The Super Shuttle RORO 12 and Its New Route

Last April 30, the RORO Cargo ship Super Shuttle RORO12 of the Asian Marine Transport Corporation or AMTC participated in a very notable ceremony, the inauguration of the new Davao-General Santos City-Bitung route. I do not know when was the last time two Heads of State were present in the Philippines for a shipping inauguration. If there was one, it was eons ago. But right after the ASEAN Summit, President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines and President Joko Widodo of Indonesia came to Davao City for the inauguration. President Jokowi of Indonesia was even accompanied by her wife, the First Lady of Indonesia Iriana Widodo. I thought wow! that was the importance given on the opening of the route connecting the southern Philippines with eastern Indonesia. And the host of AMTC in Davao City, the Kudos Port was that lucky to have the presence of two Presidents. Wow, how lucky was Mr. Johnny Ng, the owner of the port. The inauguration might be “The Event” of his successful business career.

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And the ship Super Shuttle RORO 12 was also very lucky. Imagine all the photos and videos of her not only in media but also the social media. That goes true too to Kudos Port and its owner. Both the ship, the port are now famous and not only in Davao City. And then just past the narrows of Pakiputan Strait, the Super Shuttle RORO 12 met the China PLAN flotilla which is in a world tour and which picked Davao City as the first port of call. I do not know if that is auspicious but what a timing! It seemed a lot of attention was on Davao City that day and Super Shuttle RORO 12 was part of all that.

Viewing, talking of Super Shuttle RORO 12, I always have charged emotions. Many do not know but she is not a new ship in our waters for in 1994 she came to William Lines as the ROCON I. When she came she became the biggest cargo ship in the whole country, bar none. She was then the pride of William Lines and justifiably so. During the time she came, William Lines was in a battle to keep pace with Aboitiz Shipping and Sulpicio Lines which were both ahead of her in container ships before ROCON I arrived.

But when she arrived I had the thought, “Can ROCON I be fit for local routes or is she meant to do Far Eastern routes?” The reason behind that thought is ROCON I was much larger than the container ships in the country which is just about 90 meters or 100 meters in length and ROCON I was 160 meters in length. Even compared to the Ramon Aboitiz and Vidal Aboitiz of Aboitiz Shipping which were built in Ukraine, she was significantly bigger. And I thought “Is ROCON I the William Lines slam dunk a la Filipina Princess and Princess of the Orient of Sulpicio Lines?” When those two grand liners of Sulpicio Lines came in 1988 and 1993m they were much larger than the liners of the competition. And now ROCON I was just like those two.

I noticed the name “ROCON” was a play on the characteristics of the ship which is “RORO” and loads container vans. Before she came most the container ships in the country load and unload “LOLO”, an acronym for “Lift On, Lift Off”. That means in loading and unloading booms are used to lift the container vans. Meanwhile, ROCON I is a true RORO Cargo ship true. There are no cargo booms and container vans are hauled into or hauled off the ship. This means the container vans are aboard trailers that are pulled by prime movers. This system is actually faster in loading and unloading but trailers are an additional capital expense and there can’t be maximization like in LOLO ships where container vans are stacked with practically no wasted space.

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In Europe, the origin of ROCON I, RORO Cargo ships carry all types of vehicles crossing the seas from sedans to trucks to trailers. Since the load are vehicles then ramps are needed as access to the different car levels. Aside from ramps as access to the port, the RORO Cargo ships have car ramps connecting the various level and up to the sun deck. Sometimes lifts or elevators are also used. So even though ROCON I is a big ships in TEU her capacity is only 500. She was certainly not the first container ship with ramps here as the very first container ship of William Lines, the Wilcon 1 has a ramp and operates ROLO which means she has cargo booms at the front and a car ramp at the stern for combined RORO and LOLO loading and unloading. The Wilcon 4 of William Lines also has a RORO ramp and so do the Sinulog of Escano Lines but what really sets apart ROCON 1 is she has no booms and that is actually a leap of faith for William Lines as not much cars and trucks are loaded locally and for a ship to just carry 500 TEUs on 6,500 horsepower, the ratio does not seem to be too good.

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The ROCON I was built as the Mercandian Gigant for Nolis in 1984 by Frederikshavn Vft in Fredirikshavn, Denmark. Her name was already a giveaway to her size and she measured 160.5 meters by 22.3 meters with a gross register tonnage (GRT) of 15,375 tons. In those days those measurent were already very big (nowadays, container ships of over 200 meters are already common). Mercandian Gigant has a design speed of 16 knots from 6,500 horsepower from a single MaK engine. The ship was already equipped with the modern bulbous bow. Of course, she has only a single funnel.

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The lift. The mezzanine is at the background.

Inside the ship has three RORO decks for vehicles plus a mezzanine for cars aside from the top or sun deck which is also used for loading vehicles. Ramps connect the different levels and lifts are also employed. Like most RORO Cargo ships there is a tower at the front which accommodates the crew and the drivers of the vehicles and the bridge at the top. There are cabins for the drivers with its own toilet and bath and there are drawing rooms and a common galley which in layman’s word is the kitchen and restaurant of the ship (the term “galley” comes from the earlier centuries). Drawing rooms are the lounges of the ship and the officers have a separate drawing room. 

In 1995, ROCON I came to the Philippines and William Lines as mentioned before. She really seemed too big then for the route to Cebu. The ship did not sail long for William Lines because the “Great Merger” that produced the William, Gothong & Aboitiz or WG&A shipping company came on January 1, 1996 and she became the SuperRORO 200 in the new company. The next year the ship was sold abroad. And that was one thing I cannot understand about WG&A. They were able to accumulate a few good container ships that do not look like general-purpose cargo ships like the bulk of the Wilcons, Sulcons, Lorcons and Aboitiz Concarriers but instead of maintaining the routes to Hongkong and other ports in the Far East what WG&A did instead was to withdraw from foreign routes and surrender to the foreigners. What happened next was only foreign ships were carrying our container vans with the probable exception of Eastern Shipping Lines. While withdrawing from foreign routes what WG&A did was also to bully the smaller shipping companies in the country and in some cases that resulted in the collapse of the weaker shipping companies.

Of the ships we sold aboard it was ROCON I which first came back and that was completely unexpected as ships sold abroad never come back. The only other ship to come back here was the former SuperFerry 16 which became the St. Therese of Child Jesus of 2GO. So when the former Amirouche came here in 2015 to become the Super Shuttle RORO 12 I was shocked when the IMO Number (which is IMO 8222733) told me she was the former ROCON I. I was able to visit her in AMTC Pier 8 days after she arrived. I asked Yangyang Rodriguez, a high officer of AMTC if she was a former ship here and it seems he played coy with me. But of course IMO Numbers don’t lie and that is the beauty of it. Very easy in tracing a ship but MARINA, the local maritime administrator doesn’t use that because they insist on their own ship identification number which is useless in tracing ships.

Amirouche, the last name of the ship was refitted and she became the Super Shuttle RORO 12, the last big RORO Cargo ship so far of AMTC. She did not have a permanent route like the other RORO Cargo ships of the company. Sometimes she would come to Davao.

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Docked off Davao before inauguration

The news came of the planned inauguration of the Davao-General Santos City-Bitung (Indonesia) route. Two weeks before the planned inauguration Super Shuttle RORO 12 was already waiting in the southern Davao anchorage in Pakiputan Strait. She was obviously newly painted. I imagine her interiors were spruced up too. Who can tell if the two Presidents will board the ship together with their First Ladies and other dignitaries? And two days before the inauguration she was already docked in Kudos Port. Maybe top officers of AMTC was already around to make sure all goes well. I am also sure the Presidential Security Group (PSG) checked every nook and cranny of the ship and practically sealed it.

I was surprised by the choice of the Super Shuttle Ferry 12 for the route as she is a big RORO Cargo ship and the route to Bitung is just starting. This route was already in the news for the last four years or so and nothing came out of it. Once I was told the route is already off because, “Bawal ang bigas, bawal ang asukal, bawal ang (cooking oil). E, ano na lang ang ikakarga namin?” There is really a very strong protectionist lobby because if we will follow the zero tariff ASEAN scheme we will be flooded by goods from our neighbors because they are more efficient, their labor and fuel costs are less and so their consumer goods are cheaper. Many Filipinos and even the educated ones don’t know that the prices of our basic goods is well over the world market price. That is why so many Filipinos are poor and they can’t even buy the basic necessities.

