In the Philippines, No-Name, Shoddy Ferries Have a Better Safety Record Than Internationally-Certificated Ferries

A candidate for Ripley’s “Believe It or Not”? That’s true and so better read on.

Yesterday, it was in the news that Christopher Pastrana, The Boastful is hosting the 41st Interferry Conference that will be held in Manila starting today, October 15. There will be many sponsors for that and it is usually attended by shipping owners, shipbuilders, marine engine makers, various suppliers and other entities connected to shipping to exchange notes and learn about the latest trends and products. By the way, Interferry is not the sole organizer of maritime conferences.

A news item said the FastCats of Pastrana can provide safe ferries as do the ferries of Starlite and the implication is because those are new. Well, not so fast as it is not just the newness of the ship that is a factor in safety. May I remind too that Pastrana lost the Maharlika Dos to capsizing and sinking near Panaon island in 2014 after its engines failed and his Maharlika Cuatro, though just nearby, did not come to its rescue. And Starlite Voyager grounded and reached BER status when it was on the way to a shipyard in 2011. Are they blaming now the oldness of their vessels that sank?

I was angry when Maharlika Dos capsized and sank in 2014 because Pastrana broke the 35-year record of Bicol steel-hulled ferries not sinking while sailing ever since the RORO Cardinal Ferry 2 of Cardinal Shipping came in 1979. The Northern Samar sank in 2006 in a storm but she was not sailing and was just moored in Tabaco port. This perfect record extends to Surigao Strait because no steel-hulled ferries ever sank there since Cardinal Ferry 2 came in 1980, a record that Maharlika Dos broke infamously.

And to think the eastern seaboard short-distance ferry routes are home to the some of the most shoddy ROROs in Philippine waters led by the Maharlika ships of Christopher Pastrana and the Millennium Uno of Millennium Shipping. Well, the ships of Bicolandia Shipping then were also not topnotch and are old. But no matter what these ferries don’t sink even though the eastern seaboard straits are among the most dangerous in the country. As I have said in an earlier article it is seamanship that carried them through. The seamen there would not let their ships sink because they know that among their passengers might be their kins, their friends, their school mates or somebody known to them. But Maharlika Cuatro‘s captain didn’t know that and so he let Maharlika Dos wallow in the ever-strengthening swells until it capsized. And now since he got new FastCats, Pastrana always boasts now about safety and misses no chance to deride the “lack of safety” of his rivals. What gall!

Before Pastrana or even Cusi of Starlite Ferries, another boastful owner, gets carried away let me state that going by the records and empirically there are a lot of ferry companies which are their rivals which have a perfect safety record, i.e. they did not lose ships to sinking. In Bicol, Sta. Clara Shipping, Penafrancia Shipping, Regina Shipping Lines and 168 Shipping Lines have never lost a ferry of theirs. That goes true to the defunct ferry companies that served Bicol like Cardinal Shipping, Newport Shipping, Badjao Navigation and the short-serving Luzvimin Ferry Services. Well, even Denica Lines have not lost a steel-hulled ferry so far.

Going to Quezon, the safety record of the decrepit-looking ships of Kalayaan Shipping have a perfect safety record as do the defunct Sta. Cruz Shipping. Alabat Shipping also has a perfect safety record as do Phil-Nippon Kyoei when they were still existing. Noting these ferry companies, I purposely omitted those that have short service records like Starhorse Shipping.

In Western Visayas, Milagrosa-J Shipping and Tri-Star Megalink both have perfect safety records even though Milagrosa-J Shipping regularly crosses the Sulu Sea which has rough seas and strong winds many months of the year. And to think their sea crafts are small and are already old. It is really in the seamanship.

Batangas shipping companies have no great safety record especially Besta Shipping. But I would like to point out that for a ferry company which has a fleet of over 30, Montenegro Shipping Lines lost only one ferry in 20 years even though they can be found almost anywhere in the Philippines including those that have rough seas. They only lost the Maria Carmela when somebody threw a cigarette butt into a copra truck and thereby igniting a conflagration which was rather unfortunate. And Montenegro Lines have some of the oldest ships hereabouts.

Zamboanga is home to some of ferries that will not look so clean internally and many are also old. But two sailing companies there, Ever Lines and Magnolia Shipping, probably the Number 2 and Number 3 there have perfect safety records as they have not lost a ship even in their freighters. And Sulu, Tawi-tawi and Celebes Sea have strong seas when there is a storm somewhere in eastern Philippines or when the monsoons are blowing hard. Minor shipping companies of Zamboanga like Sing Shipping and Ibnerizam Shipping also have perfect records. The defunct Basilan Lines/Basilan Shipping of the Alanos also did not lose a ship although their Dona Ramona was bombed in Lamitan City.

