RORO Developments in Northern Cebu

In northern Cebu, easily the most busy is Hagnaya port which is so known that it even eclipses its town of San Remigio in name recall in many people. This is so because tourism to Bantayan island has really boomed as it became one of the getaways of Cebuanos. And besides the island is also known for dried fish especially danggit and table eggs which they send to their capital Cebu City.

Super Shuttle Ferry 26, Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and LCT Island II

Hagnaya port

Two shipping companies duke it out in the route to Bantayan — Island Shipping Corporation and the Asian Marine Transport Corporation (Super Shuttle Ferry). The two uses short-distance ferry-ROROs and LCTs to connect to the island. Recently, the bus company Ceres Liner started their run to the island with it loading the buses aboard the ROROs.

A new development in Hagnaya port was the recent start of the Hagnaya to Cawayan, Masbate RORO route of Island Shipping Corporation using an LCT. This is like reopening of the old route to Masbate of the motor boats of yore that also originated from Hagnaya. This new route is meant to compete with the ROROs emanating from the Polambato port of Bogo, Cebu which connect to Cawayan and Cataingan, Masbate. Whether this route will last remains to be seen because of other developments.

New Maya port

New Maya port

And this development I am talking about is the nearing completion of the new Maya port at the northernmost tip of Cebu island which is part of Daanbantayan town. This a RORO port and it will have the advantage of being nearer to Masbate and hence a shorter distance will have to be traveled by the RORO. If the new route offers cheaper RORO rates then Polambato and Hagnaya ports will lose. If not, then the only advantage then of the new route might be a little bit of a shorter transit time and in experience that doesn’t matter much as a decision point for patrons. To remain in contention, maybe the competing ROROs in Polambato and Hagnaya might have to match rates with compensation for the less kilometers traveled by land from Metro Cebu, the main point of origin of the trucks.

Polambato port not only serves Masbate. Actually, it was first built as a RORO connection to Leyte island. A new development there is the recent entry of E.B. Aznar Shipping in the Bogo-Palompon route, a route badly served by Asian Marine Transport Corporation since they have long stoppages when their ferry is not capable of sailing due to mechanical troubles. With that the Ceres Liner bus to Leyte stops and truckers to northwestern Leyte and Biliran will need to find an alternative. This irregularity of service was actually alleviated when Medallion Transport started a Cebu-Palompon service using a RORO and unlike Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated which anteceded them in the route, their RORO is perfectly capable of rolling cargo since it does not have chopped ramps.

Port of Polambato

Polambato port (Photo by jaedee021)

I always wondered how come RORO shipping from northern Cebu to Leyte did not develop like the ROROs to Bantayan when the northwestern district of Leyte has five towns to the three of Bantayan island. Maybe one of the reasons is there might not be enough tourism. Regarding their agricultural produce, maybe it is supplied more to the rest of Leyte and Biliran. Bringing them across the sea to Cebu is additional expense and unless the price differential is high then there is no point in bringing it to Cebu.

There is a resort off Leyte that is slowly being famous now, the Kalanggaman island. But in development as a resort, it seems it is still a long way off that of the very well-known Malapascua island off the northernmost tip of Cebu. Speaking of this island, there are only motor bancas going there which use the old Maya port which is not a RORO port. I do not know if bigger vessels will be used to Malapascua when the new Maya port is finished but probably not since that will require an equally-capable port in the resort island.

Old Maya port

Old Maya port

In the old Maya port there is also a regular motor banca to Esperanza, Masbate. There are also motor boats from Bogo to Cawayan and Placer in Masbate. I just do not know how much those will be impacted when the new Maya port opens. Viewing it from the time the ROROs arrived, a lot of business has already been taken by the ROROs from the motor bancas especially since there is not much need now of point-to-point services to Masbate towns since the roads in Masbate have already improved a lot and so there are already more vehicles rolling.

One thing sure, the ports, the ROROs and the routes in northern Cebu are still evolving. I was anticipating before that it will serve as an alternative to Manila of the people of that part of Cebu rather than backtracking to Cebu City. However, I noticed that the connecting rides still do not mesh very well and it is obvious it is not geared to that. Moreover, there is still not that visible savings in fare. Additionally, the people there are not used to long bus rides whereas one can recline in the liner from Cebu for all they want and have free meals too and good toilets and baths.

