The Sweet RORO

Many, when talking about the Sweet RORO of Sweet Lines Incorporated which is pf Bohol origin talk about her technicals and that is not wrong as there is nothing incorrect in admiring the technical merits of a ship especially that of a luxury liner. But to me I also tend to look at the historical position of things and how they interacted as I am also keen on the historical perspective of the ferries when they came and also their roles. After all, ferries make the shipping companies, at least in the early decades of our shipping history. And, it is in the great liners in which shipping companies are identified by the public.

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The Sweet RORO in original livery. Photo by Lindsay Bridge.

The Sweet RORO came to Sweet Lines when from the peak of the company a great slide was already happening them. This came from a probable mistake when in the late 1970’s the company decided they would henceforth just buy small liners. It was a great reversal from the previous mantra of the company that they will bring great liners, the prime examples of which were the highly regarded Sweet Faith and Sweet Home which were former luxury liners even in Europe. Also included in that was the Sweet Grace which was acquired brand-new from West Germany.

That bad decision came when the top liners of the company, the aforementioned Sweet Faith and the Sweet Home were already graying and if analyzed technically were already threatening to quit in a few years time (and they subsequently did). Coupled with that that the former cargo-passenger ship from Europe, the Sweet Bliss, the Sweet Life/Sweet Dream, the Sweet Lord/Sweet Land and the Sweet Love which buoyed the company early on and helped in their rise were also growing old as they were also built in the 1950’s like the Sweet Faith and the Sweet Home and ferries then were not known to exceed 30 years of life as the metallurgy and technology were still not the same as today when ferries normally exceed 40 years of service life here. Spare and surplus parts are easy to find today and CNC milling of parts are already common whereas that was not the case of 40 years ago. When that decision to just acquire small ferries was made the six liners of Sweet Lines from Europe were already approaching 30 years old save for the Sweet Home (but then this luxury liner, the biggest of her time was actually the first to go because of mechanical problems).

The year 1980 came and one of the biggest crisis in local liner shipping came. This happened when a lot of liners were suddenly laid up because the container ships came into full force all at once and suddenly the old passenger-cargo liners no longer had enough cargo to carry and it was actually cargo which is decisive in the profitability of a passenger-cargo ship. Before the arrival of the container ships of Aboitiz Shipping Corporation, William Lines, Sulpicio Lines, Lorenzo Shipping Corporation, Central Shipping Corporation (the cargo shipping company of Sweet Lines), Sea Transport Company, Negros Navigation Company and Solid Shipping Lines, it was practically just the passenger-cargo liners which were carrying the cargo in liner routes.

Sweet Home was gone in 1979, sold, and Sweet Faith was also gone the next year in 1980, first laid up then sold to the breakers. The new decade came and Sweet Lines had no ship good enough for the premier Manila-Cebu route which they used to dominate albeit with just a small pull only early in the 1970’s but largely gone as the decade was winding down. What they had left to serve as flagship was the cruiser liner Sweet Grace which was ordered brand-new from West Germany in 1968 but which does not have the speed and the size of the now-dominant fast cruiser liners of that era already.

While Sweet Lines was saddled with such problem William Lines rolled out the half-cruiser, half-RORO Dona Virginia in December 1979 which was the biggest liner in the country when she was fielded and with a speed of 20 knots too like the liner she was replacing, the storied Cebu City which came brand-new just in 1972. Then Sulpicio Lines rolled out the Philippine Princess in 1981 and this liner was nearly as big as the Dona Virginia but not as fast. Sweet Grace was far smaller than the two unlike the flagship Filipinas of Compania Maritima which was nearly as big as Dona Virginia and Philippine Princess although not as fast as the two. Sweet Grace was also much slower than the three, she cannot even be considered as a fast cruiser liner and so for the first time since Sweet Lines raised the bar in the Manila-Cebu premier route in 1970 with the Sweet Faith, this time it found itself as the laggard and outmatched. And that was where the decision to just buy small liners bit Sweet Lines hard.

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Photo from a research of Gorio Belen in the National Library

Having money from the proceeds of the disposals of Sweet Home and Sweet Faith, Sweet Lines was obliged to look for their replacement and it is forced that it should be a good and a big one. They did not disappoint when the former Ferry Ruby of the Diamond Ferry which plies the Osaka to Oichi route came to them in 1982 (but the seller was a third by the name of Dimerco Line SA of Panama and more on that later). The ship was nearly as big as her main competitors at 117.5 meters length and 4,700 gross register tons and at 18 knots design speed she was not giving away much to her direct competition, the flagships of the other liner companies although she was still the slowest at full trot among the flagships. And so what Sweet Lines emphasized was her being a RORO liner and its swiftness in cargo loading and unloading. However, the claim of Sweet Lines that she was the first RORO liner in the country is incorrect as the Sta. Maria of Negros Navigation Company came earlier in 1980. She, however, was the first big RORO liner in the country if the Dona Virginia is excluded.

