The Southern Lines Inc.

Southern Lines Incorporated is one is the earliest shipping companies that was able to sail right after World War II. It was not a pre-war shipping company so it was not a recipient of replacement ships from the US. But as a Lopez-dominated company it was loaded in money, political connections and gravitas just like the other prominent Ilonggo shipping company, the De la Rama Steamship Company. Southern Lines Inc. was established in 1946, the first to be established in Iloilo City after the war. The founders of Southern Lines Inc. were not only prominent people in business and agriculture in Iloilo and Negros Oriental provinces but many were also founders of the pre-war Negros Navigation Company.

Southern Lines Inc. started with six ex-”F” ships and six ex-PT boats sourced from the US Navy. These were the vessels already here in the Philippines when the war ended and the US was simply loath to bring them back to the US as they no longer had use for them and so they just sold them cheap here. And the Lopezes simply were one the richest then in Iloilo especially their Chairman of the Board, Vicente Lopez Sr.

In 1947, Southern Lines Inc. was able to acquire two ex-”FS” from the Philippine Shipping Administration which was then in charge of selling the former US Navy ships that were passed to the Philippine government as aid and which were meant to augment our shipping fleet. These became the ferries Governor Wright and the Governor Smith. The first was assigned to the Manila-Butuan route and the latter was assigned to the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan route.

The ex-”F” ships was then assigned to the Visayas-Mindanao routes of the company. The company then had routes to Cebu, Zamboanga and Cotabato from Iloilo. They also had a Cebu-Zamboanga route and a Zamboanga-Cotabato route. The ex-”F” ships which were smaller than the ex-”FS” ships at 30.2 meters by 6.4 meters were actually better suited to regional routes.

In 1947, Southern Lines Inc. sold the Governor Wright to the French Government in Vietnam and bought another ex-”FS” ship which became the Governor Gilbert. This was no longer assigned to the Butuan route and instead she was assigned to the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan route. From hereon, aside from the regional routes, Southern Lines just concentrated on the Manila-Iloilo-Pulupandan (or Bacolod) route.

In 1948, Southern Lines Inc. acquired another ex-”FS” ship which became the second Governor Wright. However, this was sold to Philippine Steamship and Navigation Company (PSNC) in 1952 and in its place Southern Lines Inc. bought the Kilkenzie which was a former frigate of the Royal Navy that was converted into a cargo ship after the war. She was then converted in a passenger-cargo ship and she became the third Governor Wright of the company. This ship was actually built in the US and became part of the Lend-Lease program to the United Kingdom. In size this ship was almost the same in size as the ex-”FS” ships but she was a lot faster at 16 knots compared to the 12 knots maximum of the ex-”FS” ships.

The aforementioned ships became the fleet of Southern Lines Inc. The only further ship she acquired was the Don Julio which came from Ledesma Shipping Lines. The Don Julio was another ex-”FS” ship but re-engined. In liner routes, Southern Lines was heavily dependent on the former “FS” ships.

Southern Lines just had one purpose-built luxury liner, the Governor B. Lopez, a brand-new ship built by National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), a government-owned shipyard in Mariveles, Bataan. The ship was commissioned in 1961 and she was also the biggest ship ever of the company. The order of this ship was financed by a loan from the government-owned Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP).

To round out the fleet. Among the ex-”F” ships of the company were the Governor Forbes, Governor Wood, Governor Roosevelt, Governor Stimson and Governor Murphy. Some of their other ships were Governor Hayden and Governor Taft. This is not a complete list, however. They styled their ships as M/S, the abbreviation for Motor Ship. They did not use M/V or Motor Vessel.

Until their end in the mid-1960’s, Southern Lines Inc. basically sailed only to the Iloilo and Bacolod/Pulupandan. At times they made an Estancia call, too. They did not really branch out anywhere else except they had Visayas-Mindanao regional routes.

Southern Lines Inc. and De la Rama Steamship were the first shipping companies that held on routes to the premier cities of Western Visayas. They were followed by Ledesma Shipping Lines but this was a smaller company. When De la Rama Steamship later concentrated on foreign routes Southern Lines Inc. became the biggest liner company based in Western Visayas. There was no Negros Navigation Company liner routes yet and they were only doing Iloilo-Negros routes. Negros Navigation Company became a liner company when Ledesma Shipping Lines merged with them.

Maybe Southern Lines Inc. stymied the growth of Negros Navigation Company/Ledesma Shipping Lines or they had an agreement not to compete. It seems the latter only grew as a liner company when Southern Lines decided to quit shipping in the mid-1960’s. They forthwith then sold their ships to different shipping companies.

The Governor B. Lopez went to Carlos A. Go Thong & Co. in 1966 where she became the first Dona Ana. The Don Julio was sold to Philippine Pioneer Lines in 1966 too where she became the Pioneer Leyte. The third Governor Wright went to Sweet Lines Inc. in 1967 where she became the Sweet Sail. Meanwhile, Governor Taft and the Governor Murphy were transferred to Visayan Transportation Company. This might have been the successor to their regional operations.

That was the rather short career of Southern Lines Inc. which lasted only two decades. After her demise, Negros Navigation started growing fast. Like Southern Lines Inc., Negros Navigation Company only sailed the Iloilo and Bacolod routes for a long time.

Like in a relay race, it is as if the baton was passed.

[Photo Credit and Research Support: Gorio Belen]

[Database Support: Jun Marquez/Mike Baylon/PSSS]

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