Mae Wess of Davao has not also lost a ship as do the KSJ Shipping of Surigao. And as far as I know, the currently operating ferry companies of Camiguin – Philstone Shipping, Davemyr Shipping, and Hijos de Juan Corrales have not lost a ship too and it seems that also goes true for the defunct P.N. Roa and and Jade Sea Express. In Panguil Bay, Daima Shipping has not also lost a ship even though their Our Lady of Mediatrix was burned because of the firebombing of two Super 5 buses aboard her in 2000.

In Cebu, for all the size of their fleet Lite Ferries may not lost a vessel (was the Sta. Lucia de Bohol lost at sea?). FJP Lines/Palacio Shipping, defunct now, also has a perfect safety record. There are other defunct shipping companies of Cebu which has not lost a ship through accident and that includes VG Shipping, Roly Shipping/Godspeed, Kinswell Shipping, Jadestar Shipping, Goldenbridge Shipping, Maayo Shipping, Cuadro Alas Navigation, PAR Transport plus many smaller ferry companies. In the recent era, Gabisan Shipping are known for safety and the ability to “read” the waves and have not yet lost one.

If I go by routes, there was not a ferry lost in Roxas-Caticlan and Dapitan-Dumaguete even though their seas can sometimes be rough. No steel-hulled ferry was ever lost in any route in Bicol too except for the Blue Water Princess 2 which is a Quezon ferry going to Masbate and the Rosalia 2, a Cebu craft going to Cataingan, Masbate. There are many, many other routes in the country which has not seen a ship sink even though they are not using a new ship. It is all in the seamanship really. To say a new ships is “safer” is just like claiming a new car will not be involved in a collision.

Some of our HSC companies too are very safe. Oceanjet, the Number 1 now in HSCs, has not lost a ship ever and they did not always use new crafts. Weesam Express also has a perfect record. Even the defunct Bullet Express, the fastcrafts of the Viva Shipping Lines combine and the fastcrafts of A. Sakaluran have perfect safety records. The are a lot of other HSC companies which had perfect records but their service record was short like Star Crafts. Not included here is SuperCat which has lost one.

And which brings me to our liners which in the recent years are internationally-certificated, have P&I insurance and are mostly spic-and-span but unfortunately have a bad safety record. In the last 20 years, WG&A/CFC lost SuperFerry 3, SuperFerry 6 and SuperFerry 7, all to fire and Dona Virginia and Our Lady of Banneux due to grounding. Aboitiz Transport System (ATS) also lost the SuperFerry 14 to a terrorist act and the St. Gregory The Great to grounding. Sulpicio Lines lost the Princess of the Stars and Princess of the Orient to capsizing and lost the Princess of the World, Philippine Princess and the Iloilo Princess to fire and the Princess of the Pacific to grounding. Negros Navigation also lost the St. Francis of Assisi to fire.

Between the end of the World War II and 1995 I know of 75 (that is seventy-five) liners which were lost and mainly at sea. That is 75 in only 30 years! Can anybody believe that? So how can I be impressed by liners and international certificates in safety? Or in their being spic and span? The records say otherwise. And believe me I can easily name the 75 as I have my own database about maritime hull losses. This 75 does not even include regional ships like the Boholana Princess which was an overnight ship when she was lost.

The Don Juan and Cebu City were brand-new ships when they were fielded in the Philippines. But they sank in collisions at night. So Pastrana and Cusi be better warned by their boastfulness of their new ships. They better be more humble before shipping companies which have not ever lost a ship.

Newness of a ship is not a guarantee of anything except in shininess.

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Photo credit: Masahiro Homma

The MV Ma. Angelica Grace

The Ma. Angelica Grace is a unique but hard-luck ship. Of Korean design and origin she had that extended scantling already making for a bigger passenger accommodation although she is basically an LCT. Following Korean innovation she is faster like a conventional ferry and her hull is not exactly flat but more like that of a conventional ship. She is really speedy for an LCT (17.5 knots!) because she is overpowered.

When she first came into the country in 2009 and sailed for Rapal Inter-island Shipping, I was surprised because I knew the route she is embarking on is bound to end in doom. That is the Batangas-Romblon-Masbate route. Sometimes, I wonder why some shipping companies seem not to study failures in the past. But maybe then they might have a connection or attachment in the place which is hard to quantify.

