My Recent Trip To Hagnaya

I promised myself that when I come back to Cebu I will visit Hagnaya again and try to find the shipyards that I was not able to reach last January. I also promised myself  that I will go via the San Remigio-Tabuelan route which I failed to find last time because of a misinformation. And that exactly what I intended to do when I set out.

To be sure I will be able to pass the Tabuelan-San Remigio road, I intended to take the Inday Memie bus that has a route to Tabuelan and Maravilla or even beyond like Lambusan. I was early at Cebu North Bus Terminal at before 5:30am but I found out the first Inday Memie bus was still at 7am. I was worried about the lost time and thought about taking a direct route to Hagnaya via Bogo especially with a Cebu Auto Bus parked which I desired to ride but I feared what happened last time. I don’t want trying to find a mid-afternoon ride to Tabuelan and worrying if all the connecting rides will work out fine.

And so I waited for the Inday Memie bus while at the same time weighing if I will continue the trip as I was not feeling very well. But a dose of Mountain Dew cured my ailment and I already knew what it was. When the bus took its parking place I took the front seat for maximum observation. It was a slow bus in early going trying to find passengers but I didn’t really mind. It even passed by a meal stop. After three hours we were already in Tabuelan but I did not go down the bus to visit Tabuelan port. There are other members that cover that port and if I visit it is likely I will only find a solitary Tristar Megalink ship there and I will probably lose an hour which is better spent trying to find the Hagnaya shipyards and fish landing areas.

But I did not realize I was on the wrong side of the bus because a kilometer after Tabuelan town Tabuelan Bay came into view with its two ports, the old Tabuelan port and the new wharf for Goldenstar Shipping that lies on the other side of the bay. With the right place and timing shots can be taken from a bus if there is an ultrazoom lens. Since I was not ready I was not able to distinguish much if there are ships there. But I espied that the half-sunk fastcraft of Aznar Shipping was still there. On a next ship spotting the shortcut is to take a tricycle to that vantage point and prepare a long lens and the best will be to take the earlier Tabuelan/Tuburan bus of Ceres Liner.

We were then on the way to San Remigio and I have to be dropped on a point where there is already a jeep to San Remigio. Alternatively if the Inday Memie bus is for Lambusan then there will already be Ceres buses on the way to San Remigio. The jeep was very slow as it was always looking for passengers. Again I did not really mind. No use being upset by what are actually local conditions. Best thing is to really just have a lot of time.

I realized the Tabuelan-San Remigio road is not really a coastal road. On most parts of the road there is no view of the coast and of the sea. What I found out was there was a lot of mangrove ponds and I began to understand why Haganaya is historically associated with fishing (ditto for Daanbantayan and Bogo which also have a lot of mangrove ponds).

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I reached Hagnaya junction after more than 5 hours of travel and I then transferred to a tricycle to Hagnaya port. It was already 11:38am when I reached it and first thing I did was to look for food as I did not really have breakfast. I also used that rest to ask around and let the light rain pass. After the meal I had a quick tour of Hagnaya port so I can have two tours of it while I am there.

I was informed the farthest shipyard was in Punta which is already beyond Hagnaya and the conveyance there is a motorcycle or habal-habal in local parlance. Not really cheap as it is some three kilometers away but I had it rented so I can save time and energy. We reached Punta alright and it was true that only LCTs are built there and not fishing vessels like in the other shipyards of Hagnaya.

I found out the owner of the yard is also the owner of Island Shipping Corp. There is an LCT being built there and the name is LCT Island Ventures III. Its completion is estimated to be November of 2017. It is powered by Weichai engines from Dynamic Power in Mandaue, a facility the PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) was able to visit in 2015 through an arrangement made by Capt . John Andrew Lape, a PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) member.

It is the place where the LCTs of Island Shipping Corp. are built or refitted. The first two LCTs was just refitted there and the hulls came elsewhere. However, the more recent LCTs of Island Shipping Corp. have already been built there.