Now I wonder what changed that the route is on again. As usual the media is next to clueless. All they can say is the route is a boon to something (basta me maisulat lang). We have talked before to the Purser of Pelita Harapan, a big wooden motor boat that once had a Manado-Davao route. He said we have salable goods to Indonesia and that is what they carry like plywood, construction supplies, flour and Coca-Cola which are all produced in Davao. He said the equivalent goods that come from the industrial area near Jakarta is more expensive because of the distance. There are many Indonesia products that can be traded in Davao but because of quantitative restrictions (QRs) and denial of permits it will treated as “smuggling” here. That is the sad system and wrong understanding of “free trade” here. What they say as “free trade” is actually restricted trade.

The media and bureaucrats say that instead of container vans from Davao going the roundabout way to Indonesia via Manila and Jakarta (Tanjung Priok), the direct route will be cheaper. I don’t know who is fooling whom with that. There is practically no trade between southern Philippines and eastern Indonesia because “free trade” is regarded as “smuggling” and that was the previous viewpoint of Mayor Rodrigo Duterte. He didn’t want cheap rice, oil and sugar from Indonesia (that is why I am asking now what changed). If there was really significant trade that would have been visible in general-purpose ships. But actually it is hard to track them because MARINA cannot implement also the IMO requirement for AIS (Automatic Identification System) which is used track ships.

Actually what might happen is goods meant for eastern Indonesia will use General Santos City and Davao as intermediate ports (both these ports host foreign container ships regularly). So instead of the container vans offloaded in Tanjung Priok which is farther it will be offloaded in the two Philippine ports and supposedly there should be savings in cargo rates (but that is assuming there is enough volume).

I guess AMTC fielded only a big and good ship for the inauguration for pomp and effect. I do not think there is enough volume to sustain the Super Shuttle RORO 12. If needed be, AMTC has the smaller Super Shuttle RORO 14 and Super Shuttle RORO 6 (if it is running) for that.

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Super Shuttle RORO 12 on the way to Bitung

It is funny some are fooled by media that Super Shuttle Ferry 12 will accommodate passengers and some government officials echo that and even cited tourism. But the RORO Cargo ships of AMTC are not allowed to carry passengers. Did something change too in this regard? Bitung is the bigger port in that part of Sulawesi and the bigger city is Manado but its port is small. There was once a Davao-Manado plane but it was discontinued for lack of passengers. Even the Pelita Harapan is gone now and it was a Davao-Manado ship mainly used for cargo (and to repatriate Filipino prisoners in Indonesia). Pelita Harapan can carry cargo but not fuel for sale. Madidiskubre kasi na mura ang fuel sa Indonesia.

I wish Super Shuttle RORO 12 well. But let us just see what will happen to this new trade route.

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RORO Cargo Ships and Vehicle Carriers Can Be Good ROPAX Liners

In shipping, wherever that be in the world, fuel consumption is a critical factor because it takes up 40% of the operational costs of the ship. Here it might even be higher as our ships are old and our mariner rates are so low and apprentices comprise about half of the crew and they are the ones that pay and not the shipping company. So when fuel prices went really high a decade ago even the Fast ROPAXes of Europe capable of 30 knots slowed down to save on fuel. High Speed Crafts (HSCs) suffered also, had to slow down too and some stopped sailing for they were simply unprofitable even at very high load factors.

We too had been victims of that fetish with speed that in the 1990’s and so, many liners capable of 20 knots, locally, came into the country. The list of this is long and I would list it: Filipina Princess, Princess of Paradise, Princess of the Stars, Princess of the Universe, Princess of the World, Princess of the Ocean and Princess of New Unity, all of Sulpicio Lines; SuperFerry 1 of Aboitiz Shipping; Mabuhay 1 and Mabuhay 3 of William Lines; Our Lady of Lipa, SuperFerry 12, SuperFerry 14, SuperFerry 15, SuperFerry 16, SuperFerry 17 and SuperFerry 18 of WG&A; SuperFerry 20 and SuperFerry 21 of Aboitiz Transport System; St. Francis of Assisi, St. Joseph The Worker, St. Peter The Apostle, Mary Queen of Peace, St. Ezekiel Moreno, St. Michael The Archangel and St. Francis Xavier of Negros Navigation. SuperFerry 16 then came back to become the St. Therese of the Child Jesus of 2GO. A total of 26 liners. Now isn’t that too many? And most are 150 meters in length or over and the average passenger capacity is over 2,000 with 3 even breaching the 3,000 mark.

I argue that most proved to be oversized.

That speed came from oversized engines, usually 20,000 horsepower and over which means more fuel consumption and I was not happy with that trend in speed and the trend of upsizing the ships because I know that in the past when liners became bigger than the ex-”FS” ship, many ports with previous connection to Manila were left out because the liners were already too big and their drafts too deep for the small and shallow ports. Then later, the fast cruisers became the new paradigm and more ports have to be left out because to shorten voyage duration the interports were reduced. Gone were the old routes which featured four, five or even six ports of call and with voyages lasting several days.

Those big, fast liners might have been okay when ship passengers were still overflowing when there were still no budget planes and intermodal buses as competition. But that was not okay for the passengers left behind in the abandoned ports. It just created a generation or two of passengers not catered to by ships and grew up not relying on them.

And in the end the liner companies paid dearly for that. Even with advertisements they can no longer be coaxed into riding ships (even if they are painted pink). And that became a disaster for liner shipping when passengers thinned. Too few port calls mean less passengers and cargo – when the ships were already big and guzzling fuel and heavily needing those. And that just helped sink the liner sector of our shipping which has not recovered until now.

I argue that for the passenger loads and cargo sizes now our liners sailing are simply too big and that is the reason why they can’t or won’t call in the smaller ports served by liners until the end of the millennium like Ormoc, Surigao, Tagbilaran, Dapitan and others. It should go down in size and maybe add ports of call and damn if transit times are longer. What is more important is that the ships become fuller so that it will be more profitable. Anyway, those who want fast travel will simply take the budget planes. But still there are still many people which prefer the ships to the planes.

Moreover, the remaining liners now have engines too big to be profitable on marginal routes and smaller ports. I think the engines also have to be downsized. If fuel prices go up once more the liners won’t be profitable again.

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Our Lady of Sacred Heart by Chief Ray Smith

In downsizing and saving on fuel, there is one type of ship that is actually fit for us. These are the former RORO Cargo ships and Vehicle Carriers and we have several  examples of that in the past. Actually for the same size and length, RORO Cargo ships have smaller engines than ships which were ROPAXes from the start. They were not really built for speed but for economy while having a decent speed. And moreover on RORO Cargo ships not much steel has to be added as additional decks.

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Our Lady of Medjugorje by Nat Pagayonan

In the past when liners were not that yet big and fast we had very successful liners whose origins were as former RORO Cargo Ships. I think the most famous of these were the sister ships Our Lady of Sacred Heart and the Our Lady of Medjugorje of Carlos A. Gothong Lines Incorporated (CAGLI) which both came in 1990. Beautifully renovated, few suspected their true origins. Weighing the amenities of the ship, they were not inferior to liners of their size. And nor in speed although they have engine horsepowers less than the liners of their size.

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Butuan Bay 1 by Vinz Sanchez

It was the revived Carlos A. Gothong Lines (when they split from WG&A) which brought in the next batch of RORO Cargo ships for conversion into liner ROPAXes when they acquired the Butuan Bay 1 and the Ozamis Bay 1 in the early 2000’s. But what puzzled me is they forgot how to convert them into beautiful ROPAXes like before and almost everybody that rode them said they were ugly. And that maybe helped doom the return of Gothong Lines into passenger shipping. When Butuan Bay 1 became the Trans-Asia 5 it became a beautiful ship with first-class interiors. Butuan Bay 1 should have been like that from the very start and if it were, the trajectory of Gothong Lines might have been different (of course they had other problems too).

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Ozamis Bay 1 by Mike Baylon

It was the Asian Marine Transport Corporation or AMTC that next brought RORO Cargo ships here for conversion into RORO liners. In their Super Shuttle RORO series, they started with the first three converted in to ROPAXes and these were the small Super Shuttle RORO 1, Super Shuttle RORO 2 and Super Shuttle RORO 3. However, the conversions were also not done well and were not worthy of the beautiful small liners of the past. Were they scrimping too like the revived Carlos A. Gothong Lines? Or were they thinking more of the cargo than the passenger revenue?