Will there be route in the future from northern Cebu direct to the Bicol mainland via Bulan port? Once this port had a Palacio ferry from Cebu City. Or even a route to Calbayog in Samar? This route will be nearer than the one from Cebu City. Now these remain to be seen but I won’t be surprised if those materialize in the future.

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A Perfect Overnight Ferry?

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The ferry Filipinas Cebu of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated (CSLI) has always impressed me. Beautiful ship. Beautiful lines. Looks sleek. Looks modern, too. Her designers should be commended for designing a ship that does not look stodgy.

The ship is 81.5 meters by 14.0m by 4.9 meters with a Gross Tonnage (GT) of 2,726 which is higher than her Japan GT of 2,323. Maybe because of the additional scantling added in the bridge or navigation deck. With those dimensions, she has a maximum passenger capacity of 642 which is median nowadays for the bigger overnight ships. Some 1,689 net tons is available for revenue from passengers and cargo. The ratio of the net tons to the gross tons is high suggesting efficient utilization of space which means good design.

What impresses me most about this ship is her small engines but which is enough for an overnight ferry here that are no longer in races (well, anyway it was only the Cebu-Cagayan route which was known for great races before). She has only 3,600 horsepower on tap from two Niigata main engines which is really on the low sides of engines with her length and capacity. Well, many of the overnight ferries of the recent years of her size even has double her horsepower. And a “modern” one, the new Starlite Ferries has only a design speed of 14.5 knots from 3,650 horsepower and those are only 67 meters in length! If they simply borrowed the design of Filipinas Cebu they might have had a winner.

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The low horsepower suggests she is on the stingy side on fuel consumption. But she is not a slowpoke as her design speed or the speed when new is 16 knots which is better than that of the new Starlite Ferries. At her age of 23 years and with not much metal added, I reckon she is still easily capable of 14 knots which is median too now for the overnight ferries that are in the longer routes like Cebu to northern Mindanao. Well, I know the Cebu to Leyte ferries are slower because at an average distance of 60 nautical miles even if the sail only at 10 knots they will still reach their destination at dawn.

The almost-permanent route of Filipinas Cebu is actually the Cebu-Iloilo route, the longest direct overnight route from Cebu as of today at 180 nautical miles (through the northern route) which usually takes 14 hours to cover with the ferries doing that route. The Filipinas Cebu is actually the most beautiful ship to hold this route in the recent years, the most modern and also the youngest.

The Filipinas Cebu came to Cokaliong Shipping Lines in 2007 from Ise Bay Ferry or Isewan (Ise-wan) Ferry where she was known as the Mikawa Maru. She was built in 1993 by Naikai Zosen in Setoda, Japan. That means she was only 14 years old when she came here and few were the ships that were that young that came here in the recent years. She might have cost Cokaliong Shipping Lines more money to acquire but I think the company was lucky to have her as the reliable service that can be expected from her is long and besides her lines would still not yet look old or obsolete for many years to come. Well, in lines alone I would take her anytime compared to the new ferries of Starlite Shipping which look ugly (by modern standards) to me.

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This ship has two-and-a-half decks of passenger accommodations with the highest at the navigation deck. She has a poop deck with chairs and tables which is the usual Cokaliong Shipping Lines design. This part of the ship can be used for eating dinner, for lounging, for sundowners or just for meeting new friends. Of course it is always clean and well-scrubbed which is the Cokaliong Shipping Lines trademark. All parts of their ships are always clean especially the passenger accommodations.

The ferry’s accommodation is divided into 5 classes: Suite, Cabin, Tourist, Lounge and the usual Economy. The Lounge is more or less the equivalent of the Jetseater Class but better as the settee is better and it has more space. I noticed that for its distance the Cebu-Iloilo fares are cheaper per nautical mile compared to the Cebu to northern Mindanao and Cebu to Leyte routes. Maybe the Filipinas Cebu was assigned the long Iloilo route because she is not thirsty on fuel and so the fares are low.

With 14 meters in breadth, the Filipinas Cebu has three lanes for vehicles in her car/cargo deck plus loose cargo in the the nooks and crannies. However, what she usually loads are basically loose and palletized cargo which are handled by forklifts in the traditional Cebu style which means one forklift inside the car/cargo deck and one forklift outside passing to each other the goods.

