The Danica Joy

The Danica Joy is a ship that has no number actually and is different from the lost Danica Joy-2 which capsized in Zamboanga Port while unloading its cargo. The Danica Joy is owned by the Aleson Shipping Lines of Zamboanga and she is actually the oldest ship in their fleet now after the retirement of the cruiser ferries Estrella del Mar and Neveen. But the Danica Joy is not really the second ship of Aleson Shipping. It just so happened that she was able to outlast her contemporaries in the fleet of Aleson Shipping Lines and for me that is already a feat on its own. Counting, she will be celebrating her silver anniversary (25 years) this year (2017) in the company.

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The ship Danica Joy was a former ferry in Japan like most of our steel-hulled ferries. She was built by Nakamura Shipbuilding & Engine Works in Yanai yard in 1972 as the ferry Nakajima of the Nakajima Kisen K.K with the IMO Number 7852414. Her route then was to Matsuyama, the biggest city in the Shikoku island of Japan. However, when the new Nakajima arrived for the company in 1994, she was retired and sold to the Philippines specifically to Aleson Shipping Lines which then proceeded to refit and remodel her in Zamboanga City into an overnight ferry with bunks and she was henchforth renamed into the Danica Joy.

The Danica Joy was the first “big” RORO of Aleson Shipping. “Big” because she was not really big in the true sense. It just so happened that she was bigger than the other ROROs of the Aleson fleet then. In the 1990’s Aleson Shipping was already converting into ROROs like most shipping lines then in the country. However, the sizes of the ROROs in the fleet of Aleson Shipping then was the size of the basic, short-distance ferry-ROROs with the exception of the Danica Joy (the Aleson Zamboanga, a cruiser ferry, and an earlier acquisition of Aleson Shipping from Carlos A. Gothong Lines was actually bigger than her but maybe not in Gross Tonnage, unofficially).

The external measurements locally of the Danica Joy is 48.0 meters Length, 11.3 meters Beam and 3.7 meters Depth and officially she has 493 in Gross Tonnage (GT) which is just the same as her Gross Register Tonnage (GRT) in Japan although additional structures were built into her that should have increased her GT. Her Net Tonnage (NT) is 245 and her load capacity is 218 Deadweight Tons. She is powered by two Daihatsu engines with a total of 2,000 horsepower giving her a sustained top speed of 14 knots when she was still new. The Call Sign of Danica Joy is DUJ2051 but she has no MMSI Number.

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The ship has a steel hull with car ramps at the bow and stern leading to a single car deck. She has two masts and two funnels. Her stem is raked and her stern is transom. Danica Joy has two passenger decks in a combination of bunks and seats. She has a Tourist accommodation aside from Economy and the ferry’s passenger capacity is 448 persons. This ferry has actually many sister ships in the Philippines. Among those are the Lite Ferry 6 of Lite Ferries, the former Salve Juliana of MBRS Shipping Lines which came here earlier in 1990, the Lite Ferry 1 and Lite Ferry 2, also both of Lite Ferries and Danilo Lines before (as the former Danilo 1 and Danilo 2). Both the Danilo ships also came into the country before her.

Danica Joy‘s first established route was Zamboanga City to Sandakan in Sabah, Malaysia. This was a response to the launching of the sub-regional grouping BIMP-EAGA (Brunei Darussalam-Indonesia-Malaysia-Philippines East Asia Growth Area) in 1994. It was a ship not only used for cargo which were mainly what is called as “barter goods” in the Philippines but also for carrying people and many of those were migrant workers and visitors to kins in Sabah. On that year, Danica Joy was the only Philippine ferry that has an international route. However, Sandakan was not the exclusive route of Danica Joy as she was also used in local routes.

In 1996 with the arrival of the bigger and faster Lady Mary Joy (which is a dead ship now and has no number too and is a different ship from the current Lady Mary Joy 1), Danica Joy became mainly a local ship and used on the long routes of Aleson Shipping which means Jolo and Bongao but not Pagadian. She was a valuable ship for Aleson Shipping in these long routes, a workhorse in fact because Danica Joy has no pair until the Danica Joy-2 arrived in 1998. The two had no relievers until 2004 when the Kristel Jane-3 arrived (this ship is still in the Bongao, Tawi-tawi route). She and her namesake Danica Joy-2 which is sometimes mistaken for her shouldered on in these routes until Trisha Kerstin-1 arrived in 2006 and Trisha Kerstin 2 arrived in 2008.

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Danica Joy is the ship fronted by the truck (in Zamboanga Port)

But this long shouldering took a toll on Danica Joy (and also Danica Joy-2 a little later) and her engines began to get unreliable after nearly 15 years of local sailing added to her 22 years of sailing in Japan. However, the second-generation owners of Aleson Shipping who seem to be more aggressive than the first generation (good for shipping!)pulled out their checkbook and ordered the rehabilitation of Danica Joy (and to Danica Joy-2 also later). Danica Joy hid for a length of time in Varadero de Recodo and when she reappeared she was a spunky and reliable ship once more. And this is not what is not understood by those who do not know shipping. That when money is poured into a veteran ship, the ship becomes good and reliable once more like her former self.

The next established route of Danica Joy after her re-emergence was the blossoming Dapitan-Dumaguete route to pair with pioneering ship of Aleson Shipping there, the Ciara Joie. As a true overnight ferry, her bunks were appreciated in that route because many of the passengers there already came from distant places like Zamboanga City and having absorbed already the bumps and lack of sleep in the 11-hour ride from that distant city and you still have 8 more hours to go in the Dumaguete-Bacolod sector. One would definitely want to stretch in a bunk rather than take the seats of a basic, short-distance ferry-RORO.

The move of Aleson Shipping to field Danica Joy in that route proved to be good and she was successful there. Nearly a decade after she was refurbished, Danica Joy is still a reliable ship until now. From the time she was fielded the Danica Joy was the biggest ship in the route although the Super Shuttle Ferry 12 of Asian Marine Transport Corporation is almost as big as her. That was true until recently whenthe FastCat of Archipelago Philippine Ferries arrived. But then still her competitors in the route has no bunks to offer the passengers (basically, it is only Aleson Shipping that offers bunks in that route with their other overnight ferry-ROROs that sometimes spell the Danica Joy in the route).

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Danica Joy in Pulauan Port of Dapitan

It seems that the Dapitan-Dumaguete route is a perfect fit for Danica Joy. The 44 nautical miles of the route does not seem to stress the engines of Danica Joy which the last time I saw her was still practically smokeless. Her size is also a perfect match especially in the peak season when added capacity is needed. Her cargo deck which can take in 12 long trucks (more if there are smaller vehicles) can carry the many distributor trucks and fish carriers that teem in the route.

In my eye, the Danica Joy is still fit to sail for many more years and I expect to see her in the route for a considerable more time. I just hope the campaigners against old ferries who have their own vested interests won’t have their way because if they triumph that would mean the end of the 45-year old Danica Joy and that is a shame because she is still a good and reliable ship.

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