When A Lackluster Shipping Company Became A Successful Motorcycle Company

The Pan-Oriental Shipping Company was one of the shipping companies that rose in Cebu after World War II, one of the replacements of the Cebu shipping companies that did not survive the war. This shipping company was among those who were able to purchase surplus World War II ships tendered by the Philippine Government. These are the ships given to the Philippines by the US to jump start the economy and not among those given as replacement for the ships lost during the war or the ships they ordered scuttled to prevent it from falling into the enemy hands and be used against the Allies. The ships were also atonement for the massive air attacks against the Japanese that practically wiped out many of the infrastructure of Manila.

POS

From the Manila Chronicle  1/13/52. Research by Gorio Belen of PSSS in the National Library.

The Pan-Oriental Shipping Co. started operations in 1948 doing the Cebu-Manila v.v. route. Like some of the other ships then, there were modifications carried out in the superstructure to accommodate passengers (the surplus Army transports were actually not people carriers). It did not have the sophistication, if that term is appropriate, of similar ex-“FS” ships of the major shipping lines.

The first passenger-cargo ship (I am leery of using the world “liner” here) of the Pan-Oriental Shipping was the Oriental that was acquired in 1948 and the name is not a surprise, of course. She was the former “FS”ship FS-318 built by John H. Mathis & Company Shipbuilders in Camden, New Jersey, USA in 1944 for the US Army as its own transport and in the main they were manned by US Coast Guard personnel.

Oriental

The MV Oriental. From the Manila Chronicle  1/13/52. Research by Gorio Belen of PSSS in the National Library.

The Oriental’s Length Over-all (LOA) was 53.9 meters with a Length Between Perpendiculars (LPP) of 50.7 meters and Breadth of 9.8 meters. The Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) of the ship remained at 560 tons even though there were additions to the superstructure. Weighed down by additional metal and for greater stability, her Depth rose from 3.2 meters to 4.3 meters. The ship was powered by two General Motors engines with a total of 1,000 horsepower that gave her a speed of 11 knots.  The permanent ID latter given to the Oriental was IMO Number 5264895.

Pan-Oriental Shipping’s next acquisition came in the next year, 1949, and this was the former “FS” ship FS-350 which was built by J.K. Welding in Yonkers, New York, USA in 1944 for the US Army, too. In the Pan-Oriental fleet she was named as the Occidental. The name is not surprising also.

Occidental

The MV Occidental. From the Manila Chronicle 12/3/53 (the attached date is incorrect). Research of Gorio Belen of PSSS in the National Library.

The Occidental’s external dimensions were exactly the same as that of the Oriental but the Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) is only 558 tons. That was after there were additions to the superstructure (funny, isn’t it?) The ship was also powered by two General Motors engines with a total of 1,000 horsepower that gave her a similar speed of 11 knots.  The IMO Number of the ship was 5260045.

After another year, in 1950, the Pan-Oriental Shipping acquired their third ship which was also another former “FS” ship, the FS-197 which was built by Higgins in New Orleans, Louisiana for the US Army too in 1944. Higgins was the company that designed and built the famous Higgins boat which was used as beach assault craft in World War II. In the Pan-Oriental fleet the FS-197 was named as the Continental.

Continental

The MV Continental. Research by Gorio Belen of PSSS in the National Library.

This ship was a little longer than the Oriental and Occidental at 54.9 meters LOA with an LPP of 51.2 meters and the common Breadth of 9.8 meters of all the FS ships. With additional metal the GRT of Continental went down from 573 tons to 512 tons (so GRT shaving was not a recent phenomenon). The ship is powered by two General Motors engines with 1,000 horsepower on tap giving her a cruising speed of 11 knots. The IMO Number of the ship was 6117935.

The Oriental, Occidental and Continental being all former “FS” ships were all sister ships. The ships were purchased from the Philippine Government through the Rehabilitation Finance Corporation (RFC) which was a predecessor of the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP). As mentioned before, US Government gave it to the Philippines to help the economy recover from the war.

The sole route of the Pan-Oriental ships was Manila-Cebu, v.v. and they stressed cargo rather than passengers. However, as time went by there were already plenty of ships calling in Cebu from Manila as Cebu is an in-port of ships still proceeding to Mindanao.  After all, they have to carry and supply the Cebuano migrants in that land of opportunity but that resulted in the displacements on the natives of the island.

Having a ship with just a sole port of call was actually disadvantageous as it does not maximize the ship. And that was compounded by just a once a week sailing. Competitors, on a once a week schedule with calls in Cebu, Tagbilaran, Dumaguete, Ozamis and Iligan can also do a once a week sailing

In 1954, after six years of operation, the Pan-Oriental Shipping quit the shipping business by selling out altogether lock, stock and barrel. The Oriental and Occidental went to Carlos Go Thong & Co. while the Continental went to Compania Maritima in the end after several transfers. With the sale of the two ships to Go Thong & Co., that company became a national liner company from being just a regional shipping company. Initially, Oriental and Occidental retained their names in the Go Thong fleet. After several years, the Oriental was renamed to the Don Jose and the Occidental was renamed to the Don Francisco. Meanwhile, the Continental became the second Basilan of Compania Maritima. All three had new superstructures in their new companies.

1963-4-29 Everett & Go Thong

From the Philippine Herald. Research by Gorio Belen of PSSS in the National Library.

The Pan-Oriental Shipping Company was owned by Norberto Quisumbing (sounds familiar?). After selling the company he founded Norkis in Mactan island (in Opon, now Lapu-lapu City) which assembles the well-liked and popular Yamaha motorcycles. Everybody knows how successful were the Quisumbings in motorcycles. And that is also true for Go Thong (later Gothong) in shipping and later they spawned the legendary Sulpicio Lines Incorporrated and Lorenzo Shipping Company.

The transaction between Pan-Oriental and Go Thong proved to be a win-win deal for the two companies.

 

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