I do not know if the Filipinas-Cebu is considered the flagship in Cokaliong Shipping Lines but maybe she is. In this company there is no default way of gauging this as they don’t sail the premier Cebu-Mindanao route which is the Cebu-Cagayan route. I can only guess with her name and the route she is holding that she might be the highest in the totem pole of Cokaliong Shipping Lines. Well, for size she is one of the biggest of the shipping company and at relative par with the other big ones like the Filipinas Nasipit, Filipinas Iligan and Filipinas Butuan. The Filipinas Iloilo and Filipinas Maasin are as big but they are already old, slow ships that are already past their prime.

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Photo by Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc.

This ship like others in the Cokaliong fleet does a back-and-forth short route in her off-days which is her 7th day of the week. Though utilized all days of the week this ship has been very reliable with no reports of mechanical breakdowns.

With her size, speed and relatively small engine plus her looks might be the best overnight ferry around in Cebu. Even after nearly ten years of service here, she seems not diminished.

I guess she will still sail satisfactorily for many more years to come and along the way earn many more fans.

If Only Cokaliong Shipping Lines Would Use the Filipinas Nasipit in the Cebu-Batangas Route

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For me, the Filipinas Nasipit which was the former Taiko is striking in two ways. One is its sleek design that is beautiful to behold. She looks modern and fast, which she is. And that brings us to the second striking characteristic of Filipinas Nasipit – her design speed is high at 21.5 knots which is liner range in the Philippines. The only overnight ferry that is close to her in design speed is the Trans-Asia 3 at 20 knots. And we know Trans-Asia 3 is still capable of 18 knots if only the fuel cost is not a consideration. Nowadays, with capitulation of Cebu Ferries there was no need for overnight races anymore.

At a design speed of 21.5 knots and at her age, I believe Filipinas Nasipit is still capable of over 18 knots even though some metal were added to her in refitting here (it was not really much). My guess is at full trot she can still run at 19-20 knots which is easily in the range of the best liners of 2GO at present. So, she is liner in speed capability.

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Photo by John Carlos Cabanillas

In the past, the Aboitiz Shipping Corporation liners SuperFerry 2 and SuperFerry 5 sail the 394-nautical mile Cebu-Manila route in 22 hours by sailing at the 17.5-18 knots range (those two sister ships had a design speed of 19 knots which is the maximum sustained speed when new). I want to use it as comparison since they go under the Mactan bridges. I assume Filipinas Nasipit is also capable of sailing under the two Mactan bridges and need not go round Mactan island which adds to transit time and fuel cost.

Batangas is 6 hours away from Manila. So, if Filipinas Nasipit is used in the Cebu-Batangas route and assuming she sails at 18 knots then she will be in Batangas in 16 hours. It could even be less if she turns on the speed like liners do. I want to stress this because at 15-16 hours sailing time then she will then be ready to sail the next night. Therefore, theoretically, a three times a week Cebu-Batangas sailing is possible. If the extra day in a week is used in a short route like Dumaguete then actually she would also act as a Batangas-Cebu-Dumaguete ferry once a week. Neat?

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Photo from James Gabriel Verallo

I believe the Cebu-Batangas route has enough potential in passengers and cargo. If 2GO still finds their Cebu-Manila route profitable now, there is a percentage of those passengers that will be amenable to a Batangas drop-off or disembarkation like the passengers going to CALABARZON except Rizal. There is also the potential enticements of lower fares, shorter sailing hours and without the hassle of going to or going out of North Harbor (because access to that national port is horrible with all the road congestion and traffic of Manila plus the crime and grime). Cokaliong Shipping Lines can also have a tie-up with a bus company going to Manila for the convenience of the passengers and its luggages.

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Photo from James Gabriel Verallo

The Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) was not successful in the Cebu-Batangas route in the passenger category because the sailing time was long since it passes through Masbate and their ship Super Shuttle RORO 3 was not fast since its speed was in the overnight ferry range and not in the liner range. The fare was cheap but the food is not free and there is not even a Tourist Class (there was a space for it but it was never opened). The ship also lacks amenities and the NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness) at the stern where the Economy was located was not good. It was also hot since air flow even during sailing is restricted. I don’t think Super Shuttle RORO 3 ever made a dent on the passengers of Aboitiz Transport System and 2GO especially since she only sailed once a week.

