The Danica Joy

The Danica Joy is a ship that has no number actually and is different from the lost Danica Joy-2 which capsized in Zamboanga Port while unloading its cargo. The Danica Joy is owned by the Aleson Shipping Lines of Zamboanga and she is actually the oldest ship in their fleet now after the retirement of the cruiser ferries Estrella del Mar and Neveen. But the Danica Joy is not really the second ship of Aleson Shipping. It just so happened that she was able to outlast her contemporaries in the fleet of Aleson Shipping Lines and for me that is already a feat on its own. Counting, she will be celebrating her silver anniversary (25 years) this year (2017) in the company.

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The ship Danica Joy was a former ferry in Japan like most of our steel-hulled ferries. She was built by Nakamura Shipbuilding & Engine Works in Yanai yard in 1972 as the ferry Nakajima of the Nakajima Kisen K.K with the IMO Number 7852414. Her route then was to Matsuyama, the biggest city in the Shikoku island of Japan. However, when the new Nakajima arrived for the company in 1994, she was retired and sold to the Philippines specifically to Aleson Shipping Lines which then proceeded to refit and remodel her in Zamboanga City into an overnight ferry with bunks and she was henchforth renamed into the Danica Joy.

The Danica Joy was the first “big” RORO of Aleson Shipping. “Big” because she was not really big in the true sense. It just so happened that she was bigger than the other ROROs of the Aleson fleet then. In the 1990’s Aleson Shipping was already converting into ROROs like most shipping lines then in the country. However, the sizes of the ROROs in the fleet of Aleson Shipping then was the size of the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs with the exception of the Danica Joy (the Aleson Zamboanga, a cruiser ferry, and an earlier acquisition of Aleson Shipping from Carlos A. Gothong Lines was actually bigger than her but maybe not in Gross Tonnage, unofficially).

The external measurements locally of the Danica Joy is 48.0 meters Length, 11.3 meters Beam and 3.7 meters Depth and officially she has 493 in Gross Tonnage (GT) which is just the same as her Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) in Japan although additional structures were built into her that should have increased her GT. Her Net Tonnage (NT) is 245 and her load capacity is 218 Deadweight Tons. She is powered by two Daihatsu engines with a total of 2,000 horsepower giving her a sustained top speed of 14 knots when she was still new. The Call Sign of Danica Joy is DUJ2051 but she has no MMSI Number.

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The ship has a steel hull with car ramps at the bow and stern leading to a single car deck. She has two masts and two funnels. Her stem is raked and her stern is transom. Danica Joy has two passenger decks in a combination of bunks and seats. She has a Tourist accommodation aside from Economy and the ferry’s passenger capacity is 448 persons. This ferry has actually many sister ships in the Philippines. Among those are the Lite Ferry 6 of Lite Ferries, the former Salve Juliana of MBRS Shipping Lines which came here earlier in 1990, the Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2, also both of Lite Ferries and Danilo Lines before (as the former Danilo 1 and Danilo 2). Both the Danilo ships also came into the country before her.

Danica Joy‘s first established route was Zamboanga City to Sandakan in Sabah, Malaysia. This was a response to the launching of the sub-regional grouping BIMP-EAGA (Brunei Darussalam-Indonesia-Malaysia-Philippines East Asia Growth Area) in 1994. It was a ship not only used for cargo which were mainly what is called as “barter goods” in the Philippines but also for carrying people and many of those were migrant workers and visitors to kins in Sabah. On that year, Danica Joy was the only Philippine ferry that has an international route. However, Sandakan was not the exclusive route of Danica Joy as she was also used in local routes.

In 1996 with the arrival of the bigger and faster Lady Mary Joy (which is a dead ship now and has no number too and is a different ship from the current Lady Mary Joy 1), Danica Joy became mainly a local ship and used on the long routes of Aleson Shipping which means Jolo and Bongao but not Pagadian. She was a valuable ship for Aleson Shipping in these long routes, a workhorse in fact because Danica Joy has no pair until the Danica Joy-2 arrived in 1998. The two had no relievers until 2004 when the Kristel Jane-3 arrived (this ship is still in the Bongao, Tawi-tawi route). She and her namesake Danica Joy-2 which is sometimes mistaken for her shouldered on in these routes until Trisha Kerstin-1 arrived in 2006 and Trisha Kerstin 2 arrived in 2008.