Interviewing the Island Shipping engineer, I learned the cruiser ferries of Island Shipping have already been sold and the only remaining one is the Super Island Express II, their former Cebu-Tubigon ferry which is now plying the Tangil-Dumanjug route via the Bolado port. And that lays to rest the question why the Island Shipping cruisers can no longer be seen in Hagnaya.

With the rented motorcycle I visited the ports of Hagnaya especially those I was not able to reach last January. My driver is a former employee of Mr. Alexander Tan, the owner of Island Shipping. He clarified he is not a mariner but a cook decades back when Mr. Alexander Tan was not yet into shipping but in the trading business and motor bancas are used to transport goods until Mr. Tan entered the shipping industry.

I asked my driver how many shipyards are there in San Remigio and he answered five and I countered there must be near ten. It surfaced that they count not by yards but by ownership and related ownership. If two nearby yards have related owners they only count it as one. All the other shipyards of Hagnaya build just fishing vessels. They have a curious term for the fishing vessels that venture far. They call it “shipper”. The yards double as fish landing areas because it is forbidden to land fish in Hagnaya port and Hagnaya has no fishport. Imagine Hagnaya which is practically the fishing capital of northern Cebu island and very near the Visayan Sea having no fishport. I really wonder how our government decides where fishports should go as there are fishports in areas with marginal fishing.

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In a yard I was visiting I was lucky to cover the departure of Super Shuttle Ferry 23 while at the same time the Island RORO I was passing by. But I was in a little hurry to finish my ship spotting of the fishing vessels and fish landing areas of Hagnaya. That is really the problem of long-distance ship spotting – more time is spent traveling. I want to finish before 2pm because after that all the departures of the buses in Hagnaya port is only when a ferry arrives from Bantayan island and the next trip will be 3pm already. With that departure and the slow buses of Cebu island I won’t be able to cover any other port anymore.

There are yards I did not try to enter anymore and just tried to cover their ships from the adjacent yards. But the negatives are I don’t have a good angle at times and I am not able to make short interviews or observe what kind of fish is being unloaded if I was not too late for that. But I also was able to visit the wharf near Hagnaya port which is a fish landing area too and which has a big motor banca for an island between Bantayan island and Negros island and I was able to cover her departure.

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Back in Hagnaya port I did not try to board the ferries anymore as I was intent on being able to make the 2pm bus. However, I was still able to field queries especially about the Hagnaya-Cawayan (Masbate) LCT of Island Shipping. This time around I saw it is a possible way for me to reach Naga without being forced in an overnight stay in Masbate City if the LCT will arrive in Cawayan at 1pm and the last trip from Masbate to Pio Duran is 4pm. A little iffy but possible if the van is fast and the ferry in Masbate does not leave earlier than her ETD.

At 1:35pm I was already done. It took me nearly two hours to finish my ship spotting and it was really a rush kind with no time lost anywhere. I was able to make the 2pm bus and used it as a respite. I was still able to get a shot of the departure of LCT Island Ventures II which I was not able to anticipate but with me inside the bus I did not notice the arrival of the Super Shuttle Ferry 26 of the Asian Marine Transport Corp. (AMTC), the main and only rival of Island Shipping Corp. I was just able to get a shot of her when the bus was already leaving the port. Oh, well, one can’t have it all.

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In Hagnaya port, I also noticed the wrecked fishing vessels in Hagnaya are already gone and only one remained. I was able to find they are now in one of the shipyards which I visited and it is obvious that they will be refitted. Well, we don’t really break ships if they are still salvageable.

Our Sugbo Transit Express bus was oh so really slow. As I said before if a bus carries the name “Express” it is surely a slow bus. With that speed I nearly had trouble making Carmen port before the light was already fading especially we had a meal stop before Carmen town where our driver and conductor really had a meal at just past 4pm when to think at lunchtime they were in Hagnaya. Maybe no discount is offered for them in Hagnaya and they fear getting hungry in CNBT.