When analyzed technically, the Sweet RORO is a leapfrog in technology compared to her main competitors which were mainly cruiser liners, the old paradigm. She was already a full-pledged ROPAX (RORO-Passenger) ship unlike the Dona Virginia whereas the Philippine Princess and the Filipinas of Compania Maritima were still cruiser ships . Now these four are all flagships and only four shipping companies were competing seriously in the prime Manila-Cebu route as the others like Aboitiz Shipping Corporation and Escano Lines were no longer in serious contention in that route and the others have practically withdrawn from contention there like Lorenzo Shipping Corporation and Carlos A. Gothong Lines Incorporated (but this company later made a comeback in that route). By the way, Negros Navigation Company is not being mentioned here as she was not doing the Manila-Cebu route then.

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Credits to Philippine Daily Express and Gorio Belen

But Sweet RORO might have been too much ahead of her time. Loading vehicles was not yet the wont then in her route (and neither now except for brand-new cars headed for car dealers down south). Container vans were mainly carried by the container ships and at that time there were still a lot of XEUs, the 10-foot container vans which can be handled by forklifts or loaded atop the cruisers at their bow and/or stern. Using chassis for container vans was not yet the standard then and so the full advantage of being a RORO or Roll-on, Roll-off ship was not fully realized when a lot of cargo was still palletized or are still carried loose (however, Sweet RORO had advantage over the others in carrying vehicles and heavy equipment down South). It would be nearly a decade later when the TEUs, the 20-foot container vans will be the new standard in cargo loading and by that time the Sweet RORO was already gone.

The Sweet RORO, the former Ferry Ruby was built by Onomichi Dockyard (Onomichi Zosen) in Onomichi, Japan in 1970 (but Sweet Lines says she was built in another yard) as one of the fast overnight ferries of Japan that bypasses their clogged highways then. She was average in size then (but this is not to disparage her) at 117.5 meters in Length Over-all, 107.0 meters in Length Between Perpendiculars, 20.6 meters in Breadth and 4,619 tons in Gross Register Tonnage. She was 1,943 tons in Net Register Tonnage and 1,477 tons in Deadweight Tonnage. This RORO liner was powered by 4 Kawasaki-MAN V8V 22/30ATL diesel engines with a combined 8,080hp which gave her a top speed of 18 knots which was also average for her size during her time. At that power she would have been more economical in fuel than the other flagships.

The stem of the ship was raked and she had transom stern. She was equipped with ramps bow and aft as access to the car deck. The ship has three decks for the passengers, the uppermost one a local addition (and that deck contained a lobby/relaxation room, the First Class bar and disco plus a game room) and abaft of the funnels is a wide open-air promenade area/sun deck. Aside from First Class and Second Class, a part of her Third Class (now known as “Economy”) is also airconditioned. This is because as-built the ship was fully air-conditioned. Her original passenger capacity as refitted was 1,692, one of the highest then among passenger ships in the country. It was broken down into 148 in 1st Class, 144 in 2nd Class, 400 in air-conditioned 3rd Class and 1,000 in non-airconditioned 3rd Class. The 3rd Class occupied the lowermost passenger deck while the First Class and Second Class accommodations and lobbies were on the deck above that and so it is the middle deck.

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Photo from a research of Gorio Belen in the National Library

Like the Sweet Faith before her, the Sweet RORO plied the premier Manila-Cebu route twice a week with a 22-hour sailing time which means a cruising speed of 18 knots for the 393-nautical mile route which is actually her design speed. It seems the policy of Sweet Lines is sail the ship at design speed because that is what they also did with the Sweet Faith. However, running a ship at 100% usually entails a ship’s not living very long. In 1988, Sweet RORO already had trouble with her engines specifically with her crankshaft as one report said and from that time on she already had difficulty sailing and if she did it is at reduced speed. The next year she was already laid up when she was less than 20 years of age. In 1990, she was sent to India for breaking up, a very short career when her two sister ships was still sailing in Greece up to the new millennium.

In 1987, Sweet RORO had a change of ownership but she was still sailing for Sweet Lines even then. She again became a Panamanian ship with the Dimerco Line SA which was the seller of her to Sweet Lines and to me that indicates a possibility that she was not fully paid for by Sweet Lines and so the seller re-acquired her. This was also about the same time that the Eduardo Lopingco group entered Sweet Lines and took over the management. With the entry of Lopingco additional ships came to the fleet but it turned out those were just chartered from the Hayashi Marine Company of Japan . Later, court cases arose after the company was not able to pay the charter to Hayashi Marine because court records show money was diverted by Lopingco to other ventures.

