The Trucks and The Completion of the South Road Sank the Passenger-Cargo Ships to Bicol

1938-dec-10-schedule

Shipping Guide of Philippine Herald of Dec. 10, 1938 from Gorio Belen

In the past there were passenger-cargo ships from Manila whose route were ports in the Bicol peninsula. It was numerous before the war because in that period the Bicol Line of the railways was not yet connected to the South Line (it was only connected in 1938 and was dynamited at the start of the Pacific War).

After the war there were again passenger-cargo ships sailing to Bicol mainland ports but not as numerous before the war (because the Bicol Line of the railways was again connected to the South Line and there were plenty of rolling stock left by the US Army). These ship usually called on many Bicol ports on its voyage with Larap port in Camarines Norte the farthest port (which means the ship rounds almost the entire Bicol peninsula). Madrigal Shipping, however, had a route to Bicol that go round northern Luzon(what a long route!).

8043608766_f92d3ee33e_z

From the research of Gorio Belen in the National Library

Among the other Bicol ports where ships from Manila called were J. Panganiban and Mercedes (in Camarines Norte), Tandoc (in Camarines Sur), Virac (in Catanduanes), Tabaco and Legazpi (both in Albay)and Bulan, Casiguran and Sorsogon (all in Sorsogon). Also among the Bicol ports where postwar Bicol ships called was Masbate. Before the war there were other Bicol ports served by passenger-cargo ships from Manila like Rio de Guinobatan, Aroroy, Pilar, Donsol, Gubat, Nato, Lagonoy, Paracale, etc.

Some of these passenger-cargo ships also called in northern Samar ports before pivoting and going to eastern Bicol ports. These ships were not big as many were just former “FS” and former “Y” ships. The others that were not were just of the same size. At the postwar peak of these Bicol routes the backbone of the local passenger inter-island fleet were just ex-”FS” ships anyway. Besides the cargo was not really that big because the ships were in competition with the railways which was faster than them.

6871452302_7f3e044c6d_z

A former “FS” ship that once had a route to Bicol (from the research of Gorio Belen)

Among the shipping companies that served Bicol, initially the most prominent was Madrigal Shipping which were mainly using former “Y” ships. Philippine President Lines served Bicol when they started in 1960 but it did not last long. Among the minor shipping companies that had routes to Bicol were North Camarines Norte Lumber which later became NORCAMCO and NCL. Others that served Bicol were N&S Lines, Rodrigueza Shipping, South Sea Shipping, Mabuhay Shipping and Eastern Shipping Company (though not all at the same time).

1967-6-7-sweetwilliam-escanorodrigueza-2

From Manila Times, 6/7/67; Gorio Belen research in the National Library

How come then that these Bicol ships survived against the faster trains which had four freight trains to Bicol daily at its peak? The reason is the train only goes up to Legazpi. All the ports in Bicol served by the passenger-cargo ships to Bicol except for Legazpi were not served by the trains. As for transfers, trucks were very few in that era. And pilferage and robbery were very rampant in the trains and in its stations.

1972-nov-28-norcamco

From the research of Gorio Belen in the National Library

Trucks, in the first 30 years after the war were not a viable way to ship to Bicol. The South Road (the original name of the road going to Bicol) was not only bad. It was atrocious. Practically, only ALATCO then can complete that route then as they had many stations along the way where checks can be made and repairs performed as they have mechanics and parts in those stations. They also had tow trucks and their vehicles had regular runs and so breakdowns can be reported (most towns then do not have telephones yet; what they had were telegraphs).

Things however changed sometime in 1975 when the South Road was already nearly complete. Trucks (and buses) began to roll. And the new cemented highway extended up to Bulan. Suddenly, the speeds was faster and breakdowns became few. Where before ALATCO took two days for the Manila-Larap-Tabaco run, now the Manila-Bulan run took only a night of travel even though it passes via Camarines Norte.

These trucks can make direct deliveries to Camarines Norte, the Partido area of Camarines Sur, Tabaco and Tiwi (site of the geothermal plant) and Sorsogon, which formerly were not served by the railways. Moreover, because of the Mayon Volcano eruption of 1968 the railway service to Legazpi was also cut (the new train terminus was just Camalig).

avatar_6256

From go.bicol.com

In the late 1970’s the shipping lines to Bicol were already under very great pressure by the trucks (and also by the buses which also carry some cargo). I think what broke the camel’s back was the emergence of the express trucks in Bicol sometime in 1976. These trucks really run very fast because they carry the newspapers to Bicol. From the first editions of the newspapers that rolled out of the presses at 10pm the previous night, they were expected to be in Naga by daybreak (after offloading papers and cargo for Daet) and continue to Legazpi and arrive there before the start of office hours while making deliveries in the towns along the way. These trucks will barrel their way again to Manila the next night irregardless of the volume of cargo. Before the end of the decade, these express trucks were already ubiquitous in Bicol.

In 1979, Luzon and Visayas were finally connected intermodally between Matnog and Allen by Cardinal Shipping. Trucks and buses began to roll to Eastern Visayas and they can do the trip in no more than a day and they ran daily. The liner companies from Manila which had combined routes to Samar and Bicol suddenly saw the bottoms fell out of them because the trucks and buses were beating them badly in both areas. By 1980, the shipping lines serving Bicol were already on its death throes.

16070468655_ab05db2abe_z

From the research of Gorio Belen in the National Library

That was how the Bicol shipping lines lost to the trucks and buses. The completed of highway was now called as the Maharlika Highway. Incidentally, in the same period the railways also began to sink too due to the relentless onslaught of the buses and the trucks.

Yes, things always change. Some rise, some lose.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s