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Super Shuttle RORO 1 by Fr. Bar Fabella

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Super Shuttle RORO 2 by Nowell Alcancia

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Super Shuttle RORO 3 by Mike Baylon

The next batch of Super Shuttle ROROs which were former RORO Cargo ships or variants from the Super Shuttle RORO 7 to Super Shuttle RORO 12 were all big, all former RORO Cargo ships but all were no longer converted in ROPAXes because maybe the first three of AMTC were not particularly successful. I was able to board all of them and their interiors were all good. The cabins for the vehicle drivers were still in good condition and being used along with ships’ drawing rooms and the good, functional galleys. Some even have gyms. Actually what was only needed is to maybe convert the top deck or another deck into good passenger accommodations. Our shipbuilders were good at that in the 1950’s and 1960’s when refrigerated cargo or cargo-passenger ships from Europe were converted into liners for Sulpicio Lines, William Lines and Sweet Lines aside from Compania Maritima.

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Super Shuttle RORO 7 by James Gabriel Verallo

The Super Shuttle RORO 7 and Super Shuttle RORO 8 were the two AMTC ships that were intriguing for me. At 145 and 146 meters length the size is good especially since this is a tall ship with at least 4 RORO decks. The original top sustained speeds are 17 and 17.5 knots from only 6,900 and 7,800 horsepower which is even less than the horsepowers of the Our Lady of Sacred Heart and the Our Lady of Medjugorje which both had top sustained speeds of 17 knots when new and did 16 knots here even with additional metal and age. If 16 knots can be coaxed from the small engines of the two AMTC ships then it might have been enough especially if compared to the speeds the former Cebu Ferries series converted liners are doing now. It will have a good container load with a decent passenger size if one deck is converted into passenger accommodations and the cabins for drivers are used for passengers here. I was hoping AMTC will go in that direction but they did not. It turned out AMTC was no longer interested in liner shipping and was more interested in container shipping and especially the loading of brand-new vehicles destined for car dealers in the south.

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Super Shuttle RORO 8 by Aris Refugio

A design speed or original top sustained speed of 15 or 16 knots might not do because converted here with additional metal and with age already they will probably just run at 13 or 14 knots and that is slow for a liner. 15 knots locally is still acceptable but 16 knots is better as proven by the Our Lady of Sacred Heart and Our Lady of Medjugorje. But then on the other hand the last time the former Cebu Ferry 2 ran as a liner to Cebu from Manila she was just being made to run at 14 to 15 knots. Does it mean that speed is already acceptable? That will mean a 28 or 29 hour run to Cebu versus the 22 hours of the big liners. But then passing through interports will mask that. Just feed the passengers well. And I always wondered why liners to Cebu don’t pass Roxas City anymore when it is just on the way. Of course the big ones can’t. At least 2GO tried Romblon port with the St. Anthony de Padua (the former Cebu Ferry 2) the last time around. But then maybe small liners shouldn’t be doing the Cebu route.

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St. Anthony of Padua by Mike Baylon

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St. Ignatius of Loyola by Mike Baylon

It was Aboitiz Transport System which next brought in RORO Cargo ships for conversion into ROPAXes with their Cebu Ferry 2 and Cebu Ferry 3. Originally these two ships were refitted to be overnight ferries but later when they were transferred out of their Cebu base they were refitted again to become liners. The two are known now as St. Anthony of Padua and St. Ignatius of Loyola under 2GO. Aside from the two, there are other RORO Cargo ships which were converted into ROPAXes but they were not liners but overnight ships. Among these are the Graceful Stars and Oroquieta Stars of Roble Shipping.

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The future Trans-Asia (1) by Mike Baylon

I think there are many RORO Cargo ships around that are about 120-130 meters in length that have a design speed of 18 or 19 knots which can still run here at 16.5 to 17.5 knots and they might just be perfect. I don’t know if that is the case of the Warrior Spirit which recently arrived to become the third Trans-Asia (1) of Trans-Asia Shipping Lines. This might be good as a test case. The length of 126.2 meters is perfect and the design speed is 19 knots from twin engines is also perfect. Trans-Asia Shipping Lines has a good record in conversion. But then she will just be an overnight ship but a big one at that. But the coming Panglao Bay 1 of Carlos A. Gothong Lines might not prove to be a test case as she will not be converted to ROPAX, per report.

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Panglao Bay 1 by Mark Ocul

Trying these former RORO Cargo ships for conversion into ROPAXes might be a safe bet. These RORO Cargo ships might be low-risk in acquisition as their purchases might just be above breaker prices. So if it does not make money the worth of metal as scrap might still pay for the acquisition price. In the future Trans-Asia (1) they are even cutting off metal so windows can be made. That is different from the experience of the Cebu Ferries ships were a lot of metal has to be added because decks have to built.

I think it is good time to try acquiring RORO Cargo ships as our future liners. They might turn out to be good bets and worthwhile liners a la Our Lady of Sacred Heart and Our Lady of Medjugorje.

My Northern Cebu Tour

When I was in Cebu I had the ambitious trip to cover Maya, Hagnaya and Tabuelan ports in one day. However, even though I started early I failed to cover all three ports. There was some glitch in my plan and simply put if a trip to Maya already takes five hours or so then with detours covering all three seems really iffy, if the plan had a glitch, which I only realized later.

I had no exact day for the trip and I only planned to do it when it is not raining heavily (in my eleven days in Cebu last January it was raining almost everyday) and I was able to wake up early. So one morning I got up at 4:40am and before 6am I was already in Cebu North Bus Terminal in Mandaue.

The first segment of my trip was to Bogo City bus terminal. Along the way, we passed the junction that leads to Tabuelan. Since I was early I was already tempted to go down but I held (but it turned out later that going first to Tabuelan was the correct move but I should have been earlier).

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When I reached the Bogo bus terminal I was disappointed. Not much bus spotting there as the red buses were no longer around (they said there’s still a few left). I walked to the beach to get whatever shipping shots I can get. Just small fishing boats but Polambato port was visible in the distance including two vessels, one of which was the Super Shuttle Ferry 10 of the Asian Marine Transport System or AMTC which holds the Bogo-Palompon route.

I then left the terminal and I decided I will no longer go to Polambato port to save on time. The Super Shuttle Ferry 10 is already familiar to PSSS members (since it stays a lot on the AMTC wharf being repaired) and most that will be added in case are just fishing vessels and viewers don’t have much taste for that anyway (ah, only for their catch, seriously).

In Daanbantayan it was a long drive among its many big, separated barrios. The scars of the legendary Typhoon “Yolanda” were still visible. We then reached Maya but the Ceres bus does not go into it anymore so I still have to take a motorcycle (it is not really a habal-habal). It is the Island Autobus that still goes direct to it and one bus was waiting there for the big motor bancas from Masbate and Leyte to arrive. Ceres goes direct to the new port now.

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The old port was still the same as in it basically serves the many motor bancas and motor boats of Maya. The port in general was unimproved. Most of the motor bancas there were for Malapascua, the resort island. The motor bancas for tourists was way more expensive than the flat-bottomed motor launches for the locals of the island.

It was windy and there were white caps and the news was the big motor banca from Esperanza, Masbate will be late. It is the only daily craft from Masbate as all other big Masbate motor bancas dock in Polambato port. Also expected but not yet there was the big motor banca from San Isidro, Leyte. Actually, banca pilots don’t need the Coast Guard when to exercise caution as they have much more experience at sea than they Coast Guard. They won’t sail if they think it is dangerous.

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I was amazed by the number of motor bancas to Malapascua. I did not expect to see well over a dozen crafts altho travel that day was slow maybe due to the weather (and so they are all there). In port, they were also rolling plastic drums of diesel into the RORO ramp for loading to a motor banca. I was surprised the drums do not burst. It is supposed to be the fuel for the generator of Malapascua. It was from a big truck.

From the old port the new port being constructed was visible. The access road to it was cut from a hill and a RORO port with back-up area is being constructed. It seems it is still a year from completion. But rumor is once completed the Masbate ROROs in Polambato will transfer there. Makes sense as Maya is nearer to Masbate being the northernmost point in Cebu. But I also bet Cawayan will then be the stronger connection to Masbate rather Cataingan because of the shorter distance.