I wonder but I know financial troubles and mismanagement are ship killers especially when the needed maintenance of the ship are no longer made. And running ships at 100% power is parts-hungry and can result in damages to the engine in the long term especially when maintenance is not up to date. A report said that re-engining her was suggested to the company but nothing came out of it. This was already the time that the company was already headed on the way down after it seems that the founding Lim family has already lost control of the company if court filings are to be believed.

Whatever, the Sweet RORO was a big success in the Manila-Cebu route as actually Sweet Lines was a favorite of many especially the Bol-anons that until today many still remember her fondly (people are more attached then to their great liners unlike today that is why there were ship legends then including the Sweet RORO while now there is no such sentimentality anymore). However, it puzzles me why didn’t they extend the route to Tagbilaran given it was their origins and the ship had a long lay-over anyway in Cebu (was Tagbilaran port too shallow for her then?).

She was a fine ship ahead of her time. However, the sad part is she did not last long.

The Brief Career of Philippine President Lines (PPL) In The Inter-island Trade

Philippine President Lines. What a grandiose name! Obviously it took off from the American President Lines (APL) whose ships were named after the American Presidents. Similarly, Philippine President Lines (PPL) also named their ships after Philippine Presidents but not all (one reason is we don’t have many Presidents being a young republic). PPL was not as old as American President Lines being established only in the late 1950’s.

Philippine President Lines is an unusual shipping company in the Philippines because it took off and expanded so fast that in so short a time as in less than a decade it was already the biggest shipping company in the country. In the process, it even exceeded the venerable Compania Maritima or CM (and its subsidiary Maritime Company of the Philippines in the overseas trade) in the combined local and foreign trade (later, it was matched by Galleon Shipping Corporation, another company that also grew up very fast).

Philippine President Lines started in the local routes but they gave it up to a subsidiary after just four years and then concentrated on the foreign trade. Along the way, PPL acquired many ocean-going ships which sailed routes to the Far East, Japan and the US West Coast. In the process, the names of the ships of Philippine President Lines changed from “President” to “Liberty” to “Lucky”. Philippine President Lines died as a shipping company when their ships were already named “Lucky”. The company is still alive but its business now are by being ship agents and by engaging in ship manning.

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Photo credits: Philippine Herald and Gorio Belen

The first ship of Philippine President Lines was the FS-223 which was acquired from the US. By 1960, their inter-island passenger fleet was already set. The company was fortunate in this period because it was able to acquire former “AKL” ships which were already being disposed then by the US Navy. “AKL” ships were former “FS” ships that were retained by the US after the war for use of the US Navy in supplying out of the way small posts especially in the Pacific Ocean. “AKL” ships were supposedly better than its ex-”FS” sisters.

Philippine President Lines acquired their first ship in 1959 and this became the President Magsaysay in their fleet. In 1960, PPL acquired the former FS-220, also from the US and this became the first President Roxas. In 1960, too, their first “AKL” ship came, the former AKL-5 which became the President Quirino. In the same year, they also acquired the passenger-cargo ship Sirius from North Camarines Lumber Company which was not only involved in the logging and lumber business but also in shipping. This was the former FS-265 of the US Army.

In the same year 1960, Philippine President Lines also made a grand acquisition when then were able to acquire a former seaplane tender, the Onslow (AVP-48) which they then converted into a luxury liner with airconditioning and named as the President Quezon. The conversion took a year but when she was fielded she became the fastest liner in the Philippines at 18 knots, beating the old record-holder, the Don Julio of Southern Lines which was formerly a Ledesma Lines ship. In the same year, they were able to acquire another passenger-cargo ship which was named the Lake Taal which was not big enough to carry the name of a President.

In 1961, two former AKL ships from the US Navy reinforced their fleet. The AKL-1 and AKL-2 came which became the President Laurel and the President Osmena in their fleet, respectively. The two ships were the former FS-175 and FS-309 of the US Army (the US Army and not the US Navy operated the “FS” ships in the war). These former “FS” ships were all powered by versions of the 1,000-hp GM Cleveland engines which gave a maximum speed of 12 knots except for the President Laurel that was powered by an 800-hp Enterprise engine which was only capable of 10.5 knots.

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Photo credits: The Philippines Herald and Gorio Belen

The early routes of Philippine President Lines stressed Bicol ports and routes, three out of their five, in fact, in 1960. That was welcome development in the region because that time the Madrigal Shipping routes to Bicol were already flagging. The PPL’s Bicol route even reached Larap and J. Panganiban of Camarines Norte, the farthest Bicol ports from Manila and the diminutive Lake Taal was used in those ports as well as in the ancient port of Tandoc in Caramoan Peninsula.