Filipinas Nasipit State-of-the-Art Bridge

Photo by Mark Ocul

But in speed the Filipinas Nasipit is a match to the 2GO liners. The frequency always matters too. Waiting for two days is not long unlike waiting for a week like in the AMTC ship. The Filipinas Nasipit might be small but she has enough capacity and the route is much just like an extended overnight route. And besides the Filipinas Nasipit is well-designed unlike Super Shuttle RORO 3 and it is already modern. Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated was lucky to acquire her since it can be used in a route like that.

In terms of cargo, I think the Cebu-Batangas route has potential from the trucks going to Manila and CALABARZON and new cars destined for Cebu (and also the trucks going back). Batangas is a drop-off port of many imported new cars and also cars that comes from assembly plants in Laguna. I heard the cargo capacity of Filipinas Nasipit is small but if she is viable in an overnight route to Mindanao then if her load in the Batangas-Cebu route is good then she will also be profitable, why not?

Cafeteria

Photo by Mark Ocul

A departure of 6pm means the ship is not obliged to serve dinner to the passengers, according to traditional rules. The arrival then will be 9 or 10am and if breakfast is required then it will not be hard for the ship since breakfast is easier to prepare as it can just be continental breakfast (prito-prito lang plus coffee). However, some adjustments might be needed in the ship since overnight ships does not really have big restaurants. A shortcut that can be applied is breakfast that is served in styropor boxes.

Tables at the Sundeck

Can be used for serving breakfast on-the-go; photo by Mark Ocul

I have long thought that a Cebu-Batangas ship, as long as it is fast and it is fit in terms of accommodations will be viable in the long run when it is well-advertised as an alternative to Manila, its schedule is reliable, its accommodations are topnotch and it has a decent service. In cleanliness, Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc. no longer need to adjust since their ships are even cleaner than the liners. The Filipinas Nasipit will fit the bill here.

A 15- or 16-hour sailing is not really that taxing to the crew. An 8-hour lay-over is enough for the rest of the crew and for cargo loading and unloading. That is also long enough for loading supplies and cleaning and preparing the ship for the return voyage. As for the company, the ship will have greater usage and profit because that is just like doing a Cebu-northern Mindanao route twice a day (in terms of sailing time as in fast sailing time).

Camagong Business Class

Photo by Mark Ocul

Filipinas Nasipit has a passenger capacity of 685 and I think that is already enough especially at the start. If some of the accommodations are the equivalent of jetseaters of before then it will not matter as liners also offered jetseaters in the past. And actually it offers good savings if priced right.

I just hope Cokaliong Shipping Lines thinks about a Cebu-Batangas route and gives it a try. They will have no competition in the route in passengers, the route has great potential, they have the right ship for a start and they already have the passenger service and cleanliness plus the attitude needed to compete in a route to Luzon (actually they are well above the overnight ships from Batangas).

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I hope to see a service from them soon. I will ride, why not?

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A Slew of Hand-Me-Down Cruiser Ferries and Then a Grand Overnight RORO Ferry (The Start of Roble Shipping Inc.)

Jose Roble, the founder of Roble Shipping Incorporated originally was from Danao City. That city is the bastion of the Durano clan and and made to what it is by Ramon M. Durano Sr., one the Grand Old Men of Cebu politics. This was after he was lured by Philippine Presidents to move up north so political tension in Cebu will be de-escalated. They did it with industrial incentives, the reason why Ramon M. Durano Sr. was able to establish factories, plants and processing facilities and even a stake in shipping.

The late Durano patriarch was good in building up people and that included people who made good elsewhere. That included the former Senator Alejandro Almendras (who first made good as Davao Governor), the former Davao Governor Vicente Duterte, father of the recently-elected President of the Philippines Rodrigo Duterte and Jose Roble. Jose Roble was first into cargo handling or arrastre (Roble Arrastre Inc.) until he ventured into shipping under the company Roble Shipping Incorporated.

Roble Shipping is into cargo but what is more known by the public is their passenger operation. They started in 1985 with the cargo vessel Marao, a ship built in 1965. They converted the ship so it can also take in a few passenger and sailed it from Cebu to Hilongos. The year 1985 was the tailend of the Marcos dictatorship and it was a period of great political and economic crisis. It was actually a propitious time to start, but simply, as the shipping lines then of all kinds were under heavy stress and some were collapsing outright and some were also tottering.