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Maya new port

There were other ports in Daanbantayan which I saw from the bus along with a cove near Maya which seemed to have been a marina of motor boats before as there were carcasses there aside from live motor boats. It is just near and south of Daanbantayan town. The other ports I saw seems to be fishing ports. Fishing as an industry is very evident in Daanbantayan. Well, being just by the Visayan Sea will dictate that.

I took a local jeep from Maya and sat beside the driver. That gives me the chance of asking some questions. Mainly I was concerned with the rides (in Maya I had an oldtimer from Masbate as resource person). I changed ride in the Daanbantayan bus terminal where I also took bus photos. I did not go back to Bogo and instead I just waited for a ride in the junction to San Remigio town. It was already lunchtime, I noted. My fear of the day being eaten by the long ride from Cebu is beginning to materialize.

At times if my sugar is okay I decide to forego lunch to save on time and this is what I did again. I just take knick-knacks as I go to have some fuel to burn. I arrived in Hagnaya port at about 12:30pm and I immediately went to the port terminal to see what’s new, what changed. But it was full as the passengers of my bus were almost all headed to Bantayan island, I found out.

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I decided to just enter the port proper and reserve my terminal roaming at the end of my Hagnaya tour. I was glad I was in a non-ISPS port. No questions, easy access. It is good that in non-ISPS ports there are no imaginary terrorists (will a terrorist be taking shots of ships openly? but then ganyan kagunggong ang mga opisyal at guards sa ISPS ports).

The new bruited-about LCT of AMTC was there and her name is Super Shuttle Ferry 26. She was big and wide and built in South Korea. The only problem is she was not sailing because of a transmission problem. There were so many passengers in the port and I found out the reason was of the three AMTC ships in port were not sailing. The Coast Guard again declared a “gale” warning (now why do they declared a “gale” warning when there is no gale? why don’t they check the dictionary for the definition of a gale?).

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The suspension was for crafts below 250 gross tons and unfortunately the Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and the Super Shuttle Ferry 11 were both under that limit. And so all the passengers and car owners were waiting for the arrival of the Island Shipping LCT from Bantayan island. There was a cruiser ship of Island there, the Super Island Express II, their former Cebu-Tubigon ship (they have withdrawn from that route) but she was not sailing too. She is rumored to be for sale.

From inside the port I first went to the fishing vessels just north of Hagnaya port near where the buses park and wait. I was interested in the four steel-hulled fishing vessels that seemed to be derelict (but it seems they are still repairable). They were and it seems they did not survive well Typhoon “Yolanda”. From that location there was another view of Hagnaya port.

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I passed by but i decided to forego the Hagnaya meal place and burger stand as I did not want to lose time and I started walking the small road south of Hagnaya port. The first one I entered was what looked like a private port just near the Hagnaya boat. It had basnigs docked there plus a big motor banca, the Froilan B to an island near Negros already. It was the only boat to that island to Hagnaya and practically all the passengers were local. They said they are leaving anytime now. They were friendly.

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Froilan B on the right

From that private port there is a view of the ferries of AMTC especially Super Shuttle Ferry 11 which view was blocked by Super Shuttle Ferry 26. There was also a preview there of the fishing vessels docked south of Hagnaya port.

I walked south. I know I will find there the various private fishports and dockyards of Hagnaya. The first one I espied was just near and the one they were building looked familiar and so I went inside to ask. There was a “No Entry” sign but since I have something to ask that trumps that sign because it is impolite to howl from the outside.

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Yes, they build the Leonida fishing vessels that one will normally see in Polambato and Danao. They have that distinctive curving bridge in their vessels and actually their vessels are beautiful that I thought they were Japan surplus. Now I know why none of their vessels have IMO Numbers. Four vessels were being built there, two steel-hulled and two wooden-hulled. I thought they were not small if they can build four at the same time.

If the Leonida facility is small and all for vessel construction the next one I entered was big and it serves mainly as a fishport. This was where the Debbie Joy fishing vessels were docked (and there were a few there then). Got into an engaging talk there with someone of rank. They build their own vessels too. He said there were many shipwrights in Hagnaya and practically all are freelancers (that means not tied to a shipbuilding company). They are on call when needed and free. I understood it was a craft inherited from the generation past. Maybe that I why I saw welders only about 20 in age who already seemed to know their craft. Their gear does not indicate they are TESDA grads.

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Fish was being handled in that facility when I was there plus there were refitting works. What I noticed is the Navy patrol boat was also docked there. It seems the fishport waters was calmer and that is why they were there (is there free fish too?). Their crew kept looking into my gear. It was practically a staredown. I took a lot of shots past them for I can see in the distance a lot more of fishing vessels docked and what looked like fish landing areas too. I will not be surprised if there are refitting places there also or dockyards. It was then that I realized that the Hagnaya fishing industry is bigger than I initially supposed. What they have there I did not see in Daanbantayan or Bogo. Not even in Carmen, Cebu. Or in a lot of other ports, too.

Even in my 20’s I have already heard of Hagnaya in Bicol. Now I am beginning to understand. Hagnaya is not just a port. It is also a shipbuilding area. I won’t wonder now why the past database of MARINA showed a lot of routes from Hagnaya including to Masbate. It seems the yards were a show or a remnant of a great Hagnaya past. It just wonder why it is not the town.

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Fishing vessels south of Debbie Joy

The road got smaller and I decided I didn’t have the strength and the time to visit all those fish landing areas and dockyards. I thought that in the future there should be a shipspotting tour to discover that. I then walked back to the port and along the way I entered some lots which had an access to views of the fishing boats of Hagnaya.

From Hagnaya I intended to take a jeep or bus to Tabuelan port direct through the coastal road. I asked around. They said there’s none and I was puzzled. They offered a taxi for P400. I said that is too big for me although it looked like a fair price (later, James said there is a jeep but it emanates from San Remigio town). I calculated that if I go by the main road junction to Tabuelan it might already be 3pm or so when I reach Tabuelan port. I then decided to forego Tabuelan reasoning other members were capable of covering Tabuelan. Besides when I go shipspotting I am always mindful of my chances to take bus pictures to. All chances of that are ruined when darkness starts to set in.

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While mulling all these, the LCT Island II of Island Shipping arrived. I rushed back inside the port to take shots. Since I already decided to forego Tabuelan I tried to max my Hagnaya shipspot. It turned out to be a minor mistake. I did not know that at a certain hour all the bus departures in Hagnaya for Cebu are already tied to ship arrivals from Bantayan unlike when it was early afternoon. And since AMTC has no trips then the buses were all just waiting for Island Shipping arrivals.

I made a last roam of the inside of Hagnaya terminal. I concentrated on the Island Shipping ticketing office. I was attracted to their Hagnaya to Cawayan LCT (the LCT Island Venture) which I did not know before. Its fares were very cheap compared to the Bogo to Cataingan ship of Montenegro Lines when their distance difference is not great. Besides all fare are promo. If I use my senior citizen card I will just be paying P176. Now the comparative MSLI fare and discount would be about double or more of that.

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It seems passengers to Masbate have not yet discovered this cheap alternative. If it has a negative it is the 6am departure time. That means one has to leave Cebu North Bus Terminal no later than 2am.

When I got out of the terminal there was no more bus leaving and the next will be an hour later at 3pm. I then decided on an Island Express bus as I haven’t ridden that bus yet (it is a new bus service). I arrived in Cebu about 6:30pm in a light rain. I disembarked near Robinson’s Galleria and walked towards the Trans-Asia Shipping Lines office to get my ticket.

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I was in for a disappointment. Their Tagbilaran to Cagayan de Oro ships are no longer three times a week at MWF. It just leaves now on Mondays. There went my chance to shipspot Tubigon and Tagbilaran ports and get shots of Bohol buses. I then just asked for a Cebu to Cagayan de Oro passage aboard the Trans-Asia 9 (I was not able to board it because it was cancelled due to a “technical problem”).

In the ticketing office me and an imam tried to help a family going to Bukidnon to attend a burial. Passage was nil then because it was the day after the Sinulog Festival. Our advice fell into zero but I learned how the company handles situations such as this. They have a way and I was able to learn it. They guaranteed the family will be able to board the ship although it is supposedly completely full.

I then went home feeling tired from a trip that lasted nearly 15 hours. I realized tackling Maya from Cebu isn’t easy with its distance.