By 1963, however, the inter-island operation of PPL were transferred to a subsidiary, the Philippine Pioneer Lines. Initially, the word “President” was dropped from the names of the ships but later the word “Pioneer” headed the name of the ships. Like the President Quezon which became Quezon became the Pioneer Iloilo. The number of ships increased but the routes to Bicol declined. Philippine Pioneer Lines then began to stress Cebu like most other shipping companies. Maybe they realized the traffic to Bicol ports was not really that much commensurate.

The significant addition to the Philippine Pioneer Lines fleet was the acquisition of the former Don Julio of Southern Lines which became the Pioneer Leyte in the Philippine Pioneer Lines fleet. Because of this, Philippine Pioneer Lines possessed the two fastest liners in the Philippine seas then.

This is the short tale of the inter-island career of Philippine President Lines. Its successor, the Philippine Pioneer Lines and its further successor, Galaxy Lines deserve a separate article maybe. Abangan!

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Photo credit: Manila Chronicle and Gorio Belen

The Southern Lines Inc.

Southern Lines Incorporated is one is the earliest shipping companies that was able to sail right after World War II. It was not a pre-war shipping company so it was not a recipient of replacement ships from the US. But as a Lopez-dominated company it was loaded in money, political connections and gravitas just like the other prominent Ilonggo shipping company, the De la Rama Steamship Company. Southern Lines Inc. was established in 1946, the first to be established in Iloilo City after the war. The founders of Southern Lines Inc. were not only prominent people in business and agriculture in Iloilo and Negros Oriental provinces but many were also founders of the pre-war Negros Navigation Company.

Southern Lines Inc. started with six ex-”F” ships and six ex-PT boats sourced from the US Navy. These were the vessels already here in the Philippines when the war ended and the US was simply loath to bring them back to the US as they no longer had use for them and so they just sold them cheap here. And the Lopezes simply were one the richest then in Iloilo especially their Chairman of the Board, Vicente Lopez Sr.

In 1947, Southern Lines Inc. was able to acquire two ex-”FS” from the Philippine Shipping Administration which was then in charge of selling the former US Navy ships that were passed to the Philippine government as aid and which were meant to augment our shipping fleet. These became the ferries Governor Wright and the Governor Smith. The first was assigned to the Manila-Butuan route and the latter was assigned to the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan route.

The ex-”F” ships was then assigned to the Visayas-Mindanao routes of the company. The company then had routes to Cebu, Zamboanga and Cotabato from Iloilo. They also had a Cebu-Zamboanga route and a Zamboanga-Cotabato route. The ex-”F” ships which were smaller than the ex-”FS” ships at 30.2 meters by 6.4 meters were actually better suited to regional routes.

In 1947, Southern Lines Inc. sold the Governor Wright to the French Government in Vietnam and bought another ex-”FS” ship which became the Governor Gilbert. This was no longer assigned to the Butuan route and instead she was assigned to the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan route. From hereon, aside from the regional routes, Southern Lines just concentrated on the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan (or Bacolod) route.

In 1948, Southern Lines Inc. acquired another ex-”FS” ship which became the second Governor Wright. However, this was sold to Philippine Steamship and Navigation Company (PSNC) in 1952 and in its place Southern Lines Inc. bought the Kilkenzie which was a former frigate of the Royal Navy that was converted into a cargo ship after the war. She was then converted in a passenger-cargo ship and she became the third Governor Wright of the company. This ship was actually built in the US and became part of the Lend-Lease program to the United Kingdom. In size this ship was almost the same in size as the ex-”FS” ships but she was a lot faster at 16 knots compared to the 12 knots maximum of the ex-”FS” ships.

The aforementioned ships became the fleet of Southern Lines Inc. The only further ship she acquired was the Don Julio which came from Ledesma Shipping Lines. The Don Julio was another ex-”FS” ship but re-engined. In liner routes, Southern Lines was heavily dependent on the former “FS” ships.

Southern Lines just had one purpose-built luxury liner, the Governor B. Lopez, a brand-new ship built by National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), a government-owned shipyard in Mariveles, Bataan. The ship was commissioned in 1961 and she was also the biggest ship ever of the company. The order of this ship was financed by a loan from the government-owned Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP).

To round out the fleet. Among the ex-”F” ships of the company were the Governor Forbes, Governor Wood, Governor Roosevelt, Governor Stimson and Governor Murphy. Some of their other ships were Governor Hayden and Governor Taft. This is not a complete list, however. They styled their ships as M/S, the abbreviation for Motor Ship. They did not use M/V or Motor Vessel.