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The route linking Batangas and Masbate was marginal even in the heydeys of Viva Shipping Lines and to think it was a long-held route by them. The competing Lucena-Masbate route is even superior from the passenger and rolling cargo point of view. This is so because since rates in the sea is far higher than rates in the land then what makes sense for them is a short sea crossing, if possible and the Lucena-Masbate route is far shorter than the Batangas-Masbate route. In fact that route was held longer by Viva Shipping Lines (up until their demise) that the Batangas-Masbate route.

But then the entry of the basic, short-distance ferry-RORO to Masbate from Pilar trumped both Batangas and Lucena since that route is very short. Suddenly, the crossing of trucks to Masbate became affordable (thence, only a select few dare pay the hefty rolling rate to Lucena or Batangas). Later, with the ferry company encouraging and supporting the bus companies, soon the rolling of buses also commenced and that impacted a lot on the choice of the passengers. Suddenly, the direct bus crossing to Masbate was already their default choice.

In the Batangas-Romblon section, Rapal Inter-island Shipping will also not have its way. Montenegro Lines has a headstart there and CSGA Ferry (MV Princess Annavell) was also doing the route. And that is aside from the ferry from Lucena of Kalayaan Shipping. Soon the successor of MBRS Lines (which held the Manila-Romblon routes then) will come back as the Romblon Shipping Lines and operate the liner Mary The Queen. Romblon does not have a big population anyway nor such great economic activity to support so many ships. So when the Maria Angelica Grace came into the picture I know they will go out of the picture soon (pun intended) and I was not mistaken.

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Maria Angelica Grace was first known as the A Rim Car Ferry No. 2 of the A Rim Car Ferry of South Korea. She was built by Ilheung Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. in Mokpo yard in South Korea. She has two masts, two funnels, a half passenger deck and a car deck with a single bow ramp as access and she has a square end stern. Like most LCTs, her access to the passenger deck is through stairs at the very end of the ship.

This modern LCT measured 56.6 meters in length over-all, a beam of 10.0 meters and a depth of 2.8 meters. Her dimensional weight are 416 gross tons and 200 in net tonnage and the ship’s DWT is 152 gross tons. She is powered by twin Caterpillar engines with a total of 2,550hp (that is High Speed Craft range!) which gave her a top speed of 17.5 knots which was indeed very fast for an LCT.

Maria Angelica Grace had a limited passenger accommodation but it had airconditioning which might have been original in Korea. However, she was fitted with bunks since her route to Romblon and Masbate are overnight routes. She also has a few seats and in the rear there is a small canteen and mess. That facility is needed by ferries doing overnight routes.

When she quit her Sibuyan Sea route she was then leased to Surigao to carry not passengers but metallic ores. I wonder why they did not just apply for other routes because later it was found out that metallic ores loaded into the deck is toxic for LCTs as the ores easily corrode the deck and since it is a deck exposed to rain the water combined with the ores will result in leaching.

Maria Angelica Grace was pulled out after two years in Surigao and her shiny white paint was already gone and the deck corroded. She was leased to Mandaue Transport which has Cargo RORO LCT operations from Cabahug wharf in Mandaue, Cebu to Tagbilaran, Bohol. The MARINA of Region 7, however advanced some conditions. They demanded a new coat of paint and repairs has to be made to the car deck. Work was being done to her when we visited her. Her bunks were also being removed. MARINA Region 7 is rather strict in the rule the Cargo RORO LCTs should not have passenger accommodations. They do not want any passenger revenue accruing on the sly.

With these met she soon began sailing as the third LCT of Mandaue Transport in the Mandaue-Tagbilaran route carrying rolling cargo (i.e. vehicles). However, her career with Mandaue Transport did not last long how; it was actually very short. In a few months, she capsized (but not sunk) right in Cabahug wharf while loading. The strong wash of a High Speed Craft passing capsized her. Maybe the time that happened her load was unbalanced and maybe it was a vulnerable point as Cabahug wharf is in the northern narrows of Mactan Channel and High Speed Crafts pass just about a hundred meters away.

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Maria Angelica Grace was refloated and she was towed to Colorado Shipyard in Tayud, Cebu. However, years have passed and yet no work was being done on her. That was still the situation when Philippine Ship Spotters Society (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) members visited Colorado Shipyard. She looked rusty again and maybe it is even more rusty in the car deck. With her capsizing, she also suffered damages in the engine room and bridge for sure.

I do not know what is her future. What I know is her capsizing resulted in the restrictions in the the speeds of the High Speed Crafts inside Mactan Channel.

I just rue such fate of a once fast LCT.

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Photo Credits: Nowell Alcancia, John Carlos Cabanillas, Mike Baylon, Philippine Ship Spotters Society (PSSS)