Leyte to take the local bus and local van to Maasin. If there is a ship there then they can take that. If there is none, it is so easy for to take another ride to Bato port. Others can also take the national highway to Mahaplag junction. From there it is just a short distance away to Baybay port where there are also daily and multiple departures like in Hilongos and Bato.

This syndrome is a fine example that shows it is not only shipping companies within a route that compete. Actually, several parallel routes and the shipping companies plying those are all competing and superior routes can sometimes sink inferior routes like the Cebu routes to Sogod, Liloan and Cabalian. Well, such parallel competition can even sink ship companies as shown in recent Leyte history when the shipping companies serving Cabalian, Liloan and Sogod went under. This syndrome is clearly not known or understood by the research paper on shipping competition done by Myrna S. Austria.

http://pascn.pids.gov.ph/files/Discussions%20Papers/2002/2002-04.pdf

Another far port of Leyte that lost its connection to Cebu is Tacloban port. Passengers learned to use Palompon, Ormoc and Baybay ports as ports of entry and then just transfer to a van or a bus. The land transport terminals of the three localities just lie outside the port gates so transferring is no problem. With this mode, passengers will arrive in Tacloban earlier and at less cost. Going to Cebu from Tacloban, the riding process is just reversed and it is that easy too. Besides, in Ormoc and Baybay there are many ships departing and in Ormoc there is even a day departure. Also, there are High Speed Crafts in Ormoc for those who are in a hurry or who just wants more comfort. So, slowly the Tacloban ships lost patronage until they finally stopped sailing. Again, such syndrome was not known or understood by the research paper on shipping competition by Myrna S. Austria which compartmentalized routes and assumed that other routes have no effect or influence on one particular route.

If that were so, then the likes of Maypalad Shipping Corporation that held Liloan, Sogod and Tacloban routes might have survived. This was the fate too of other shipping companies that held routes to Villaba, Tabango and San Isidro like M.Y. Shipping and Rose Shipping. Daily there are many ships to Ormoc while the service to those three towns were not daily. There is even a day ship and High Speed Crafts from three companies. In Ormoc the land transport terminal is just outside the port gates and there are a lot of buses and vans to Villaba, Tabango and San Isidro on the northwest corner of Leyte. With the competition from the Ormoc ships, the shipping companies serving Villaba, Tabango and San Isidro quit and now there are no more ships to those ports from Cebu. They were simply torpedoed by a parallel route which is Cebu-Ormoc. Again, the paper on shipping by Myrna S. Austria did not see or understand that.

Naval in Biliran, as a port, was also weakened by parallel routes like the port of Maasin and to think both are ports of provincial capitals and supposedly the main ports of entry to their provinces. Naval is also impacted by the parallel route to Ormoc because from Ormoc there are plenty of vans and buses to Biliran. And Ormoc has daily departures from Cebu while Ormoc does not have such. For those who failed to catch the night ship there are also the High Speed Crafts and day ferries to Ormoc. Naval simply does not have such option. Besides, if there is a ship to Palompon the traveler to Biliran can also take that and again the bus terminal is just outside Palompon port. Clearly, Myrna S. Austria never dreamed provincial ports can be weakened by far and near parallel routes. That was her mistake in treating routes and ports as insulated from one another. This might be unknown to her but people of Leyte know that even from a young age since they come and go to Cebu.

In Myrna S. Austria’s research paper, the routes I enumerated above that lost ships are generally classified as having “no competition”. Ports lost ships, routes were dropped and shipping companies sank because there was “no competition”?? With regards to Leyte, her paper is obviously erroneous (it is erroneous in other parts of the Philippines too and I will show that in future articles).

Even with less players the routes from Cebu to Leyte are all vibrant and shipping companies compete well. Now, it is even more dynamic with the arrival of the RORO Cargo LCTs which compete now with the traditional Cebu-Leyte shipping companies. With them there are new routes and new ports in use. The traditional shipping companies have already reacted to them and one way is by also joining the fray or their mode. They are friendlier now to rolling cargo as the intermodal way is obvious already that that is the way of the future.

There is “lack of competition”? Nah, that is only a figment of imagination in Myrna S. Austria’s paper.