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Danica Joy is the ship fronted by the truck (in Zamboanga Port)

But this long shouldering took a toll on Danica Joy (and also Danica Joy-2 a little later) and her engines began to get unreliable after nearly 15 years of local sailing added to her 22 years of sailing in Japan. However, the second-generation owners of Aleson Shipping who seem to be more aggressive than the first generation (good for shipping!)pulled out their checkbook and ordered the rehabilitation of Danica Joy (and to Danica Joy-2 also later). Danica Joy hid for a length of time in Varadero de Recodo and when she reappeared she was a spunky and reliable ship once more. And this is not what is not understood by those who do not know shipping. That when money is poured into a veteran ship, the ship becomes good and reliable once more like her former self.

The next established route of Danica Joy after her re-emergence was the blossoming Dapitan-Dumaguete route to pair with pioneering ship of Aleson Shipping there, the Ciara Joie. As a true overnight ferry, her bunks were appreciated in that route because many of the passengers there already came from distant places like Zamboanga City and having absorbed already the bumps and lack of sleep in the 11-hour ride from that distant city and you still have 8 more hours to go in the Dumaguete-Bacolod sector. One would definitely want to stretch in a bunk rather than take the seats of a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO.

The move of Aleson Shipping to field Danica Joy in that route proved to be good and she was successful there. Nearly a decade after she was refurbished, Danica Joy is still a reliable ship until now. From the time she was fielded the Danica Joy was the biggest ship in the route although the Super Shuttle Ferry 12 of Asian Marine Transport Corporation is almost as big as her. That was true until recently whenthe FastCat of Archipelago Philippine Ferries arrived. But then still her competitors in the route has no bunks to offer the passengers (basically, it is only Aleson Shipping that offers bunks in that route with their other overnight ferry-ROROs that sometimes spell the Danica Joy in the route).

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Danica Joy in Pulauan Port of Dapitan

It seems that the Dapitan-Dumaguete route is a perfect fit for Danica Joy. The 44 nautical miles of the route does not seem to stress the engines of Danica Joy which the last time I saw her was still practically smokeless. Her size is also a perfect match especially in the peak season when added capacity is needed. Her cargo deck which can take in 12 long trucks (more if there are smaller vehicles) can carry the many distributor trucks and fish carriers that teem in the route.

In my eye, the Danica Joy is still fit to sail for many more years and I expect to see her in the route for a considerable more time. I just hope the campaigners against old ferries who have their own vested interests won’t have their way because if they triumph that would mean the end of the 45-year old Danica Joy and that is a shame because she is still a good and reliable ship.

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A Quartet of Sister Ships

The Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2 of Lite Ferries, the Maria Helena of Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. and the Danica Joy of Aleson Shipping Lines share one thing in common which is a common hull design making them all as sister ships. The four were built in different yards and in different years and they have different engines but they share the same superstructure too making them similar from afar though many do not realize that immediately. They also sailed at one time not far from each other and some might even have met in Dumaguete port.

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Among the four, it was Omogo which came first to the Philippines in 1987 from Setonaikai Kisen KK of Hiroshima, Japan to become the Danilo 1 of Danilo Lines. The Sensui Maru of the same Japan company followed in 1989 and she became the Danilo 2 of Danilo Lines. Actually, the two are among our early ferries, a product of the right bet of Danilo Lines on ROROs when they connected the ports of San Carlos and Toledo across the Tanon Strait dividing Negros and Cebu islands. When Danilo Lines was acquired by Lite Shipping Corporation, Danilo 1 became the Lite Ferry 1 and Danilo 2 became the Lite Ferry 2. Officially, however, the two ships still belong to Danilo Lines which was not dissolved yet but everybody knows now they are under Lite Ferries and other ships of Lite Ferries periodically relieve them now in the route and sometimes the two ships are assigned other routes of Lite Ferries.

The third to arrive in the country was the Danica Joy and she was one of the early ROROs of Aleson Shipping Lines when she came in 1994. The last to arrive was the Maria Helena which only came in 2004 after a stint in China with the Qingdao Ferry. Belonging to different companies, the quartet of sister ships have different home ports, the Lite Ferries in Cebu, Danica Joy in Zamboanga and the Maria Helena in Batangas.

Among the four, three were built in 1969 which are the two Lite Ferries and the Maria Helena. The Danica Joy, meanwhile was built in 1972. The Lite Ferry 1 was built by Kanda Zosensho in Kure yard, Japan. The Lite Ferry 2, though having the same owner in Japan was built by a different shipyard in the same year. She was built by Matsuura Tekko in Higashino yard, Japan.

Meanwhile, the Maria Helena was built as the Yanai by Nakamura Shipbuilding and Engineering Works in Yanai yard, Japan for Boyo Kisen KK of Yanai, Japan. She went to China as the Lu Jiao Du 1 in 1993. Lastly, the Danica Joy was built as the Nakajima by Nakamura Zosen in Matsue yard, Japan. [Note: Danica Joy is the same ship as the earlier Danica Joy 1.]