Until their end in the mid-1960’s, Southern Lines Inc. basically sailed only to the Iloilo and Bacolod/Pulupandan. At times they made an Estancia call, too. They did not really branch out anywhere else except they had Visayas-Mindanao regional routes.

Southern Lines Inc. and De la Rama Steamship were the first shipping companies that held on routes to the premier cities of Western Visayas. They were followed by Ledesma Shipping Lines but this was a smaller company. When De la Rama Steamship later concentrated on foreign routes Southern Lines Inc. became the biggest liner company based in Western Visayas. There was no Negros Navigation Company liner routes yet and they were only doing Iloilo-Negros routes. Negros Navigation Company became a liner company when Ledesma Shipping Lines merged with them.

Maybe Southern Lines Inc. stymied the growth of Negros Navigation Company/Ledesma Shipping Lines or they had an agreement not to compete. It seems the latter only grew as a liner company when Southern Lines decided to quit shipping in the mid-1960’s. They forthwith then sold their ships to different shipping companies.

The Governor B. Lopez went to Carlos A. Go Thong & Co. in 1966 where she became the first Dona Ana. The Don Julio was sold to Philippine Pioneer Lines in 1966 too where she became the Pioneer Leyte. The third Governor Wright went to Sweet Lines Inc. in 1967 where she became the Sweet Sail. Meanwhile, Governor Taft and the Governor Murphy were transferred to Visayan Transportation Company. This might have been the successor to their regional operations.

That was the rather short career of Southern Lines Inc. which lasted only two decades. After her demise, Negros Navigation started growing fast. Like Southern Lines Inc., Negros Navigation Company only sailed the Iloilo and Bacolod routes for a long time.

Like in a relay race, it is as if the baton was passed.

[Photo Credit and Research Support: Gorio Belen]

[Database Support: Jun Marquez/Mike Baylon/PSSS]

The Sweet Grace and Sweet Faith and Their Impact for Sweet Lines

The “Sweet Grace” and “Sweet Faith” were two luxury liners that came for Sweet Lines in 1968 and 1970, respectively. These two liners had a lot to do in establishing Sweet Lines not only as a legit liner shipping company in the Philippines but also as one of the majors. As a liner company, Sweet Lines was a relative latecomer in this field as they only ascended to this in 1965. Their competitors Compania Maritima, Philippine Steam and Navigation Company (the partnership of Everett Steamship and Aboitiz Shipping), Escano Lines, William Lines , Carlos A. Go Thong & Co., Madrigal Shipping and Philippine President Lines started way early than them. But Sweet Lines’ rise was fast and this was helped by some astute moves like the purchase of “Sweet Grace” and “Sweet Faith” (this is the first “Sweet Faith”, a clarification since another liner of theirs also carried that name later). This was also helped by the acquisition of “Sweet Rose” locally and by the first “Sweet Home” from Italy.

Sweet Lines actually had pre-World War II origins as the Central Shipping Company. They originated in Bohol and they only changed their name in 1961. Actually, almost anyone who knew them always thought of them as a Bohol shipping company and so Bol-anons were always proud of them. After the war, the company grew to be a regional major with lines from Bohol to Northern Mindanao and Cebu and lines from Cebu to Leyte and Northern Mindanao. But they were not a multi-day liner company yet then as they were just sailing overnight and short-distance routes.

Then in 1965, the liner company General Shipping Company decided to quit local routes and just engage in shipping to the Far East after a board room squabble. With that, General Shipping began to dispose of their liners and franchises and half of those went to Sweet Lines (and the other half went to Aboitiz Shipping Corporation). Three of those liners were ex-FS ships and there is nothing noteworthy there but the fourth one was noteworthy. It was the former “General Roxas” (the second to carry that name in the fleet of General Shipping) and this was one of the two brand-new local-built liners from NASSCO in Mariveles, Bataan that was ordered in 1960 and 1961. The two were sister ships.

They were relatively big for a liner during those early days with the “General Roxas” at 84.7 meters by 12.3 meters. In cubic capacity she had 1,757 gross register tons and 968 net register tons. What was notable was they were already equipped with airconditioning when the very common ex-World War II ships then were not airconditioned like the ex-FS ships and bigger ex-C1-M-AV1. “General Roxas” became the “Sweet Rose” in the Sweet Lines fleet after coming over in 1965. For most of her career in Sweet Lines, this liner held the Manila-Catbalogan-Tacloban route for the company (yes, that was still an important liner route in those days; now that is bread and butter for the intermodal buses).