My First Cebu Tour Last December

My first Cebu tour in my long travel happened after I planed in to Cebu and I was met by Mark at the airport. After lunch there, instead of going to Cebu via Mandaue (and suffer its bad traffic), we made our way to Muelle Osmena in Lapu-lapu City to ride the Metro Ferry. Riding this ferry is the easiest way to cover the various ports and piers of Cebu from Ouano (House) up to Cebu Pier 2. From Pier 3, Mark and me went to the ticketing office of Roble Shipping to secure our passage to Baybay for our trip to Tacloban to be with the PSSS tour from Tacloban to Matnog and back.

After securing our tickets me and Mark parted ways in front of the new Robinson’s Galleria which is near Pier 4. I then haled a taxi for Ouano wharf near the Mandaue market but the driver said a car can’t enter Ouano with its deep muck. I assented but upon reaching the corner entering Ouano I directed him instead to the parallel road I once knew that was adjacent to the SMC Shipping & Lighterage facility that once was the alternate access to Ouano wharf.

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Turning right into that road, I was surprised it was full of trucks that will be loaded for Asian Marine Transport Corporation or AMTC. I thought I was mistaken but then we came to a gate bearing the AMTC mark. My driver asked for entry inside but the guard said I should just enter by myself. I paid my fare and soon I was already inside the new facility of AMTC, the wharf they transferred to after they were evicted from their former wharf in Pier 8. I can’t believe it was so easy to get in when the gate looked imposing from outside.

I asked about their Mandaue to Batangas trip inside one of their offices there which are converted container vans (but airconditioned). They said the Super Shuttle RORO 3 was just on trial voyage to Cagayan de Oro. That ship has not been running for about a year already but I was interested in it because it offers a direct and cheap passage to Batangas from Cebu and I have not dropped yet my plan to shipspot Batangas and Calapan. They gave me a number and they took my number but it became useless as there was no cellphone signal in the next days because of fears of bombings in the Sinulog activities.

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Snoopy inside the AMTC facility in Ouano

From the office I tried to make a round of the new facility of AMTC. There were actually some other customers inside their facility that were transacting rolling cargoes so I was not the only outsider. One thing I immediately noticed is the tanker Snoopy which supplies acid to San Miguel Corporation in Cebu was still docked in its usual place. Maybe part of the lease of AMTC with Ouano said it could not be touched.

It was not that easy to roam the new AMTC facility. The old road by the wharf was already destroyed by all the movements of the heavy equipment and the weight of the container vans. However, the inner portion when a container yard should be already has new concrete.

Docked there were the Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and the Super Shuttle RORO 9. It was the first time I saw the latter ship near. I made my way to Super Shuttle Ferry 3 and I was able to talk to a friendly officer. He said they were making some repairs because a previous typhoon dragged her anchor and she ended up beached. It happened when she had no crew onboard. They let me tour the ship and I was happy because I haven’t boarded yet this ship before. She was very similar to any other basic, short-distance ferry-RORO in terms of arrangement. Well, after all they came from one basic design in Japan.

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Though the Super Shuttle RORO 9 was just nearby I did not try to board her anymore. Too many people around there as there were works on the ship. I also was able to tour that ship already before. Besides, I also wanted to go to the other side of the fence to the remaining half of the old Ouano wharf by the market while there was still enough light. I also wanted to see the changes there, if there were any and photograph the ships there too.

I went out by foot and took a pedicab near the old wharf entrance. I found out that there was no way to get inside by foot as all footpaths are covered by deep muck. In the near portion were the usual ships doing Afloat Ship Repair (ASR) plus again some basnigs. The ships on ASR then were the Lite Ferry 7, the Filipinas Dinagat and the West Ocean 1. I found a friendly officer and so I boarded the Lite Ferry 7 again although I had already toured her before. There was no significant change inside her.

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Lite Ferry 7 and a basnig

On the far end by the wall dividing it and AMTC, I found the LCT Akira and the LCT Poseidon 19 docked. The Cargo RORO LCT Akira of Ocean Transport was discharging container vans. However, her access to their container yard was already cut off by the new AMTC facility and they have to use the muddy main road. I wonder if they were happy with the change. Meanwhile, LCT Poseidon 19 was just on standby without load or cargo movement.

The usual canteen that PSSS shipspotters patronize was still there and the wall of AMTC is touching its side already. So gone from the place were Eliezer Shipworks, a fine subcontractor for ship refitting works and the junk shop adjacent it. Feeling hungry and thirsty, I ordered merienda from the canteen. The lady there recalls me. She even asked where were my usual companions (it seems she remembers we order a lot of her softdrinks when we drop by her place).

Had a small talk with her. She said her business dropped 50% since the AMTC facility was built. She also said other contributary factors were the moving out of the Lite Ferries LCTs to the Ouano-House (that was the first time I knew they were no longer there). She said the passengers were complaining that with the muck one is forced to take the pedicab (whose drivers are taking advantage of the situation by doubling their fare to P20 for a distance of 200 meters; well, it is also hard going for them).

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I soon bade the canteen owner goodbye. I have to figure out a way how to get out since there were very few pedicabs and it was already near 5pm. Made my way to the market. There was no opening where a person can squeeze through. Now I know my only way now is to hitch a ride with one of the service vehicles going out. I was in luck that a Multicab was on the way out. They even gave to me the front seat and they wouldn’t want to accept any payment.

Finished my first day in Cebu by going to the Cebu North Bus Terminal to take bus pictures (can’t resist it as it was just on the way). I then went back to Robinson’s Galleria to take my knapsack. It was good Mark tipped me their hospitality service was still free. Soon my son was there to fetch me. Seamless.

I was really able to make full my first day in Cebu. And the extra trip to Ouano was well worth it as me and PSSS discovered what were the changes there.

I just rested next day for I know the next days will be consecutive long trips for me. It turned out to be one complete week of travel that was about 1,900 kilometers long including me and Mark’s trip from Baybay to Tacloban [I have reports on that already except for the Cebu to Tacloban section]. It broke my medical spell of no travel and this first-day tour of Cebu was the first part of it.

The Bogo Connection to Masbate

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Photo credits: Philippine Herald and Gorio Belen

In the old days, the Cebu connection to Masbate went from Cebu port. And among those that provided that connection were liner companies whose ships pass by Masbate first before heading to Cebu and northern Mindanao and from there their liners will retrace back the route. That is gone now and the last Manila liner that provided such connection was the Cebu Princess of Sulpicio Lines which stopped sailing in the aftermath of the Princess of the Stars‘ sinking in a typhoon in 2008. However, until a few months ago there were a ROPAX Cargo ship, the Super Shuttle RORO 3 of Asian Marine Transport Corporation that was running a route from Batangas to Cebu (Mandaue actually) and Cagayan de Oro via Masbate.

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Photo Credit: Wakanatsu

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Trans-Asia Shipping Lines also had an overnight ferry route from Cebu to Masbate since almost 40 years ago. That is gone now too, a victim of the decline of their fleet and now it is only Cokaliong Shipping Lines that has a Cebu-Masbate passenger service but it only runs once a week. Also long gone was the Palacio Lines’ route from Cebu to Placer, Masbate. But still around is the Lapu-lapu Shipping Lines’ route from Cebu to Cataingan, Masbate which is usually run by their Lapu-lapu Ferry 1, a cruiser ship.

In the past, wooden motor boats also did routes from various ports in Masbate to northern Cebu using the ports of Hagnaya, Maya and Polambato. The three are in San Remigio, Daanbantayan and Bogo towns, respectively. However, from the 1980’s, MARINA, the maritime regulatory agency, consistently pressured the wooden motor boats (the lancha) to retire citing them as “obsolete” and “unsafe”. Some had their franchises revoked and that practically ended the lives of the shipping companies owning them (many operate wooden motor boats because they can’t afford to buy steel-hulled ferries).

MARINA was so successful in that campaign that no motor boats still do a Cebu-Masbate route. What remained were the big passenger-cargo motor bancas which run until now (maybe these are “modern” and “safer” than the phased-out motor boats?). These motor bancas originate from Cawayan, Placer, Esperanza and Pio V. Corpus towns in Masbate. The eastern portion of Masbate island, by the way, is actually Cebuano-speaking and their economic tether is to Cebu. Their motor boats connect their people and their goods to Cebu. Some of their scions actually study in Cebu, too, and work there later on.