I again hired a motorcyle to save on time and energy and I reached Carmen port at 4:35pm and that was nearly three hours after we left Hagnaya at 1:45pm. And I found out that the gate was locked and there is a guard who told me outsiders can no longer enter. He asked my purpose and I told him I want to take pictures of the ships there and he told me that is also forbidden. Now when some guards tell me it is forbidden to take pictures that always raises my goat. I asked him if I can take pictures of the truck. Now he sensed I was leading him into an absurd situation. Then I told him one can enter a military or police camp by leaving an ID card and stating the purpose and that he knows that. I then asked him if that lousy port is more security-conscious than a military camp. He then let me in. Sometimes what is just needed is just to bamboozle and intimidate the guards and lead them into absurd answers. Even before taking pictures I already told the guard to tell his higher-ups that they are crazy (sira-ulo). On the way out, I thanked him of course.

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The Cebu Sea Charterers LCTs were no longer there and just a tanker and tug were around plus the usual pleasure boats but there was a CSC road tanker and I asked it crew about their LCTs there. There were two in the route to Leyte and departures are 12mn and 12nn and I was early for the arrival from Leyte.

I was able to board a 5pm bus and there was still enough light when we passed Danao port and I was able to get shots from our moving bus like when I passed there in the morning. My trip home by bus from Carmen was much faster although there is traffic because I was not riding a Ceres bus and I did not have to go down in CNBT because our bus still continues to CST and beyond. I reached USC after just a little over two hours and I was home by dinner time and not that tired because the motorbikes save me a lot of energy.

The whole trip cost me more than 14 hours. Such is the cost of long-distance ship spotting.

The China-built LCTs

It seems that just like in buses, in due time China-made LCTs might rule our waves just like China-made buses are now beginning to rule the Luzon highways. The process will not be that sudden though because ships last longer than buses and it is much more costlier to acquire ships. We too have that attachment to our old ships and we don’t suddenly just let them go. But then who knows if some crazy people try to cull our old ferries? I am sure many of the replacements of them will be Cargo RORO LCTs and ROPAX LCTs from China. They are simply that cheap and the terms are good. One thing sure though is the replacements will not be local-built ships. Local-builds generally cost much more than China-builds and the price of the ship is a key decision point.

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A Meiling LCT a.k.a. deck loading ship

A decade ago, China-built LCTs were practically unknown in the country as we were building our own LCTs in many shipyards around the country. Then the first palpable show of LCTs happened early this decade was when a lot of brand-new LCTs suddenly appeared and anchored for long in North Mactan Channel waiting for business. Some of these were rumored to be destined for the mines of Surigao which was then booming. That area already had China-owned and -built LCTs to carry ores to China just like some other provinces which allowed black sand mining had China-owned LCTs docking. But then here, I am talking of China-built LCTs that are locally-operated or owned. However, the Surigao mining boom when world metal prices spiked a decade ago because of China demand was one of our key introduction to China-built LCTs.

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Row of LCTs in North Mactan Channel

Then the demand for ore of China suddenly weakened and so those brand-new China-built LCTs that showed in Mactan Channel owned by Cebu Sea Charterers (of the renowned Premship group), Broadway One Shipping and Concrete Solutions Incorporated went into regular cargo moving. Later, the two companies plus others like Primary Trident Solutions (owner of the Poseidon series of LCTs), and Adnama Mining Resources which also acquired China-made LCTs went into Cargo RORO LCT operations like the Cebu Sea Charterers which meant conveying rolling cargo or vehicles between islands. The Cebu to Leyte routes was the first staple of the Cargo RORO LCTs. Cargo RORO LCTs were also fielded in the key Matnog-Allen and Liloan-Lipata routes to ease backlogs of trucks waiting to be loaded. They became the augmentations to short-distance ferry-ROROs in heavily crowded routes during peak season or when there are disruptions after typhoons.

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Cargo RORO LCTs in Carmen port

The old overnight passenger-shipping companies of Cebu more than noticed the emergence of the Cargo RORO LCTs and felt its threat to their trade and so they also joined the bandwagon in acquiring China-built LCTs. Roble Shipping first chartered LCTs from Asian Shipping Corporation before buying their own and those were China-made LCTs. However, it was Lite Ferries that made a bet in acquiring new China LCTs to be converted into passenger-cargo LCTs after some modifications. Outside of Cebu the shipping company 2GO, under the name NN+ATS and brand “Sulit Ferries” chartered China-built LCTs from Concrete Solutions Incorporated, which are the Poseidon LCTs for use in their Matnog-Allen route.