In 1968, from a soft loan by West Germany through the Philippine Government, Sweet Lines was able to order the “Sweet Grace”, a brand-new liner. This ship was built by Actiengessellschaft ‘Weser’ Seebeckwerpt in Bremerhaven, Germany with the ID IMO 6806951 at a cost of PhP 6.4 million (no typo there; now that money will just buy a high-end BMW). She was a cruiser with two masts, two passenger decks and a cargo boom at the front. The ship had a raked stem and a cruiser stern and a single center funnel. She measured 88.0 meters by 12.8 meters with a depth of 7.1 meters. Her cubic measures was 1,489 gross register tons and her load capacity was 1,590 deadweight tons. Her net tonnage was 690 and her passenger capacity was 18 persons in first class cabins and 650 persons in second class and third class.

The “Sweet Grace” was billed as a luxury liner (most liners then were actually converted cargo-passenger ships). She had an airconditioned lounge and dining salons, a lounge, a bar, piped-in music, TVs and movies – those were what defined a luxury liner then and especially the presence of airconditioning. The ship also had modern navigational aids and those were mainly radar and LORAN then. That is a take against the ex-FS ships which had no radar and which mainly relied on the old compasses and astrolabes. This liner had a single Atlas-MAK engine developing 2,950 horsepower which gave her a top speed of 15.5 knots. She was first deployed to the Manila-Catbalogan-Tacloban and Manila-Cebu routes.

In 1970, Sweet Lines acquired the luxury liner “H.P. Prior” from Det Forenede Dampskibs-Selskab A/S, which is more commonly known as DFDS, a major Danish and European shipping company. She was built by Helsingor Vaerft in Elsinore, Denmark in 1950 and she had the permanent ID IMO 5139131. She had two masts, three decks and a prominent single center funnel. The ship had a raked stem and a retrousse stern. She was bigger than Sweet Grace at 104.0 meters by 14.9 meters with 3,155 gross register tons. She also measured at 1,814 net register tons and 903 deadweight tons. This liner had a passenger capacity of 1,166 with 310 of that in cabins and the rest in airconditioned dormitories including third class. Her superstructure was practically untouched when she came here. She was equipped with two Helsingor-B & W engines with 7,620 horsepower which gave her a top speed of 20 knots, a speed she carried on even here, the first local liner to have that speed. She was our fastest liner in 1970, displacing from the throne the liner “Galaxy” of Galaxy Lines.

She was a luxury liner in the truest sense of the word and her comfort and amenities were higher than the liners which came before her. There was an airconditioned dining salon, an airconditioned economy cafeteria and all the passenger areas were airconditioned. For entertainment there were TVs and a mini-theater with movies (this was not common then), stereo music (also not common then) and a supper club (it was an sundown to midnight relaxation/lounging area with drinks, “pulutan” and entertainment by a band which was called a “combo” then). There were four third class dormitories which were all airconditioned (no, that was not an innovation by Aboitiz Transport System). And there was even a two-level sundeck which was popular for passengers for sightseeing, catching the breeze and for socializing. “Sweet Faith” defined what was a luxury liner then. She also defined what was “fast”.

In 1973, another European luxury liner came to Sweet Lines, the former “Caralis” of Tirrenea Spa di Navale of Italy which was built in 1957 by the Navalmeccanica in Castellamare, Italy. In the Sweet Lines fleet she became the second “Sweet Home”. She was a bigger liner than “Sweet Faith”, just as luxurious but not as fast. She was then paired by Sweet Lines with “Sweet Faith” in trying to dominate the Manila-Cebu route. The two were dedicated ships there and they sailed four times a week to Cebu and four times a week to Manila. Sweet Lines advertised them as the “Inimitable Mates”. “Sweet Home” measured 120.4 meters by 16.0 meters with 5,480 gross register tons (GRT) and 3,043 net register tons (NRT) in cubic measurements. Her NRT alone was already bigger than most of the liners of that era and that is just the measurement of the area dedicated to the passengers. The ship had a single Ansaldo engine of 6,200 horsepower which was good for 18 knots when new. Here she was only good for about 16 knots or so. “Sweet Home” had a passengers capacity of 1,200 which was probably the biggest in that era.

All these four liners had a big role in establishing Sweet Lines quick in the passenger liner field. There were other shipping companies that had bigger fleets than them. But what degraded them was that they were still reliant on the small, slow and vulnerable ex-FS ships even on the long routes like the routes to Davao and General Santos City (Dadiangas). These kind of ships were even still in use then in primary ports like Cebu and Iloilo while Sweet Lines began retiring their ex-FS ships from Manila routes when they had already these good liners. So Sweet Lines might not have had a big fleet then but their fleet spoke of quality. Actually if their primary liners then had a weakness it was that they can’t carry much cargo.