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Polambato port (Photo credit: James Gabriel Verallo)

This was the state of things when President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo pushed her Central Nautical Highway which pushed for ROROs. Since the nearest Maya port was in disrepair and there are issues of depth, the port of Polambato was designated as the connecting RORO port to Masbate. That was a two-birds-in-one-stone move as Polambato was already the connecting port to nothern Leyte via the Palompon port (it still is until now). So only one RORO port had two be developed for two routes. Neat but a route from Polambato is longer than a route from Maya port.

On the side of Masbate, two ports were offered as connection, the port of Cawayan on the southern side of Masbate island and the port of Cataingan on the southeastern end on the island in the protected Cataingan Bay. Cataingan port is the logical choice since it is actually the best port in eastern Masbate as it is considered the district port and it lies in a protected bay. In the past, it was a home of motor boats going to Cebu. It also has a shorter road distance to Masbate City, the main economic center of Masbate province and the take-off port of Masbate to the Bicol mainland. There was also an attempt for a two-birds-in-one-stone move there as Cataingan was also declared to be the Masbate port that will connect to Naval, Biliran and Leyte island.

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Cawayan port (Photo credit: Noel de Mesa)

Cawayan port, meanwhile, is a bit more distant from Masbate City and when the RORO route was opened its roads were in a worse state compared to the Cataingan-Masbate road which was at least asphalted though beginning to crack (now, however the roads of the two towns to Masbate are already improved). And in the Cataingan-Masbate road there are more towns and hence more commerce, more sources of produce and of course, passengers. But how come they still built the Cawayan RORO port? Well, maybe there was politics (I don’t know just where) and Gloria was actually too fond then of duplicate ports. It brings more income to you-know-where. So it was actually a one-bird-with-two-stones maneuver.

I also just wonder about the fate of Placer port on the southern side of Masbate island. In the past, Placer was the connecting port of the southern side of Masbate island to Cebu City. It is even closer to Bogo than Cawayan (or even Cataingan) and the RORO will be less broadsided by the habagat and amihan waves in that route. They said there is an issue with the port with regards to depth but it was never clear to me (again was there politics?). Whatever, Cawayan won out over Placer and that was that. One’s fate and progress can really just be decided in an instant in Manila and NEDA, the validator of projects is actually just a stamp pad.

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Cataingan port

Montenegro Shipping Lines Inc. (MSLI) pioneered the Polambato (Bogo) to Cataingan route. Among its early clients were its own ROROBus intermodal buses doing a Manila-Cebu route via Masbate. Meanwhile, it was the Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) that pioneered the Polambato (Bogo) to Cawayan route with their Super Shuttle Ferry 19, a double-ended ferry. Montenegro Lines used a rotation of ferries in the Bogo-Cataingan route while Super Shuttle Ferry 19 is sometimes not in the route and none is running at times as AMTC lacked ships as the years went by because they lose ships (as in hull losses) and also because of ship unreliability.

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The ferry next bigger to the basic, short-distance ferry-RORO in Polambato (Photo credit: John Carlos Cabanillas)

Both routes are still running now and Montenegro Lines even tried a twice a day sailing but settled with a once a day sailing with a ship next bigger in size to the basic, short-distance ferry-RORO, the starting ship of both routes (or a modernized LCT at times). Lately, however, Asian Marine Transport Corporation sold out both its ships and its route to Cawayan and Super Shuttle Ferry 19 became the Cawayan Ferry 1 of the new company D. Olmilla Shipping Corporation. The Bogo-Cawayan route, as a note, still has no intermodal bus and it is the weaker of the two. I heavily doubt if it can overtake Cataingan.

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Cawayan Ferry 1 (Photo credit: James Gabriel Verallo)

Even with these two routes running, the motor bancas of Masbate still sail regularly to Bogo and Maya. These motor bancas sometimes carry hogs (in a deck below the passenger deck) and that is a commodity not acceptable to MSLI or AMTC unless it is loaded in trucks and even then it will only be loaded with reluctance (as their passengers might complain of the smell in the 6-hour voyage). And besides, the passengers and the cargo of the motor bancas enjoy a point-to-point direct sailing with no land transfer (the ROROs doesn’t go to Placer or Esperanza). It might even stop offshore near a remote barrio and the passenger and cargo will be transferred to his own motor banca. Bookings can also be done informally (and even by cellphone). A passenger from Placer can be picked up by the Cawayan boat at sea if they receive a validated text message and if there is no motor banca from Placer.

Though affected by the development of the Bogo-Cataingan route, the Cataingan-Cebu ship of Lapu-lapu Shipping is still running. Its service of loading frozen fish in styrofoam boxes without using trucks can’t still be equaled by the Cataingan-Bogo RORO as a truck would be needed from Bogo. They send it out by Lapu-lapu Ferry 1 and it will just be picked up by the customer in Cebu Pier 3 and the empty boxes will be loaded by the customer in the return trip. Sometimes, the advantage of a RORO is overstated by the government which is always pushing it. How can shipping 2 or 3 styrofoam boxes be sulit using a truck or a Multicab?

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Lapu-lapu Ferry 1 in Cataingan port

The route from Cebu via Masbate to Manila is not cheaper compared to the Cebu to Manila route via Leyte and Samar although looks shorter on the map. That was found out by a Swiss member of PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society) member who did both routes in the same month. The RORO rates via Masbate is high because there is lack of competition and maybe the sea crossing is longer if the Bogo-Palompon route is taken as the comparison. Meanwhile the rates via Leyte and Samar are cheaper and sometimes there are discounting plus there is the cheap Cargo RORO LCTs. However, the land route through it is some 225 kilometers longer compared to a Pilar, Sorsogon route and 265 kilometers via a Pio Duran, Masbate that both uses Masbate.

Whatever, the Bogo routes will definitely stick. That is what was shown by the last decade. Well, unless it is supersed by the Maya port which is under construction now. It might not necessarily be cheap but there are people and goods that has Masbate as a destination (and newbies who will think it is cheaper through there since it looks nearer on the map). And there are those who will still prefer the shorter route and just save on time. And also save on wear on the vehicles and the driver. And arrive earlier and for truck owners save on wages and have their trucks be available for an extra day.

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Maya port (Photo credit: bUs sPoTTeRs

If only their rates are more competitive then maybe the Bogo connection will be flying now.

The DavSam Link and DavSam II

Once upon a time, after the LCT Davao del Norte which was owned by the Provincial Government of Davao del Norte sank, it was only the Mae Wess/CW Cole ferries that were running the Davao-Samal route through their own wharves in Sasa in Davao and Caliclic in Samal. Their ferries sailed after every 15 or 20 minutes but during Fridays and weekends their ferries can’t cope and a long queue of vehicles waiting to be loaded form and it lines up to the main vehicle gate of Sasa port about half a kilometer away. Vehicles wait and queue for hours under the hot sun and most of these are private cars.

Even with this discomfort, the drivers happily paid the rates of Mae Wess. They don’t realize it that Mae Wess was actually charging them sky-high rates. This can be computed by dividing the RORO rate by the distance in nautical miles. In this method, Mae Wess charges the highest in the country, bar none but those going to Samal didn’t know because they have no comparison. They rarely venture into Lipata port, Mukas port or Zamboanga port where they can find rates that are more reasonable.

Meanwhile, Kudos Trucking has long been a player in Davao in a supplementary role in shipping. They are haulers of container vans and in renting yard space for container vans. Most of their clients are foreign shipping companies and they operate several container yards including one just across the Mae Wess wharf in Sasa, Davao. Then a few years ago they built a wharf or port in Panacan, Davao which has a back-up area for container vans. Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) was the first to use this wharf for their Cargo RORO ships and their container vans.

With their own wharf in Panacan and the availability of the Babak port just across them in Pakiputan Strait, Kudos Trucking decided to go into the RORO business. After all, Babak port has lost its RORO since LCT Davao del Norte was lost. So, they then barter-chartered two LCTs from Asian Marine Transport Corporation and these were the Super Shuttle RORO 16 and Super Shuttle RORO 14 which arrived in 2013 and 2014. The name of the new shipping company is DavSam Link which is a self-explanatory name.