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Photo by James Gabriel Verallo

Lite Ferry 1 has the permanent ID IMO 7005530. Lite Ferry 2 has the permanent ID IMO 6926969. That means her keel was laid ahead of Lite Ferry 1. Maria Helena is also identified as IMO 7535274 and Danica Joy is IMO 7852414. I do not know why the IMO Numbers of Maria Helena and Danica Joy are out of sequence.

The four are not basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs but belongs to the next class higher which are over 40 meters in length (in fact, just below 50 meters LOA). The distinguishing characteristic of the four is the rectangular box at the front or bow of the ship which serves as protection for rain, sea splash and rogue waves. The four looks rectangular from the sides. All except Danica Joy have full two passenger decks here and a single car deck (Danica Joy just have a partial second passenger deck).

The car decks of the four have three lanes and four trucks or buses can be accommodated in each lane (more if it is sedans, SUVs or jeeps). Originally and until now, the four have RORO ramps at the bow and at the stern although all basically just use the stern ramp now for handling rolling cargo hence they dock stern-wise.

All the four have combined bunks and seats so all can be used either as a short-distance RORO or as an overnight ship. All have an airconditioned Tourist class and the usual open-air Economy class. The size of the Tourist class varies among the four, however and so do the passenger capacity. Maria Helena has the smallest passenger capacity among the four at only 310 passengers.

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Maria Helena by John Carlos Cabanillas

The gross tonnage (GT) of Maria Helena might be a little bloated at over 1,000, a pattern I noticed among ships that passed through China (if it is compared to its Japan GT). Meanwhile, the GT of the three others might be a little understated because it was practically unchanged from the Japan GT (when scantlings were added to ships). Until now, the Philippines have no true reliable GT figures (because MARINA does not know how to compute that?).

The four sister ships are equipped with a pair of Daihatsu marine main engines. Three have a total of 2,000 horsepower but the Lite Ferry 2 only has a total of 1,700 horsepower making it the slowest at 13 knots when new. Lite Ferry 1 was capable of 13.5 knots when new while the two others were capable of 14 knots when new. Realistically, they are only capable now of 11-12 knots given their age and the additional metal. Some might even sail at just 10 knots given the demand of the route.

The quartet all have raked bows and transom sterns. All have two masts and two funnels at the sides. However, only Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2 have stern passenger ramps which is a trademark of Cebu overnight ferries. This design does not interfere with the car or cargo loading of the ship. This is not possible with Maria Helena because she has no full scantling.

The four have no permanent assigned routes. The nearest to having a permanent route is the Danica Joy in the Dumaguete-Dapitan (Pulauan) route where she was the first short-distance RORO with bunks. Montenegro Lines always rotate their ships but for a time Maria Helena was always in the Bogo-Cataingan route. Meanwhile, Lite Ferries always rotate their ships every so few months.

These four are all starting to advance in years now. However, all are still very reliable. Their metal seems to be still good too. So I don’t see them quitting anytime soon as all are still good ferries especially in the short routes, the routes that loads a dozen vehicles and a few hundred passengers.

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If there is anything that will kill them it will be the wrong proposal being pushed now by some quarters to retire ferries that are over 35 years in age. As if safety in ships is determined by the age of the ships when empirically it is not. Actually, it is vested interests and not just concern for safety that is fueling that push.

Anyway, I hope to see this quartet continue to sail for many more years. They are still capable ferries.

Note: It is possible that Ruby-1 or Ruby-2 of Alexis Shipping that plied the Batangas-Calapan route is also a sister ship of the four. But they are already missing.

The Super Shuttle Ferry 12

When I look at Super Shuttle Ferry 12 of the Asian Marine Transport Corp. (AMTC) I know there is an anomaly there, and no offense meant. To me, she looks like as an extended version of the basic, short-distance ferry RORO — almost the same breadth at 10 meters, the single passenger deck with the bridge on the same level, the same single car deck accessed by a single, stern RORO ramp and not by a bow ramp(and this is another small difference). The only major differences are she has a length of over 50 meters and she has two side funnels which signifies twin engines. And because of that she is also faster than a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO.

Another significance I see in Super Shuttle Ferry 12 is she was assigned the Dumaguete-Dapitan route connecting Negros and Mindanao ever since she arrived in the Philippines in 2007 while other ferries of AMTC are often rotated (maybe except for some of their Camiguin ferries). And when she first arrived in that route she was probably the best ship in there aside from being the newest if computed from Date of Built (DOB).