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A ROPAX LCT operated by Sulit Ferries (LCT Poseidon 26)

Meanwhile, LCTs were also tried by Ocean Transport & Key West Shipping as container ships. When they started they also chartered LCTs from Asian Shipping Corporation like Roble Shipping. They were successful in using LCTs as container ships and they were always full (and maybe to the chagrin of the CHA-RO messiah Enrico Basilio). This mode might be a no-frills way of moving goods through container vans but it is actually the cheaper way as LCTs are cheap to operate. Later, Ocean Transport & Key West Shipping also acquired their own LCTs with the blessings of Asian Shipping Corporation. Ocean Transport & Key West Shipping might have been successful in showing a new mode of transport but the self-proclaimed “shipping experts” never took notice of them nor studied their craft and mode.

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Brizu, a container carrier LCT by Ocean Transport

Asian Shipping Corporation (ASC) which really has a lot of LCTs for charter and probably with the most number in the country started by building their own LCTs right in their yards in Navotas just like some other smaller shipping had their LCTs built in Metro Manila wharves. Asian Shipping Corporation have not completely turned their back of own-built LCTs but more and more they are acquiring China-built LCTs which come out cheaper than local-builds. Shipbuilding on the lower technology level like LCT-building is at times can also be viewed too as selling of steel and China is the cheapest seller of steel in the whole world. Their engines and marine equipment are also on cheap end.

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ASC Ashley of Asian Shipping Corporation

Another big operator of China-built LCTs that must be noted is the Royal Dragon Ocean Transport which owns the Meiling series of LCTs. Many of their LCTs can be found in Surigao serving the mines there. Right now, China-built LCTs are already mushrooming in Central and Eastern Visayas but in other parts of the country they are still practically unknown except in Manila or when passing by or calling. Ironically, it might actually be a typhoon, the super-typhoon “Yolanda” which devastated Leyte that might have given the China LCTs a big break because they were used in Leyte and in the eastern seaboard routes (in San Bernardino Strait and Surigao Strait) when there a big need for sea transport after the typhoon and their potential was exposed. The super-typhoon also showed the need for Cargo RORO LCTs separate from short-distance ferry-ROROs.

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Owned LCTs by Roble Shipping

Ocean Transport of Cebu, as stated earlier, now also have their own China LCTs to haul container vans from Manila after initially chartering from Asian Shipping Corporation. The same is true for Roble Shipping which initially chartered Cargo RORO LCTs from Asian Shipping Corporation for Cebu-Leyte use. Now other Cebu passenger shipping companies are also beginning to acquire their China LCTs. And that even includes Medallion Transport. Actually there are so many LCTs now from China that don’t have a name but just sports a number (i.e. LCT 308, etc.). But among Cebu overnight ferry companies, it is actually Lite Ferries who is betting the biggest on China LCTs that carries passengers too after some modifications.

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PMI-3, a Cargo RORO LCT of Premium Megastructures Inc.

In the following years I still see a lot of China-built LCTs coming and that will include LCTs that have provisions for passenger accommodations. If the government cull the old (but still good) ferries, I bet that type will suddenly mushroom especially in the short-distance routes. But of course it will not have the speed nor the comfort of the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROS. But who knows if that is actually the wish of some decision-making foggy old bureaucrats who don’t ride ships anyway? They will just be giving China yards and engine makers a big break. And a final note – LCTs from China are also called as “deck loading ships”. So don’t get confused.

Now let us just see how these China imports grow in size and importance.

My Trip to Danao and Carmen Ports

When I was in Cebu I had other tours and trips for I was always out in my 11 days there, rain or shine but it was almost always rain and so I bought a small, cheap umbrella from Prince upon the suggestion of the TASLI guard. The umbrella served me very well and without it I wouldn’t have been able to shipspot much. I also want to show that as I said we eat LPAs for breakfast when I was still studying in elementary and high school. A whole day rain for several days was not stranger to us then and it was even stronger like what I experienced in Allen.

