A Perfect Overnight Ferry?

22810263169_0021b345a6_z

The ferry Filipinas Cebu of Cokaliong Shipping Lines Incorporated (CSLI) has always impressed me. Beautiful ship. Beautiful lines. Looks sleek. Looks modern, too. Her designers should be commended for designing a ship that does not look stodgy.

The ship is 81.5 meters by 14.0m by 4.9 meters with a Gross Tonnage (GT) of 2,726 which is higher than her Japan GT of 2,323. Maybe because of the additional scantling added in the bridge or navigation deck. With those dimensions, she has a maximum passenger capacity of 642 which is median nowadays for the bigger overnight ships. Some 1,689 net tons is available for revenue from passengers and cargo. The ratio of the net tons to the gross tons is high suggesting efficient utilization of space which means good design.

What impresses me most about this ship is her small engines but which is enough for an overnight ferry here that are no longer in races (well, anyway it was only the Cebu-Cagayan route which was known for great races before). She has only 3,600 horsepower on tap from two Niigata main engines which is really on the low sides of engines with her length and capacity. Well, many of the overnight ferries of the recent years of her size even has double her horsepower. And a “modern” one, the new Starlite Ferries has only a design speed of 14.5 knots from 3,650 horsepower and those are only 67 meters in length! If they simply borrowed the design of Filipinas Cebu they might have had a winner.

30641569645_232d8ae7a4_z

The low horsepower suggests she is on the stingy side on fuel consumption. But she is not a slowpoke as her design speed or the speed when new is 16 knots which is better than that of the new Starlite Ferries. At her age of 23 years and with not much metal added, I reckon she is still easily capable of 14 knots which is median too now for the overnight ferries that are in the longer routes like Cebu to northern Mindanao. Well, I know the Cebu to Leyte ferries are slower because at an average distance of 60 nautical miles even if the sail only at 10 knots they will still reach their destination at dawn.

The almost-permanent route of Filipinas Cebu is actually the Cebu-Iloilo route, the longest direct overnight route from Cebu as of today at 180 nautical miles (through the northern route) which usually takes 14 hours to cover with the ferries doing that route. The Filipinas Cebu is actually the most beautiful ship to hold this route in the recent years, the most modern and also the youngest.

The Filipinas Cebu came to Cokaliong Shipping Lines in 2007 from Ise Bay Ferry or Isewan (Ise-wan) Ferry where she was known as the Mikawa Maru. She was built in 1993 by Naikai Zosen in Setoda, Japan. That means she was only 14 years old when she came here and few were the ships that were that young that came here in the recent years. She might have cost Cokaliong Shipping Lines more money to acquire but I think the company was lucky to have her as the reliable service that can be expected from her is long and besides her lines would still not yet look old or obsolete for many years to come. Well, in lines alone I would take her anytime compared to the new ferries of Starlite Shipping which look ugly (by modern standards) to me.

22249789198_a5187797b7_z

This ship has two-and-a-half decks of passenger accommodations with the highest at the navigation deck. She has a poop deck with chairs and tables which is the usual Cokaliong Shipping Lines design. This part of the ship can be used for eating dinner, for lounging, for sundowners or just for meeting new friends. Of course it is always clean and well-scrubbed which is the Cokaliong Shipping Lines trademark. All parts of their ships are always clean especially the passenger accommodations.

The ferry’s accommodation is divided into 5 classes: Suite, Cabin, Tourist, Lounge and the usual Economy. The Lounge is more or less the equivalent of the Jetseater Class but better as the settee is better and it has more space. I noticed that for its distance the Cebu-Iloilo fares are cheaper per nautical mile compared to the Cebu to northern Mindanao and Cebu to Leyte routes. Maybe the Filipinas Cebu was assigned the long Iloilo route because she is not thirsty on fuel and so the fares are low.

With 14 meters in breadth, the Filipinas Cebu has three lanes for vehicles in her car/cargo deck plus loose cargo in the the nooks and crannies. However, what she usually loads are basically loose and palletized cargo which are handled by forklifts in the traditional Cebu style which means one forklift inside the car/cargo deck and one forklift outside passing to each other the goods.

I do not know if the Filipinas-Cebu is considered the flagship in Cokaliong Shipping Lines but maybe she is. In this company there is no default way of gauging this as they don’t sail the premier Cebu-Mindanao route which is the Cebu-Cagayan route. I can only guess with her name and the route she is holding that she might be the highest in the totem pole of Cokaliong Shipping Lines. Well, for size she is one of the biggest of the shipping company and at relative par with the other big ones like the Filipinas Nasipit, Filipinas Iligan and Filipinas Butuan. The Filipinas Iloilo and Filipinas Maasin are as big but they are already old, slow ships that are already past their prime.

5897650378_6f7f231c7c_z

Photo by Cokaliong Shipping Lines Inc.

This ship like others in the Cokaliong fleet does a back-and-forth short route in her off-days which is her 7th day of the week. Though utilized all days of the week this ship has been very reliable with no reports of mechanical breakdowns.

With her size, speed and relatively small engine plus her looks might be the best overnight ferry around in Cebu. Even after nearly ten years of service here, she seems not diminished.

I guess she will still sail satisfactorily for many more years to come and along the way earn many more fans.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s