On the first day when DavSam Link will start operations, the local head of MARINA (Maritime Industries Authority), the Philippine maritime regulatory agency came to Kudos Trucking Corporation wharf and told DavSam Link they should charge the same rate as Mae Wess which was P300 for a sedan. I was among the two ship spotters there covering the opening for PSSS (Philippine Ship Spotters Society), the premiere and the authoritative ship spotting organization in the Philippines which has international links and so I came to know that. DavSam Link wanted then to charge lower. Now, isn’t that what newcomers need to do to gain business? Discounting is done everywhere – in malls, supermarkets, restaurants, hotels, by the plane companies and even by the great 2GO shipping company, etc. The MARINA head did not know that?

Immediately, I knew what the MARINA honcho was protecting was the interest of Mae Wess and not the interest of the public. In all my travels in the whole breadth of the Philippines the RORO rate of Mae Wess was the highest per nautical mile and there was not even a close second and it is the local MARINA was the one which approved it. In many RORO routes there is no such thing as rate parity. That is especially true in Cebu where the lowest charge for the Cebu-Leyte route is only half of those that charge the highest (and there is no need to say which are growing). Maybe the rate should be high enough so that there should be a spare for “gifts” for them? The MARINA honcho obviously has forgotten who are paying their salaries and allowances.

DavSam Link began sailing with rate parity with Mae Wess. With no advantage to show and with people used to the fast departures of Mae Wess they had a very poor start. For truckers there is another disadvantage because an agent of Mae Wess who is in power in Samal threatens no loading if they ever patronize DavSam Link (in the end the truckers did not heed this). This island which calls itself a “garden city” is actually full of illegal exactions on passengers and vehicles which has long been outlawed by the Supreme Court and reiterated by 4 DILG (Department of the Interior and Local Governments) memorandums. Well, in the Philippines unless some mayors and councils are sent to jail, it seems those memorandums are just sheets with the same value as toilet paper. Will this change under President Rodrigo Roa Duterte?

Moreover, the LCTs sent by Asian Marine Transport Corporation to DavSam Link proved uncooperative and broke down with regularity. It got so bad that at one time DavSam Link did not sail for 8 months especially when they sent back the Super Shuttle Ferry 14 and the engine of Super Shuttle Ferry 16 permanently conked out after they hired some former crewmen of Mae Wess (well, I am just stating facts). Some then thought DavSam Link might have been gone for good and defeated in the war with Mae Wess but they might not have been aware of the depths of pockets and will of one Johnny Ng.

Super Shuttle Ferry 16 was sent to General Santos City for re-engining with a brand-new China-made Weichai marine engine (their local agent, the Dynamic Power of Mandaue, Cebu has an office there). Just before Super Shuttle Ferry 16 came back as the DavSam I with a new engine (by then DavSam Link has already bought her from Asian Marine Transport Corporation), a true double-ended ferry arrived from Japan for DavSam Link and she was named as the DavSam II. This was July of 2015.

DavSam II did not sail immediately because she had no meaningful passenger accommodations. It seems in Japan she only sails very short distances and so maybe the passengers just stay in their cars, in the main. A small passenger accommodation of glass and aluminum was then built and it was airconditioned because it was very exposed to the sun. The ferry was also repainted and generally spiffed up but not by much as she arrived as a clean ship and not from a laid-up condition. Well, if a small ferry can sail all the way from Japan then it can be assumed it is in good condition.

The DavSam II was the former ferry Tateishi in Japan with the permanent ID IMO 9004035. She was built by Naikai Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd. in Setoda yard in 1990. The ship is a double-ended RORO which means she is fitted with ramps on both ends and so both ends look the same anyway. In this type of ship there is no clear bow and stern as she can sail both ways. A RORO of this type might have only one engine but it has propellers and rudders on both ends. The advantage of a true double-ended RORO is she does not need to back up and change direction after leaving port (which means she can then “back up” all the way to the other port). This type of ferry is only used on very short distances as the drag of the propellers on the front end when sailing can be significant if used on longer distances and the advantage of not having to back up and turn is then lost.

The external dimensions of the ship are 32.8 meters length over-all (LOA), 23.9 meters length between perpendiculars (LPP) by 10.6 meters Breadth and 3.0 meters Depth. The cubic measurement is 144 gross tons and the load capacity is 102 deadweight tons. The ship is equipped with a single Yanmar Marine engine of 490 horsepower with two transmissions, two shafts and two propellers. She has raked stem and stern with ramps and her top speed is 9 knots. The ship has a small pilot house suspended atop the car deck and in there still intact is her build plate. A basic RORO, the ingress and egress of the vehicles also serves as the entrance and exit of the passengers.

She arrived with her engine still in very good condition. We heard she was found a long way from Tokyo and maybe she was really only used on very short distances with only few trips a day and that is why her engine was still pristine. Usually this is the type of ferry used to connect islets within the Inland Sea. We heard DavSam Link was able to purchase her for a very good price. The company is very satisfied with her and so it is looking for another double-ended ferry. And with only a 490 horsepower engine she is a fuel miser. Her conduction voyage from Japan took only 4 days without any incident.

She is sailing very regularly in the hours when there is light and until dusk. Where DavSam I has days off because of some mechanical glitches, DavSam II is always sailing. They have reduced the rolling rates for sedan now to P200 from P300 which is actually still high and the passenger fares were reduced to P7 from P10 (funny her fares are even lower than the jeepney fare in Davao). The truck rates which depends on size are also way down from what was once the standard in the Davao-Samal route. And to me it can even be chopped off if only DavSam ferries is always full. Their ship is actually seldom full and their better days are just the weekends or holidays as Samal functions as a getaway of the Dabawenyos. Aside from the tourists from other places, of course.

Now it seems vehicle owners and truckers are beginning to realize that Mae Wess has been overcharging them for too long (but there is no backlash). Where there is monopoly it is known abuse is not far off especially if the regulator is inside the pockets of the operator. They will then try to charge as much as the market will bear. The rates and fares of DavSam Link are now lower than that of Mae Wess even though its route is a little longer since they follow a boomerang route because of the shallows in Pakiputan Strait.

DavSam I is a beautiful ship. Her patronage is somewhat okay now. It seems she might be headed for a successful career here.

For me, I hope she even charges lower.

The Cargo RORO Specialist of the Philippines

Cargo RORO (or RORO Cargo) ships are vessels that carry rolling cargo (light and heavy vehicles or container vans on chassis) and tracked vehicles like heavy equipment. For that, these ships have ramps and several levels of car decks connected by ramps on the inside or by lifts. They basically differ from container ships on two counts. One, the Cargo RORO ships wheel in their load while container ships handle their load LOLO (Load On, Load Off). In layman’s term that means lifting the container vans by the use of booms or by gantry cranes (sometimes a reach stacker or cranes are also used). Second, a significant number of the load of Cargo RORO ships are vehicles. Since those vehicles have drivers in many cases, Cargo RORO ships have a small passenger accommodations (mainly small cabins) for the owners or the truckers. Some amenities are provided for them too.

Cargo RORO ships differ from Pure Car Carriers (PCCs) and vehicle carriers in that the latter two basically carry new vehicles for delivery to overseas divisions of car companies and to car dealers. So in general the two latter-named are accompanied by just a few drivers or maybe by none at all.

In the world, it is in Europe where there is a highest concentration of Cargo RORO ships. It spans from Northern Europe to Southern Europe and the Mediterranean Sea which connects Europe to North Africa. Even the Black Sea has Cargo RORO ships. These Cargo RORO ships of Europe serve as the “bridges of the sea” for the European truckers and the tourists who brought along their vehicles.

Japan also has Cargo RORO ships but not to the extent of the proliferation in Europe. Other areas of the world also have that kind of ship but also not to the extent of concentration of Europe.

Cargo RORO or RORO Cargo ships have not been used before in any significant number in the Philippines. Those that came before were converted to RORO-passenger (ROPAX) ships like what Carlos A. Gothong Lines did with the MV Our Lady of Sacred Heart and MV Our Lady of Medjugorje. Before the two came, there was the MV Wilcon 1 and MV Wilcon 4 of William Lines and the MV Sinulog of Escano Lines but those were ROLO Cargo or Cargo LOLO ships which means they have ramps for rolling cargo and cargo booms for the container vans. The three had limited passenger accommodations and are all gone now. In recent years there were also a few ROLO Cargo ships that were acquired by other shipping companies but they do not carry passengers.