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The view from the roof deck of the Danao fishport

Once I took a trip to Danao and Carmen ports. One reason is I also have to get a Sugbo Transit ticket for my friend Grek as he is a ticket collector. I got off before the bridge leading to Danao fishport, walked and took stock. The fishport trading section and its restaurants in the upper deck which we patronized in a PSSS tour then was already gone, not repaired after Typhoon “Yolanda”. They let me in but it was sad moments for I was all alone in the top deck. I can still imagine the laughter and gaiety of the group when we were there.

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I know how to time shipspotting events and I was there before lunchtime. As I expected two ferries from Camotes arrived, the Maica One of Jomalia Shipping and the Super Shuttle Ferry 24 of Asian Marine Transport System (AMTC). They joined the Mika Mari VI of Jomalia Shipping which was in port when I arrived. All throughout I used the fishport top deck as vantage point since I know getting inside the port will mean negotiations like last time and that will take time.

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One new thing in the area is a Jollibee restaurant by the port called the “Sands”. Its patronage is strong and I wonder if that was the one who sank the restaurants in the fishport. I queued but I realized my sugar will not hold and so I went instead to the fishport and ordered a meal in one of the carinderias there. After my meal I took notice of things I should take pictures of and it turned out mainly to be the ticketing offices there plus ship shots from the outside of the gates. Another thing also was they called the Maica One as the “Express”. It might have basis as her designed speed was 17 knots.

From the port I went to the Danao integrated terminal. I found out that the Carmen buses do not use the that and so there were no buses. Instead there were a lot of other vehicles including mountain, double-tire jeeps. I took one of the Multicabs and got off in Republic Drydock in Dunggo-an. Sad to say I was not able to gain entry (they want a recommendation from the Mayor but that will waste my time) and have to content myself with ships that were visible outside. It was mainly fishing boats that were there including derelict ones.

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Marker at the entrance of Republic Drydock

I then took a ride to Carmen and got off at the port junction near the Carmen campus of Cebu Technological University (CTU) and took a tricycle. I did not make the tricycle wait and so I know I am in for a long walk later. In the port I saw two Cargo RORO LCTs of Cebu Sea Charterers of the Premship group, the LCT 208 and the (yes, they will always have the number “8” because that is supposedly lucky. They were not loading yet (actually there was just one truck in the port) and so port activity was almost dead.

These Cargo RORO LCTs are what is threatening now the old overnight ROPAXes to Leyte (and Bohol) like that of Roble Shipping and Lite Shipping with their very cheap rates as in just barely over half of the usual rates. Of course it is a no-frills ride intended just for trucks and its crews. A memo in the Cebu Sea Charterers office made clear that they are only taking trucks and not passengers. The pioneer Cargo RORO LCT in Carmen, the LCT Mabuhay Filipinas was not there (later I found out she was undergoing Afloat Ship Repair or ASR near the Second Mandaue bridge).

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There was also a very small tanker in Carmen port, the Anna Rose. She was the smallest tanker I have seen and she was just powered by a single surplus Isuzu 10PE1 engine. Well, in the past there were tankers of just 300 horsepower too so I thought maybe that engine was sufficient. Of course she will not run fast. She was tied up there because of an engine problem (but there are many mechanics who can tackle that and parts are easy to source).

As usual, at a distance were the many yachts anchored in Carmen marina. There were about a dozen of them and many of those are actually owned by foreigners. I thought Carmen is also a good storm shelter. Again the decaying yachts and motor boats of Carmen port were still there. However, their decomposition are more advanced now compared to several years ago in my last visit with PSSS. There was also a DA-BFAR patrol boat (I wonder, Carmen is not a lair of fishing boats).

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With me just walking back to the highway, I was able to distill more info and understanding of Carmen. I found out that the enclosed marina leading to the visible stadium were the experimental fish farm of the College of Fisheries of CTU. And near Carmen port was an experimental station for fisheries research. Also visible in the enclosed marina was the “dunking machine” used to train the nautical students of the said university (Marine Engineering and Marine Engineering are the main offerings of CTU-Carmen).