Sweet Lines liners were known for prompt departures while many other competitors gave priority to cargo. That means if there was still cargo to be loaded then the ship will still not leave even though it was already past departure time. And that was actually oppressive to most of the passengers as it can be hot in the third class sections of the ships especially during summers. Sweet Lines actually led in airconditioning in that liner era. So while Sweet Lines (not “Sweat Lines”) might have been gone now, many people still remember them for comfort and also the size of their liners then.

In the 1970’s, the fast cruiser liners came and that was the new flag bearer of that era offering shorter travel times in the major routes. Being old ships already when they came here “Sweet Faith” and “Sweet Home” did not last very long. Sweet Lines did not acquire fast cruiser liners like what William Lines, Sulpicio Lines and Negros Navigation did. “Sweet Grace” was still relatively new then but she was not fast in the first place. In the 1970’s, 18 knots already became the definition of what was “fast”.

I noticed in shipping that those who failed to follow the new paradigm lose their place in the hierarchy and that was what happened to Sweet Lines (and to some other liner companies like Compania Maritima, Philippine Steamship and Navigation Company and Aboitiz Shipping Company, Escano Lines and Madrigal Shipping). They tried a shortcut to the RORO era like what Carlos A. Gothong Lines Inc. did. But then maybe, both did not have enough steam for that leap. Other competitors also acquired RORO liners but they still also had their fast cruisers which Sweet Lines did not have. Still, overall, the 1970’s was a good decade for Sweet Lines. And to think they only came in the liner field in 1965. It was in the 1980’s when they started falling back. But then again that is another story….

[Photo Owner: Karsten Petersen]
[Research Support: Gorio Belen]
[Database Support: Jun Marquez/Mike Baylon/PSSS]

The Mabuhay 2 (SuperFerry 7)

The “Wilines Mabuhay 2” was the second liner in the luxury series “Mabuhay” of William Lines that was designed to compete with the luxury liners of Sulpicio Lines and the SuperFerries of Aboitiz Shipping. In terms of size, she was not as big as the great liners already existing then like the “Princess of the Orient”, the “Mabuhay 1” and the “Princess of Paradise” and neither was she that fast. In terms of match-ups, she was more the match of the SuperFerries in terms of size, speed (except for “SuperFerry 1”) and amenities. All around everybody called her simply as the “Mabuhay 2”.

The “Mabuhay 2” was born as the “Naminoue Maru” in Japan in 1980. Incidentally, the earlier “Naminoue Maru” built in 1962 also came to William Lines where she was known as “Tacloban City”. This “Naminoue Maru” of 1980 with the ID IMO 7920871 was built by Towa Shipbuilding in Shimonoseki, Japan for Arimura Sangyo or A” Line. She had raked stem and a cruiser stern, two masts, two funnels, a high bridge and two passenger decks. She had a deck crane at the front which was used for lifting container vans and two quarter ramps at the stern leading to a car deck so making her a RORO ship.

The ship measured 140.5 meters by 20.5 meters in length and breadth with 4,886 gross register tons as cubic measure and 3,119 deadweight tons in load capacity. She was powered by two Niigata diesel engines with a total of 15,600 horsepower and that gave her a top speed of 20 knots when new. She had a sister ship here, the former “Akitsuki” also from A” Line which also came to William Lines where she was known as the “Maynilad”.

The “Naminoue Maru” was sold by A” Line to William Lines in 1994. She was refitted in Singapore and a deck was added to her. The cargo boom at the front was also removed and three foredecks in a terraced design were also added and above that a promenade deck was made. This made the ship look great and modern. The mezzanine deck for sedans was also converted into added passenger amenities. With this renovation, her gross tonnage rose to 4,996 which looked to be an underestimation (her sister ship Maynilad had a gross tonnage of 6,538) and the net tonnage was 2,009 which seems to be an underestimation, too. The new passenger capacity of the ship was 2,015 which was significantly lower than sister ship “Maynilad” and that meant there were more passenger spaces and amenities aboard her. With more steel now and with 15 years of sailing mileage already her sustained top speed here was reduced to 17.5 knots which was about average for liners brought out in the 1990’s. Her container capacity was 110 TEUs. These container vans were aboard trailers and moved by trailer caddies so loading and unloading was fast.

In sailing for William Lines starting in 1994, she was assigned the Manila-Surigao-Butuan (Nasipit)-Tagbilaran-Manila route and within the same week she sailed a second route, the Manila-Tagbilaran-Cagayan de Oro-Tagbilaran-Manila route which were completely new sets of routes of William Lines. She was being made to run like the SuperFerries with just a few in-port hours. One unusual twist of their routes was the lack of intermediate ports of call and in obviating a Cebu docking. She was mainly a Northern Mindanao liner for William Lines.