The first local shipping company that invested in a series of Cargo RORO ships was Sulpicio Lines. Between 1997 and 2002 that company acquired the MV Sulpicio Express Uno, the MV Sulpicio Express Dos and the MV Sulpicio Express Tres. However, those three Cargo RORO ships are now all gone to the breakers and only recently. Maybe Philippine Span Asia Carrier Corp. (PSACC), the current name now of Sulpicio Lines realized that the engines of the three were too big for its container capacity.

In recent years, there was a shipping company which seems to have decided they will make their mark in using Cargo RORO ships. This is the Asian Marine Transport Corporation (AMTC) of Cebu. Their first three ships in their Super Shuttle RORO series were either Cargo RORO ships or vehicle carriers. However, they converted all three as RORO-Passenger (ROPAX) ships here but their passenger capacities were not as big as MV Our Lady of Sacred Heart and MV Our Lady of Medjugorje. Maybe that decision was affected by the fact that liner passengers are no longer as numerous compared to the 1990’s and that they were just beginning in liner shipping (but in short-distance RORO shipping they have already been awhile already).

Starting with the next ship in the series, the MV Super Shuttle RORO 5, Asian Marine Transport no longer converted the ship to carry passengers. And this became the pattern from MV Super Shuttle RORO 6 (which was a barge carrier and not a Cargo RORO ship) to MV Super Shuttle RORO 12 (which were all Cargo RORO ships). Recently, an MV Super Shuttle RORO 14 arrived for them which has not yet been refitted. There is no Super Shuttle RORO 4 or 13 in the series because those numbers supposedly bring bad luck. Meanwhile, MV Super Shuttle RORO 6 is not sailing because of an engine room fire while in the shipyard and it is not sailing because of a dispute in the settlement between the company and the shipyard.

All the Cargo RORO ships of Asian Marine Transport Corp. (AMTC) from “5” to “14” were just acquired starting in 2012. So that means the push of AMTC in container shipping was relatively recent (but the first three in the series can also carry container vans but they were not yet big then in container shipping). Their container vans are brand-new and most were chartered from Waterfront Leasing, a company specializing in the rental of container vans.

These Cargo RORO ships of Asian Marine Transport Corp. were all built in Europe except for MV Super Shuttle RORO 7 and the MV Super Shuttle RORO 11 which were built in Japan. Although the ships are no longer young, all are still sailing reliably except for the fire-hit MV Super Shuttle RORO 6. Generally, the load of the ships are container vans, both aboard chassis and not. Cars and SUVs (sports utility vehicles) are also loaded and the bulk of these are brand-new and which are destined for car dealers in Visayas and Mindanao.

The ports of origin of the Cargo RORO ships of Asian Marine Transport Corp. are Manila and Batangas. Most of their Cargo RORO ships would then call in Cebu. They also have a route that passes through Iloilo and Bacolod. Their ports of call in Mindanao are Davao, General Santos City, Zamboanga, Cagayan de Oro and Nasipit.

The Cargo RORO ships of Asian Marine Transport Corp. are not cargo liners in the strict sense of the word as they can be flexible in departures according to the load and their route assignment is not really fixed and it is sometimes intervened by radio from the main office. That also means their arrivals in a particular port are also not fixed.

These are the particulars of the Cargo RORO ships of Asian Marine Transport Corporation:

Super Shuttle RORO 5 (arrived 2012)

Original name is Tajura. IMO 7822500.

Built by Neue Schlichting Werft in Travemunde, Germany in 1980.

Dimensions are 114.0 meters by 17.5 meters by 11.7 meters.

Dimensional weights are 6,105 gross tons and 2,900 deadweight tons.

Engines and Speed: 2 X 2,200hp MaK diesels. 16 knots top speed, originally.

Super Shuttle RORO 6 (arrived 2012)

Original name is Este Submerger II of J. Hauschildt. IMO 8324701.

Built by Rickmers in Bremerhaven, Germany in 1984.

Dimensions are 106.0 meters by 19.6 meters by 10.9 meters.

Dimensional weights are 6,786 gross tons and 4,490 deadweight tons.

Engines and Speed: 2 x 1,820hp Krupp-MaK diesels. 13 knots top speed.

Super Shuttle RORO 7 (arrived 2012)

Original name is Dia Ace. IMO 9117727.

Built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Shimoneseki, Japan in 1994.

Dimensions are 146.0 meters by 23.4 meters by 13.2 meters.

Dimensional weights are 13,540 gross tons and 4,339 deadweight tons.

Engine and Speed: 1 x 6,900hp NKK-Pielstick diesel. 17 knots top speed.

Super Shuttle RORO 8 (arrived 2012)

Original name is Dana Cimbria. IMO 8413992.

Built by Frederikshavns Vft in Frederikshavns, Denmark in 1986.

Dimensions are 145.0 meters by 21.6 meters by 12.1 meters.

Dimensional weights are 12,189 gross tons and 6,897 deadweight tons.

Engine and Speed: 1 x 7,800hp MaK diesel. 17.5 knots top speed, originally.

Super Shuttle RORO 9 (arrived 2013)

Original name is Bore Queen of Bore Line. IMO 7902647.

Built by Rauma-Repola in Rauma, Finland in 1980.

Dimensions are 170.9 meters by 23.0 meters by 17.5 meters.

Dimensional weights are 17,884 gross tons and 11,400 deadweight tons.

Engines and Speed: 2 MaK diesels. Total: 16,000hp. 19 knots top speed.

Super Shuttle RORO 10 (arrived 2014)

Original name is Finnmerchant. IMO 8020684.

Built by Rauma-Repole in Rauma, Finland in 1982.

Dimensions are 157.6 meters by 25.3 meters by 17.3 meters.

Dimensional weights are 20,865 gross tons and 13,866 deadweight tons.

Engines and Speed: 2 x 7,500hp Wartsila diesels. 19 knots top speed.

Super Shuttle RORO 11 (arrived 2014)

Original name is Dana Caribia. IMO 7725166.

Built by Nippon Kokan KK in Shimizu, Japan in 1979.

Dimensions are 161.4 meters by 24.2 meters by 14.3 meters.

Dimensional weights are 14,805 gross tons and 10,470 deadweight tons.

Engines and Speed: 2 x 3,950hp Burmeister & Wain (B&W) diesels. 15 knots.

Super Shuttle RORO 12 (arrived 2015)

Original name is Mercandian Gigant of Per Henriksen. IMO 8222733.

Built by Danyard A/S in Frederikshavn, Denmark in 1984.

Dimensions are 160.5 meters by 20.7 meters by 12.3 meters.

Dimensional weights are 14,410 gross tons and 9,200 deadweight tons.

Engine and Speed: 1 x 6,500 Mak diesel. 16 knots top speed, originally.

This ship was formerly the ROCON I of William Lines which came in 1995. In the great merger that produced the WG&A Philippines she was renamed to SuperRORO 200. She was sold abroad in 1997.

Super Shuttle RORO 14 (arrived 2016)

Original name is Mercury Ace. IMO 8509466.

Built by Usuki Tekkosho in Usuki, Japan in 1985.

Dimensions are 96.9 meters x 20.2 meters.

Dimensional weights are 6,974 gross tons and 3,199 deadweight tons.

Engine and Speed: 1 marine diesel. 13.5 top speed, originally.

A total of 9 Cargo RORO ships. The purchases of those Cargo RORO ships were mainly backed by the government-owned Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP).

In the main, each carry about 300 TEUs in a voyage plus vehicles in the top deck (and some on the bottom deck at the engine level). Asian Marine Transport System now has a spic and span terminal in Batangas under the name of Super Shuttle RORO, a brand they are now developing. In Cebu, however, they are looking for a new hub as they are leaving their old hub and port in Pier 8 in Mandaue, Cebu.

I just hope Asian Marine Transport System don’t find the engine size/fuel consumption to container capacity of the Cargo ROROs difficult to manage. With the way they are running the ships where there are long in-port hours, the advantage of Cargo RORO ships which is fast loading and unloading is in the main neutralized. They sometimes sail on one engine to save on fuel but one advantage of their fleet is it has the speed to turn or when needed. Container ships in the Philippines might have small engines but they don’t have the speed really (except for a few). On one hand though their top decks (and bottom decks) are really good for carrying vehicles and that is their advantage over the container ships.

This Cargo RORO experiment of Asian Marine Transport System is worth watching and studying.