I made a mistake once I got back to the highway after walking past the entrance of CTU-Carmen. I immediately took a bus going back to Cebu. What I should have done was go to Carmen poblacion, took a tour there and rode the Carmen-Cebu buses. I only realized that on my later trip north when I went to Maya and Hagnaya that were enough sights in Carmen town.

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The enclosed marina of Carmen

Got back to Cebu earlier but not really because of the traffic (which is worse now in Metro Cebu compared to the past years) and it was already a little late already for shipspotting. Darkness comes earlier on rainy days and Cebu was almost always raining during the Sinulog Festival week. And so I just instead went for bus spotting in the Cebu North Bus Terminal.

Glad to visit Danao and Carmen ports again and see what changed there. However, I can’t view my trip as very fruitful. Actually I felt a little bitin after that trip.

It Seems They Are Beginning To Fear The Cargo RORO LCTs Now

Once upon a time, in the early days of connecting islands, LCTs had a place as exemplified by Millennium Shipping in the 1970’s and the LCTs connecting Mactan island and the islands of Samar and Leyte. But as it moved into the 1980’s and the 1990’s, it was the short-distance ferry-ROROs that began connecting the islands like in San Bernardino Strait, in Surigao Strait, in Verde Island Passage, in Guimaras Strait, in Tanon Strait, in Bohol Strait, across Camotes Sea, in Basilan Strait and in Panguil Bay. LCTs began losing favor then and some of the reason might be psychological. There was a belief then that LCTs were “less safe”.

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It was actually only Maayo Shipping and Tri-Star Megalink which bucked the trend in those decades before the change of the millennium by still using LCTs as passenger-cargo carriers. To some extent, Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) can also be counted here before the start of the new millennium. Among the the most notable operator of passenger-cargo LCTS in this millennium are Lite Ferries and Starhorse Shipping Lines. Of course, LCTs also connected Samal island, Guimaras and Olutanga islands but I would rather exclude it here as they were very short connections like the connection across Sula Channel of Albay to Cagraray island.

LCTs as means of transport are slow and slower than short-distance ferry-ROROs. Their passenger accommodations are also very basic and small and can be uncomfortable. They were never really meant to be people carrier unless one is talking of the hybrid Korean LCTs (like the Ma. Angelica Grace, Reina Banderada, Reina Justisya and Star San Carlos among others) which have more comfortable passenger accommodations and even airconditioning plus bigger engines which afford speeds higher than the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs.

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I do not know which started the trend of using LCTs for vehicles mainly with not much intent to carry passengers. The most significant I noticed that had an operation like this was Golden Bridge Shipping of the Lua family (owner of a tramper company and Oceanjet) which has its base in Cansaga Bay and had a route to Hindang, Leyte. Early on they were known as Socor Shipping. Of course, Mandaue Transport also had a route from Mandaue to Tagbilaran and Simpoi Shipping had a route from Carmen to Ormoc.

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There were also LCTs that were used not for rolling cargo but as container van carriers. Ocean Transport chartered LCTs from Asian Shipping Corporation for this purpose which was copied by others until they were able to acquire their own LCTs. But of course, transit time from Manila to Cebu can take up to 4 days but container vans won’t protest unlike passengers. Some Asian Shipping Corporation LCTs were also chartered to load container vans from Manila to Cagayan de Oro.

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These operations are of course Cargo RORO operations. The only difference is instead of using Cargo RORO or RORO Cargo ships, LCTs are used. That is why I termed these LCTs as “Cargo RORO LCTs”.

Starting in 2012, LCTs from China began appearing in great number in Mactan Channel and the biggest owners were Cebu Sea Charterers, Broadway One Shipping, Concrete Solutions/Primary Trident Marine Solutions and Royal Dragon Ocean Transport. The first two simply had numbers as names of the LCTs. The third one was the owner of the Poseidon LCTs and the last one was the owner of the Meiling LCTs. Asian Shipping Corporation also bulked up their LCT fleet. Supposedly, these LCTs which were called “deck loading ships” in China will be used to transport ores from Surigao to China.