For the next twelve years Roble Shipping made passenger ship acquisitions that were very simple and very conservative (but they also bought a few cargo ships). Always, the mark of their acquisitions in this period were the ships they bought were hand-me-downs, old and about ready for the breakers. Early on, tt just seemed to me that they were just one step ahead of Ting Guan, the biggest and legendary scrap metal dealer in Cebu which also buys ships as scrap (the good thing about Ting Guan is they just buy ships that have no more place to go unlike the China and South Asian breakers).

Those were wise moves. If the acquisition failed it can just be sold for scrap with almost no loss compared to the purchase value. Meanwhile, it might even earn and gain recognition for Roble Shipping. That period of the late 1980’s was actually also good for starting in shipping because many shipping companies has already gone under and the former workhorses of our fleet, the ex-”FS” and ex-”F” ships were already in its last breadth and MARINA, the maritime regulatory agency was cracking down heavily on the wooden motor boats (locally called as lancha or batel).

In 1986, Roble Shipping purchased the Don Bonifacio from Carlos A. Gothong Lines. This ship was the former Scorpius of the bankrupt NORCAMCO Lines which had routes to Romblon, Bicol and Northern Samar. Roble Shipping also acquired the former Surigao Transport of the tottering Sea Transport Company. Roble Shipping did the Marao treatment to her and added a small passenger accommodation and renamed her as the May Josephine. She tried the Cebu-Zamboanga route. Roble Shipping also purchased the Waka Maru from Manila Inter Ocean Liners. She became the first Hilongos Diamond. Her name already betrays her route.

All of these ships were built in Japan in the 1950’s, a time when metallurgy was not yet advanced hence engine lives were not that long. The four along with Marao did not serve for any long time for Roble Shipping as they were already beaten up but the company was adept in buying a replacement when a ship of theirs was already in its last gasps. Roble Shipping was good in beating the last life out of a ship and in a sense that was good because in the earlier days one only sends a machinery to the scrap yard when it is already unrepairable. I think the penchant of Roble Shipping in keeping many ships in Mandaue Pier 7 might have started from this – just send in the ships that can sail from a fleet with many old reserves.

In the years 1988, 1989 and 1990, Roble Shipping bought the overnight cruiser ferries being retired by Trans-Asia Shipping Lines Inc. (TASLI) which by then was already shifting to overnight RORO ferries. These became the Guada Cristy [1], Guada Cristy [2] and Queen Belinda in their fleet. These ships lasted longer than their earlier ships as they were not really that beaten up. However, Guada Cristy [1] was caught by the strongest typhoon to visit Cebu City in 1990, the Typhoon “Ruping” and was wrecked. Later the Queen Belinda also took the name of Hilongos Diamond. For a time these ferries from Trans-Asia Shipping Lines formed the backbone of Roble Shipping.

Later, in the mid-1990’s Roble Shipping Incorporated acquired the cruiser ferries being retired by Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated (CSLI) in favor of RORO ferries. This is the second time Roble Shipping became the recipient of cruiser ferries being retired. Cruiser ferries have nowhere else to go at that time with the possible exception of Zamboanga so such moves by Roble Shipping extended their lives. These ships became the Leyte Diamond and Cebu Diamond in their fleet and being not beaten up served Roble Shipping well.

In the late 1990’s, Roble Shipping also acquired the Ormoc Star and this ship became very associated with the company. At this decade Roble Shipping was undoubtedly the cruiser ferry specialist of Central Visayas. However, in the midst of all these cruiser ferry purchases, one grand ferry, a RORO big and good enough to be a liner came into the fleet of Roble Shipping Incorporated. This was their first RORO ship and she was called the Southern Queen. She arrived for the company in 1997.

The Southern Queen was no ordinary overnight ferry. From her size, her origin as a Kansai Kisen ship with a classification as cruiseferry and her appointments she can match the best of the overnight ferries in the premier Visayas-Mindanao route, the Cebu-Cagayan de Oro route. She was so good I was even wondering what was she doing in the Roble fleet, no offense meant. I thought she was to be used in the Cebu-Nasipit route, for which Roble Shipping Incorporated is a holder of a Certificate of Public Convenience (CPC) which is otherwise known as a franchise.