She left Manila for Surigao every Thursday at 7am (which I remember was the earliest departure from North Harbor) and this was a direct route and that was unusual for Surigao ship. She left for Tagbilaran every Sunday at 12mn. For the direct Tagbilaran route she took 27 hours for the 429-nautical mile route. This was not at full speed as she arrives at early dawn anyway. For the 459-nautical mile Surigao route, she took 27 hours of sailing. Its Surigao route was the fastest then in the local shipping industry. Before the fielding of Mabuhay 2, William Lines did not have Surigao as a port of call. So that was actually an expansion in the route system of William Lines.

She had seven classes of accommodations – the Special Suite, Suite, Cabin for 2, Cabin for 4/6, Deluxe Cabin for 4/6/8, Deluxe Tourist and the usual and popular Economy. Her Deluxe Tourist was nice for a Tourist but that was the Tourist I remember that had the biggest gap from the next class Economy at almost double. The difference between First Class and Deluxe Cabin was the latter had only a wash and no toilet and bath. The Special Suite was bigger and more opulent than Suite. Economy was the only class without airconditioning and it was the cheapest.

All passage classes in the ship were entitled to free meals and there were three restaurants – the First Class restaurant, the Tourist restaurant and the Economy restaurant. The restaurants were located on the stern or rear of the ship. But like in the rest of the shipping industry Suite passengers can opt to take their meals in their cabins and it will be served there. The cabin telephone is available for that purpose along with other requests.

She had the usual amenities for liners like lounges, lobbies, front desk and promenade areas/viewing decks. Aside from viewing decks on the side which was limited to the open-air Economy class because she was fully built-up to the sides, she had that viewing deck above the terraced foredecks ahead of the bridge. She also had another viewing deck at the front ahead of the Tourist section and below the row of Suites. Those two were probably built as compensation for the lack of viewing platforms on the side because she had no outside passageways. The restaurants also functioned as additional lounging areas.She also had kiosks and a game room/arcade plus a grooming salon.

The “Mabuhay 2” did not sail long as a liner for William Lines b ecause the merger of William Lines, Gothong Lines and Aboitiz Shipping happened which resulted in the creation of the shipping line WG&A Philippines. This came about on the first day of 1996 although the agreements and preparations for the merger were already underway in the last quarter of 1995. In the new combined fleet, she was designated as the SuperFerry 7. In this new company she was given a new route route assignment which was a twice a week Manila-Tagbilaran-Iligan route and she left Manila every Thursday 12 midnight and every Monday at 9 in the morning.

In WG&A, her accommodation designations also changed. Enumerating low to high, it is now Economy, Tourist, Business Class for 2/4, Cabin for 2/4, Stateroom and Suite. Comparing rates for the common Tagbilaran port of call, the rates for all classes except two actually dropped. However, one purchases the Stateroom and the Suite as a room and not by individual. There was not much change inside the ship as the Mabuhay series was approximately equal in furnishings and comfort to the SuperFerry series.

One major change though in WG&A was all ships initially started with no free meals like in the SuperFerries before the merger and one had to pay a la carte. However, this caused such a furor and even outrage and a lot of protests. Passengers after all since the early times of shipping here were used to free meals and meals that led to contentment at that. I was witness to how noisy were the protests and I saw how the ship management caved in and gave free meals to the more vociferous ones. After that, it was like the dam had burst and there was no holding back in giving free meals again. But what I noticed was the rice portion was too small because they were selling extra rice! Still there were protests why there was no free soup! And no free desserts like in Sulpicio Lines! I can only watch in pity and amusement how harassed were the restaurant crews in the early days of the WG&A liners (I was a frequent traveler in those days and I happened to sail with SuperFerry 7 many times).

SuperFerry 7 did not sail long for WG&A and she actually was not assigned to any other route because of that. On March 26, 1997, an unfortunate incident happened and the ship was hit by fire while docked in Pier 4 in Manila North Harbor. There were no more passengers left as the ship had already finished discharging them. She was towed out of Pier 4 so that the fire will not leap to the other WG&A ships docked in Pier 4 like “SuperFerry 12” and the “Our Lady of Medjugorje”. However, the fire completely gutted her superstructure and she capsized near the ports after the pumps failed. Later, the formal investigation concluded it was an electrical fire that started the conflagration. In a few months. her insurer paid for the coverage of the ship and they even announced it in a local daily. The remains of SuperFerry 7 was then raised up and she was subsequently demolished by the salvors.

Mabuhay 2 only sailed here for three years. Very short. She was the first hull loss incident in the fleet of WG&A.

[Photo credits: Gorio Belen and Manila Chronicle]