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However, two major happenings intervened. One, the need of China for ores declined and in November of 2013, Typhoon “Yolanda” wreaked havoc in Eastern Visayas. In the aftermath, in the need for relief and rehabilitation of the region, trucks and trailers have to cross. This happened during a time that the long-distance trucks were already running via Eastern Visayas as substitute for the ship-borne container vans and many of these are still destined for Mindanao.

Immediately, mile-long queues of trucks formed in the ports of Matnog, Allen, Liloan, Benit and Lipata leading to loud protests. MARINA then allowed the temporary use of LCTs which became de facto permanent until today. Meanwhile, there was also a great demand for bottoms to be used by trucks across Camotes Bay. Suddenly, the moored “deck loading ships” in Cansaga Bay was crossing Camotes Bay, San Bernardino Strait and Surigao Strait. Cebu Sea Charterers and the Poseidon LCTs slowly begans Cargo RORO LCT operations together with the Adnama LCTs (many more were used in Surigao and elsewhere). Roble Shipping meanwhile chartered LCTs from Asian Shipping Corporation which they replaced when they were able to acquire their own LCTs.

There was also an upsurge in LCT demand to Bohol and some old LCT began plying routes. Feeling their grip threatened, Lite Ferries bought them all lock, stock and barrel aside from buying additional LCTs. Meanwhile, Cebu Sea Charterers invaded other routes like the Carmen-Ormoc, the Dumangas-Banago and the Tuburan-Escalante routes. Suddenly, the lowly LCTs which became Cargo RORO LCTs looked menacing. Even the pioneer Golden Bridge Shipping which had queues even before “Yolanda” feels threatened now.

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How did this come to be? One reason is at the start, the overnight ferry companies crossing Camotes Sea did not give due regard to the rolling cargo or vehicles. They were too content in their successful palletized and loose cargo operations and they underestimated the need of the rolling cargo. At the start only Golden Bridge Shipping, Simpoi Shipping and Asian Marine Transport Corporation were servicing them. It seems Lite Ferries saw the need earlier than their fellow overnight ferry companies. Well, they are strong in rolling cargo operation in Bohol and is even dominating it.

Secondly, in terms of rates none can beat the Cargo RORO LCTs. They might be slow but in terms of rates they are far cheaper than the overnight ferry companies as in they can give rates that are cheaper by 40%. Well, they don’t need to invest in passenger services and accommodations and they have small engines compared to overnight ROROs. Now they even carry container vans not in trailers to Leyte from Cebu superseding the container ships that used to call in Leyte ports from Manila.

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That is always the danger brought by Cargo RORO LCTs, the low rates. Now feeling they can’t beat it, the overnight ferry companies are beginning to acquire their own LCTs. Lite Ferries is so well ahead in this game but Roble Shipping is already following suit. Medallion Transport seems not to be that worried yet because compared to other they saw immediately the need for rolling cargo operations and were not too dependent on palletized and loose cargo operations. After all they started in short-distance ferry-RORO operations and so they might have had a better understanding of rolling cargo from the start.

The old ROROs better adjust now. From what I heard even the big Asian Shipping Corporation which has the most number of ships in the Philippines is joining the fray. It seems they might have already tired of just chartering LCTs.

In the eastern seaboard, I heard the Cargo RORO LCTs are already the favorites of the truckers. As they say money talks. Price point as decision point is simply too easy not to miss. Everybody wants savings.

To me, it is no longer a question if the Cargo RORO LCT sector will take a slice of the pie. The question is how much. From container ships to liners to overnight ships to short-distance ferries, all are threatened. They will not be overwhelmed but they must be prepared to share the pie with the Cargo RORO LCTs. By how much, now that is the guessing game. All I know is the Cargo RORO LCT rates are simply unbeatable. And that might be sending shivers now down the spine of the competition.

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And I dare say this development is good. Rolling rates are simply too high in the Philippines because the regulatory agency MARINA never learned how to compute rates. It is as if fuel and distance are never really factored in.

Rolling cargo rates of the LCTs across Camotes Sea is now lower than RORO rate across Surigao Strait. How did that happen?