The Southern Queen was first known as the Maya Maru in Japan. She was ordered by Kansai Kisen KK from Hashihama Zosen and she was delivered in June 1971. She was built in the Hashihama yard and she measured 89.3 meters by 14.6 meters with a gross register tonnage (GRT) of 3,228 and a deadweight tonnage (DWT) of 508 tons. Maya Maru was a steel-hulled ship with a raked stem and a retrouvaille stern which looks like a transom stern slanted forward. She had a forward mast and a center funnel that was also the stern mast. The ship also had a false funnel at the center which was also an observation and functions deck. The original passenger capacity of Maya Maru was 1,000 passengers in three passenger decks.

The ship had a stern ramp for vehicles and a car deck. Her superstructure encompassed the whole ship so there is no side passageways. Almost the entire passenger area of the ship was airconditioned. She was equipped with two Pielstick engines built by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company which is more popularly known then as IHI. This pair of engines produced a total of 8,400 horsepower and that was shafted to two screws. This gave the ship a top speed of 21 knots originally.

In 1979, Maya Maru was transferred to Sogo Lease KK and she became a cruiseferry with no change of name. She was paired with three other cruiseferries. One was the Sunflower 1, a sister ship of Mabuhay 1 and Princess of New Unity and two other cruiseferries which became known here as the St. Francis of Assisi and Our Lady of Lipa (now, those three is regal company). In 1997, the ship was transferred to Roble Shipping Incorporated where she became the Southern Queen. Under this company the interior was renovated so that she will become an overnight ferry. Bunks were fitted along with a big cabin for the Tourist Class. Since the ship originally had a nearly fully-enclosed superstructure there was not much space where to build an open-air Economy Class except to modify the top deck somehow. The original cabins of the ship were more or less retained as Cabin and Suite Class. The wide functions areas and restaurants of the ship were practically removed but a front desk and a lounge was retained.

In refitting her, although no part of the superstructure was removed, the gross tonnage of the ship went down to 1,598 nominal tons which was an impossibility. Again the MARINA “magic meter” was at work. Her declared net tonnage or NT was 978 nominal tons and the deadweight tonnage (DWT) went down to 478. Her route was Cebu-Ormoc and she was the biggest, most beautiful, most luxurious ship and speediest in that route. Her deployment was a big factor in the establishment of Roble Shipping as a force in Visayas shipping. No longer was she a simple receptor of hand-me-downs. In fact from this time on, they no longer bought a ferry from other companies except when the Cagayan Princess and Cebu Princess of Sulpicio Lines were offered to them under exceptional circumstances and price. And the two was laid up for long in Mandaue Pier 7 as the wont of Roble Shipping before and even now.

In 2002, Southern Queen was renamed as the Heaven Star. Southern Queen/Heaven Star sailed for Roble Shipping for about a decade until her engines became balky and unreliable. With that development she began spending more time moored in their wharf in Mandaue. Initially, Ormoc Star substituted for her but when the Wonderful Stars arrived in 2007 and took her route I smelled the beginning of her end. She might have been fast but speed is really not a big asset in the Cebu to western Leyte routes which average less than 60 nautical miles in distance. Wonderful Stars might not have been as big as her but she has more than enough passenger and cargo capacity and speed good enough for dawn arrivals. However, with an engine horsepower of exactly half of Heaven Star, she is more of a winner. Heaven Star‘s engines actually has a reputation for being thirsty.

After a few years of not sailing Heaven Star was slowly broken up in Roble wharf in Pier 7 in Mandaue starting in 2010. The process took until 2011 when only her hulk remained. We heard the sale of her steel was used to fund the rehabilitation of the two ferries from Sulpicio Lines which became the Theresian Stars and Joyful Stars in their fleet.

Heaven Star might have been completely gone now but her donee Theresian Stars and Joyful Stars are still sailing for Roble Shipping. Now Roble Shipping is one of the Visayan overnight ferry majors.

Really, it doesn’t matter where or how one started, as they say.

[Image Credit: Hans Jason]                                                                                                                             [Database Support: Mervin Go Soon/Jun Marquez/Mike Baylon]