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Photo Credit: James Gabriel Verallo

The Super Shuttle Ferry 12 was built in 1983 as the Ferry Tarama of the Tarama Kaiun shipping company. Her builder was Usuki Tekkosho in Usuki, Japan and she was given the permanent ID IMO Number 8217817. That number means her keel was laid in 1982 but she was completed in 1983. Tarama Islands, from what I understand is in the Okinawa group, a place of rough seas and high waves and maybe Ferry Tarama‘s exceptional depth (for her size) of 6.0 meters was meant to cope with that.

Ferry Tarama‘s external dimensions are 53.0 meters length over-all (LOA), 48.0 meters length between perpendiculars (LBP) and a breadth of 10.4 meters. Her dimensional weights are 324 in gross tonnage (GT) and 220 in net tonnage (NT) with a deadweight tonnage (DWT) of 260 tons. She has 2 x 1,350-horsepower Niigata engines (for a total of 2,700 horsepower) which gave her a top speed of 14 knots when new (which is significantly higher than the 10-11 knots of the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs).

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Photo Credit: Jonathan Bordon

This ship has a steel hull with a stern ramp as access to the car deck. She has two masts, a single passenger deck, a bulbous stem and a raked transom stern. Her bridge is not elevated and is located as the same level of the passenger deck. Her sides are high and maybe that was designed for the high waves of the Ryukyus. The ship has full scantling. I also noticed that her masts are very high.

As a side note, Ferry Tarama was built in the same shipyard as the Ferry Izena, a ferry of Izena island in the same Okinawa group, in the same year. Ferry Izena became the Kristel Jane 3, a Zamboanga-Bongao ship of Aleson Shipping Lines. The two ships have some resemblance including the raked stern although they are not sister ships and Kristel Jane 3 is a twin-passenger-deck ship although she is actually shorter than Ferry Tarama . And that is another proof why I think Super Shuttle Ferry 12 is an anomaly. Most of the ferries with her length have twin passenger decks.

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After 24 years of service in Okinawan waters, Ferry Tarama was acquired by Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) of Cebu. Not much was altered in her superstructure except to extend the passenger deck so she can have an Economy Class. With that her gross tonnage should have increased but it remained at 324. The airconditioned Japan accommodations then became the Tourist Class and so she is became a two-class, short-distance ferry-RORO with sitting accommodations.

Immediately, she was fielded in the Dumaguete-Dapitan route of Asian Marine Transport Corporation which was then beginning to boom and which needed a bigger ship to handle the sometimes rough habagat (southwest monsoon) waves coming from Sulu Sea. This straight dividing Negros island and Mindanao is also sometimes rough during the amihan (northeast monsoon) season or whenever there is a storm somewhere in the eastern seaboard of the country. When she was fielded there she was the fastest ferry in the route.

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When she came and their Ciara Joie was outclassed, their competitor Aleson Shipping Lines fielded the newly-refurbished (in the engine department) Danica Joy in able to match Super Shuttle Ferry12. Now Super Shuttle Ferry 12 is not only up against those two ships of Aleson Shipping (sometimes a Trisha Kerstin ship replaces Danica Joy) but also against the re-engined Reina Veronica of Montenegro Shipping Lines. Danica Joy or a Trisha Kerstin (there are three ships with that name) can match Super Shuttle Ferry 12 in speed as they are not basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs and they are twin-engined too. Also a new competitor against her in the route is the dangerous, newly-arrived FastCat of Archipelago Ferries Philippine Corporation (I just did not name the ferry specifically as they always rotate ships).

Super Shuttle Ferry 12 has one round trip a day in the Dumaguete-Dapitan route. Her Dumaguete departure is at 5pm and her Dapitan departure is at 5am. As a RORO ship in a short-distance ferry route, her cargo mainly consists of vehicles. She takes a little less than 4 hours for the 44-nautical mile route. This route is a profitable run for the ROROs there as there is enough load especially of trucks which are mainly trader or distributor trucks and fish carriers. And the charge on trucks in the country is really high as unlike in Europe the local rates are not computed by lane-meters.

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Super Shuttle Ferry 12 is a very reliable ship and almost never misses her schedule except when she is on drydock and that happens every two years. Her last drydock was on the summer of 2015 in Mandaue. She was there when we visited the Asian Marine Transport Corporation wharf in Mandaue but we can’t get aboard as her car deck was being painted.

She is now back on her route again. I think she would sail her route for a long time more unless she is assigned another route but this is unlikely as speed and a little size is needed there, attributes that Super Shuttle Ferry 12 has.

She is a good fit there but she better be wary of the new but dangerous FastCat which is much faster, has bigger capacity than her and sails three round trips a day.

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Photo Credit: Janjan Salas